May 3rd, 2010
10:04 PM ET

Latest Updates: Reports and perspectives on Gulf oil spill

Workers in Louisiana place an oil boom into the water to try and protect the coast line from the massive oil spill.

[Updated at 10:01 p.m.]  BP chief executive Tony Hayward vowed that the oil giant would "absolutely be paying for the cleanup operation" of the oil leak in the Gulf of Mexico. 

"Where legitimate claims are made, we will be good for them," he told NPR's "Morning Edition." 

The U.S. government was leaving little to chance. Attorney General Eric Holder said Monday that Justice Department employees were in the Gulf region "to ensure that BP is held liable." 

Allen said BP "is the responsible party" and "will bear all the costs" of the cleanup. 

Still, the promises failed to quell the fears. "I hope we can weather the storm," said Keith Delcambre, owner of seafood market Bozo's in Pascagoula, Mississippi 

See a timeline of the oil spill in the Gulf

[Updated at 9:56 p.m.] BP this week is going to attempt an unprecedented engineering feat to try and stop the oil spill, reports CNN's Brian Todd. It involves lowering a four-story metal container onto the leaking pipe to try to suck in the flowing oil. 

[Updated at 9:31 p.m.] CNN.com's Steve Almasy reports that environmental scientists say the effects of the spill in the Gulf of Mexico could have ecological and biological consequences for years, if not decades. 

[Updated at 1:56 p.m.] The Half Shell Oyster House in Gulfport, Mississippi is making plans to get their oysters, shrimp and fish from elsewhere in the Gulf of Mexico. Staffers tell CNN their local supplier has a plan to fish in areas closer to Texas, but they  still expect seafood prices to go up. However, the staffers say they don't expect much of a tourism decline unless the oil slick actually hits the local beaches. For now, the oil slick has remained offshore. 

A portion of the northern Gulf of Mexico was closed to fishing on Sunday, curtailing the billion-dollar business. 

[Updated at 1:47 p.m.] Florida Governor Charlie Crist told reporters in Tallahassee that he may extend the declaration on Tuesday to Collier and Monroe counties. 

"In the event that the oil does come to our shores, I want us to be ahead of it as much as humanly possible," he said about the spill, which the oil giant BP is responsible for cleaning up. 

Preparations are under way on strategies to stop the leak, though each has drawbacks. 

The initial plan is to lower a dome over the wellhead next week to capture the spewing oil, said state Secretary of Environmental Protection Michael Sole. 

"That would stop the flow, if successful," he said. "Unfortunately, it's never been tried at 5,000 feet below the surface of the water." 

[Updated at 1:06 p.m.] Interior Secretary Ken Salazar, Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano and other Obama White House officials are scheduled to meet with Hayward and BP America President Lamar McKay Monday afternoon to "discuss ongoing, coordinated response efforts and receive an update on BP's mitigation plans for potentially impacted Gulf Coast states," according to an administration official.  

[Updated at 12:37 a.m.] Florida Governor Charlie Crist extended Monday a state of emergency to the coastal counties of Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson, Taylor, Dixie, Levy, Citrus, Hernando, Pasco, Pinellas, Hillsborough, Manatee and Sarasota due to the offshore oil leak. 

[Updated at 11:19 a.m.] The Justice Department, however, has sent a team to the Gulf Coast to meet with federal prosecutors and response teams, the department has said. 

Attorney General Eric Holder said Monday that Justice employees are in the Gulf region "to ensure that BP is held liable." 

[Update 10:32 a.m.] The oil disaster in the Gulf of Mexico comes a month after President Obama announced plans to expand offshore drilling. CNN's Kristi Keck takes a look at how the oil spill could sap appetite for Obama's offshore drilling plans. [Update: 9:19 a.m. ET] BP will "absolutely be paying for the cleanup operation" of the huge oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, chief executive Tony Hayward said Monday. 

"There's no doubt about that." 

"It is indeed BP's responsibility to deal with this and we're dealing with it," Hayward told NPR's "Morning Edition." 

And, he added, "where legitimate claims (of damages) are made, we will be good for them," according to NPR's website. 

[Posted at 7:56 a.m ET] The battle against a huge oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico is being waged on three fronts, United States Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said Monday. 

"One is to cap the well" that is leaking the oil, she said. "Efforts to do that have not succeeded to date." 

Authorities are also trying to keep the slick from reaching land, and preparing to clean it up immediately if it does make landfall, she said on CNN's "American Morning." 

Previous roundups:
– SUNDAY: An eerie stillness along Mississippi coast
SATURDAY: 'This will be catastrophic to the mom and pop businesses' and more stories
FRIDAY: 'People want to get ready for this, but they don't know what to do' and more stories

Read Sunday's roundup of oil spill coverage

soundoff (158 Responses)
  1. worker

    I have talked to several people the last few days, several wondered what they could do to help, or wondered if there were any jobs available.

    May 3, 2010 at 7:14 pm | Report abuse |
  2. Jean Vreeland

    Subject: Gulf Coast Oil Spill
    This disaster is unprecedented; the damage to the ocean, wildlife and local industries may be irreparable. This oil spill may take months to stop and years to clean up. The damage to this already fragile region is beyond comprehension and is yet to be fully realized.

    We can and must do something
    We must cut down on driving: use mass transit, bike ride, walk, work from home and do all we can to cut down on oil consumption every day.

    We must show the oil industry we can live without them quite well. Participate in the first Annual National No Drive Day!!!

    National No Drive Day
    June 1, 2010
    • Work at home
    • Take a bus
    • Ride a bike
    • Walk

    We must make a statement to the oil companies and offer our condolences and support to the gulf coast region.

    When we make substantial cuts in oil consumption, offshore drilling will cease. We already have alternative modes of transportation, we need to use them before we completely destroy the environment.

    Please publicize this and pass it on, email to everyone you know. We must do something and we can. Consumers have power, we must stop consuming and make a statement.

    May 3, 2010 at 7:15 pm | Report abuse |
  3. Aaron

    Obama's legacy – Spill baby spill!

    May 3, 2010 at 7:18 pm | Report abuse |
  4. Monkey Doo

    Let's set up a mechanism to guide the oil slick to the United Kingdom and let them deal with it.

    May 3, 2010 at 7:22 pm | Report abuse |
  5. Sheldon I. Katchatag

    IMPEACH INTERIOR SECRETARY – DERELICTION OF DUTY!:

    FEDERAL INDIAN law REQUIRES the Sec. Interior to ADVOCATE & LITIGATE to PRPTECT &PRESERVE Indigenous PEOPLES' 'CUSTOMARY & TRADITIONAL' annuall-RENEWED Natural RESOURCES that ARE the BACKBONE & FABRIC of Our 'STATE=OF-THE-ART' Renewable RESOURCE Cultures CONTINUOUSLY-Practiced SINCE the Western Society'S 'STONE AGE'.
    RESCIND ALL Arctic OCEAN Drilling PERMINTS – INCOMPLETE, INSUFFICIENT Environmental Review RECORDS:

    National ENVIRONMENTAL Protection Act REQUIRES COMPREHENSIVE Environmental Impact Assessment – WORST Case SCENARIO:
    AFTER an Oil Spill UNDER the ARCTIC Ice Floes is TOO LATE:
    CURRENTLY the Arctic Ocean ALGAL Blooms ARE BEGINNING at the VERY Location that simple LAWS of Physics says that the Spilled Oil WILL MIGRATE to – the JUNCTION between the Ice BOTTOM and the TOP of the Water COLUMN.
    This WILL KILL the Algae – AND the ENTIRE Food Chain PARTICIPANTS – BOTTOM to TOP, smallest to LARGEST – that CANNOT MIGRATE BACK to ABUNDANT Food – WILL not ONLY NOT REPRODUCE – those SPECIES will DIE EN MASSE.
    The SOCIO-ECONOMIC IMPACT on the Customary & Traditional RENEWABLE Resource CULTURE Associated with the LOST Renewable Resources of the Arctic Ocean on the INDIGENOUS INUPAAT will be DEVASTATION.
    Sheldon I. Katchatag – Inupaaq

    May 3, 2010 at 7:34 pm | Report abuse |
  6. William A. Ashe

    I am the founder of Lifewater international. We deal with Wells all over the world.

    A simple way to seal this broken pipe is with a steel conical sitting. Calculate the size, shape and weight necessary to make the epoxy sealed the pipe.

    Fill the point and of the conical fitting with a catalyst that is petroleum sensitive to start a heartening

    Lower the cone upside down onto the broken pipe guided by GPS and video cameras.

    Once in place and the epoxy sets up the league will stop.

    Sincerely

    William A. Ashe

    May 3, 2010 at 7:42 pm | Report abuse |
  7. Jim

    Where is Red Adair, If he is alive get him NOW! If he is dead dig him up, but get him here!! he would have a solution by tomorrow.

    May 3, 2010 at 7:43 pm | Report abuse |
  8. Mike G

    I just read a story about a company in the Northeast that makes a product to absorb oil in water. Why isn't BP and the Feds using better technology? http://www.mopenvironmental.com/ It looks like a possible solution.

    May 3, 2010 at 7:43 pm | Report abuse |
  9. BoB

    "Cap the Well"" Use a precast concrete or steel funnel of adaquate size and weight
    to lower upside down over the well head. the weight of the funnel must be higher that the
    pressure exiting the well (tons) as the oil is captured it will rise up the narrowing walls of the
    funnel into an attached hose leading up to a tanker.It would be temparary until a better
    solution can be found.

    May 3, 2010 at 8:05 pm | Report abuse |
  10. Patricia C

    BP can never pay enough to cover what has been lost in terms of wildlife, and a way of living for so many. What has been lost is priceless. When will they ever learn?

    May 3, 2010 at 8:08 pm | Report abuse |
  11. Karen Peckham

    Is it possible that there were radical Muslims working
    onboard the rig and blew themselves up in the early
    morning hours so as to inflict major damage to the
    Gulf Coast and its fishing grounds?

    B.P. should not only be held civilly responsible for this
    mess, but criminally charged with gross negligence
    for fouling up the environment and, quite frankly (because
    this is affecting everybody on the Gult Coast) they should be
    subjected to the death penalty for causing Earth's worst
    environmental catastrophe EVER!!!

    May 3, 2010 at 8:59 pm | Report abuse |
  12. JOHN

    WAG THE DOG. THE BRITISH GOVERMENT AND BP ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR THE TIMESQUARE FAKE BOMBING TO TAKE THE NEWS MEDIA AWAY FROM THE SPILL

    May 3, 2010 at 9:01 pm | Report abuse |
  13. Bill Edwards

    President Obama, it is time to bring the military into this crisis. BP has no clue what they are doing. A Navy destroyer could place a large conventional explosive on the ocean floor and the resulting explosion would cause the sea floor to collapse in on the drill hole stopping the oil gusher instantly....please call in the military NOW!!

    May 3, 2010 at 9:02 pm | Report abuse |
  14. Captain Wayne Genthner

    I'm a fishing charter operator based out of Longboat Key Florida. Tomorrow our county comission has an emergency meeting to discuss just what the heck we're going to do about this river of oil headed our way. Everything depends on that oil not geting ashore and not getting into our mangrove estuary. Everyone around here is scared sick. Everyone except the BP station folks who just raised the price of gas 5 cents yesterday. Go figure!

    May 3, 2010 at 9:21 pm | Report abuse |
  15. Patrick

    FUNNY! Narry a word out of the attention seeker Sarah Palin since this happened! Hows that "drill baby drill" thing workin' out for ya NOW, Sarah?

    May 3, 2010 at 9:27 pm | Report abuse |
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