April 28th, 2010
06:34 PM ET

Senate agrees to begin debate on Wall Street reform

[Updated at 6:33 p.m.] Republicans ended their filibuster of Wall Street reforms Wednesday when the Senate agreed without a vote to begin debate on a financial regulations bill.

The Senate agreed by unanimous consent to launch debate on the bill after a similar motion failed three times in the previous 48 hours to win the necessary 60 votes for approval.

[Posted at 5:22 p.m.] Top Senate Republicans signaled Wednesday that a GOP filibuster of Wall Street reform legislation will end.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Kentucky, released a statement saying closed-door negotiations with Democrats on the financial regulations reform bill had ended with agreement on some issues but others left unresolved.

"Now that those bipartisan negotiations have ended, it is my hope that the majority's avowed interest in improving this legislation on the Senate floor is genuine and the partisan gamesmanship is over," McConnell's statement said.

Unanimous opposition by Senate Republicans this week has prevented approval of three successive motions to begin debate on the bill.

Top Senate Republicans signaled Wednesday that a GOP filibuster of Wall Street reform legislation will end.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Kentucky, released a statement saying closed-door negotiations with Democrats on the financial regulations reform bill had ended with agreement on some issues but others left unresolved.

"Now that those bipartisan negotiations have ended, it is my hope that the majority's avowed interest in improving this legislation on the Senate floor is genuine and the partisan gamesmanship is over," McConnell's statement said.

Unanimous opposition by Senate Republicans this week has prevented approval of three successive motions to begin debate on the bill.

Read the full CNN.com story

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Filed under: Economy • Politics
soundoff (8 Responses)
  1. Thad

    "Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Kentucky, released a statement saying closed-door negotiations with Democrats on the financial regulations reform bill had ended with agreement on some issues but others left unresolved."

    Huh. I thought Republicans HATED closed-door negotiations and wanted everything to be broadcast on C-SPAN.

    Or was that last month?

    April 28, 2010 at 7:33 pm | Report abuse |
  2. Pam

    wow, do they think we're idiots???? way to take the focus off the issues that are polarizing the country and focus on something you think every voter will be behind.....another pre-election stunt....sick of it!!!!

    April 28, 2010 at 8:03 pm | Report abuse |
  3. Mateo

    So you would rather have them do nothing and have another recession in 20 years?

    April 28, 2010 at 9:19 pm | Report abuse |
  4. John Hudak

    Let us give the Democrats a super majority in this next election. let us see if they can do what they say that they can do. If not, then they will have had their chance. I do not believe they can foul things any worse than 8 years of Bush and Cheney. Let us examine where we where before Bush. We were worried about a horny President. We did have a surplus in our budget the dollar was the strongest it had been in decades. We had a near full employment. People could save money and get a decent return that was safe. Crime and welfare were on a downward slope. Now WHY should we trust the Republicans to do better with a second chance? Let us see 2 wars, deficit spending, fat cats wallowing in greed and glut and hard workers losing their hard earned pensions, homes and 401k.

    April 28, 2010 at 10:51 pm | Report abuse |
  5. gb

    Thad, the quote doesn't really specify who wanted "closed-door negotiations." Maybe it was a Democratic prerequisite to negotiation.

    April 28, 2010 at 11:36 pm | Report abuse |
  6. xinlaw

    More proof that the Republican Party will be damned before they allow the Obama (a democrat who is also black) and his administration to fix the f'ups their party created during their 8 years of ravaging our country.

    April 29, 2010 at 6:22 am | Report abuse |
  7. berndtc

    I'm glad the Repub's decided to end their polical gamesmanship, at least on this issue. We can't really expect them to do what's good for the nation and stop going after political points entirely. That would be bipartisan, and they aren't going there.

    April 29, 2010 at 10:11 am | Report abuse |
  8. Thea2b

    Hah!!! They decide to move forward when faced with actually having to filibuster in an all night session. What a joke the republican party has become. I am so glad I left them during Iran Contra!

    April 29, 2010 at 10:55 am | Report abuse |