May 3rd, 2010
10:10 PM ET

Latest Updates: Flooding and storms in the Southeast

Heavy rains and floods killed 15 people in Tennessee. Now the storm is drenching Atlanta, Georgia.

[Updated at 10:08 p.m.] The severe weather was blamed for at least 27 deaths - 18 in Tennessee - across the Southeast between Saturday and Monday, emergency officials said. Ten of those deaths occurred in Davidson County including Nashville, the Nashville mayor's office said.

Nashville residents said that despite forecasts of rain going into the weekend, they had little time to prepare for the floodwaters that crept into homes, washed away roads, prompted evacuations of hotels and displaced thousands of people.

"We all knew that there was going to be heavy rains this weekend, but Nashville normally gets about 5 inches of rain in the month of May and nobody could have predicted 15-16 inches of rain in 48 hours," resident John Rives said.

Read the full CNN.com story

iReport: Are you there? Send photos, videos | FAA.com: Check airport delays

[Updated at 7:05 p.m.] A collection of iReport accounts from affected areas in the Southeast.

[Updated at 10:54 a.m.] We're receiving tons of photos and videos from our iReporters capturing the rapidly moving flooding in Tennessee including this one from Tom Frundle in Smyrna, Tennessee - 14 miles south of Nashville – which shows roads completely overtaken by flood waters.

"I've lived in different parts of the country and I've never seen anything like this," Frundle told CNN.

[Updated at 10:26 a.m] Parts of downtown Nashville are beginning to flood as the Cumberland River continues to rise, which has overwhelmed the sewer systems, CNN affiliate WKRN reported.

The Cumberland River has reached 50-feet above flood stage and water is beginning to flood from the sewer system onto First Avenue, WKRN reported, noting the sewer overflow is threatening downtown businesses, closest to Broadway Avenue.

"Right now we're watching the river real closely," Metro Police Chief Ronal Serpas told News 2. "We're going to continue to keep our fingers crossed that this is going to be as bad as it's going to get, but it's too early to tell. We've got all the right people paying attention and watching.

About 1,500 guests of the Opryland Hotel had to spend Sunday night in a high school to escape the flooding Cumberland River, CNN affiliate WSMV reported.

[Updated at 10:14 a.m.] A rain gauge at a CNN employee's home in Atlanta registered 4.5 inches of rain between 6 p.m. Sunday and 8 a.m. Monday.

In Tennessee, rain and flooding left at least 11 dead. The storm closed interstate highways, displaced thousands from their homes, prompted evacuations of hotels and nursing homes and turned city streets and parking lots into raging rivers.

Parts of the state have been drenched with up to 20 inches of rain and more was expected. The storm also killed four people in Mississippi, three in tornadoes and one in a rain-related traffic accident.

[Updated  at 9:21 a.m.] Thunderstorms and heavy rain were forecast to continue in north Georgia through the morning, with rainfall of up to one inch an hour possible, the National Weather Service said.

[Posted at 7:34 a.m.] A storm that has killed at least 15 people in Tennessee and Mississippi rolled into Georgia early Monday, flooding Atlanta streets and delaying flights into Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport.

Heavy rainfall was expected to dump 2 to 3 inches of rain in north Georgia by 8 a.m. ET and the National Weather Service issued a flash flood warning for three counties in metro Atlanta.

The storm snarled the morning commute in what is already one of the most congested traffic areas in the nation. No deaths or injuries were immediately reported.

In Tennessee, rain and flooding left at least 11 dead. The storm closed interstate highways, displaced thousands from their homes, prompted evacuations of hotels and nursing homes and turned city streets and parking lots into raging rivers.

Parts of the state have been drenched with up to 20 inches of rain and more was expected.

The storm also killed four people in Mississippi.

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soundoff (25 Responses)
  1. Dominic Bradish

    I haven't been able to reach my friends in the area. I'm worried.

    May 4, 2010 at 3:07 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  2. Missy Carlson

    I'm posting pictures of the Nashville flooding on clixtr. feel free to look at mine and add your own. Consider donating to the Red Cross http://clixtr.com/6mv6

    May 4, 2010 at 7:44 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  3. Jeffrey Davis

    more white trash dead!? this day gets better and better!

    May 5, 2010 at 12:57 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  4. Jeffrey Davis

    more white trash dead!? how could this day get any better?

    May 5, 2010 at 12:58 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  5. LB

    White trash? Excuse me, but I am from Memphis, Tennessee and I have a doctorate degree as well as 2 other degrees. My family lives in Germantown and are lucky to have avoided the flood but many others have severe damage. Before you say cruel things about people, please consider what you are saying. There is white trash everywhere and the last time I checked, it took white trash to know white trash.

    May 5, 2010 at 5:23 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  6. gypsysoul

    @ Jeffrey Davis (real creative name there). Ok, here I go in my most charming southern bell accent: Sweetie, We live in one of the most expensive area codes in the COUNTRY. Where the average median income per family is $194,016 to be exact. We are not what the average person considers white trash, however..I can perceive how you could enter this zip code and stick out like a sore thumb. In other words, just by your ignorant remark..you sir, are the white trash!

    WE ARE NASHVILLE!! Where neighbors are helping neighbors!

    May 6, 2010 at 2:18 am | Report abuse | Reply
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