June 21st, 2010
10:36 AM ET

High Court upholds terror law after free speech challenge

A divided Supreme Court has ruled the government's power to criminalize "material support" of a terrorist organization is constitutionally permissible.

The 6-3 ruling preserves a key provision of the 2001 Patriot Act, amid claims it threatens the free-speech rights of Americans who would assist non-violent activities of certain militant and terror groups.

At issue was whether the federal law allows prosecution of those with knowledge of "any service, training, expert advice or assistance" to a foreign terrorist organization, as designated by the U.S. government.

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Filed under: Supreme Court • Terrorism
soundoff (5 Responses)
  1. Shabba Koroma

    I known America is still a powerful country in the world believe it or not. I had visited many countries in the world I known how most countries are. Please haters leave this country only. we from third world dependent on no one but America. This country have given us chances to be what ever you can. the calls is us......

    June 21, 2010 at 11:22 am | Report abuse | Reply
  2. Akiko Harada

    Can the government use the same law aganst domestic terrorist that spread drsntion, hate, and open defiance of the law as well?

    June 21, 2010 at 11:49 am | Report abuse | Reply
  3. Juan zamora

    And so is born the thought crime.....

    June 21, 2010 at 4:47 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  4. MassiveMarbles

    If someone has precognitive knowledge of a terroristic act and does not notify the authorities then they are accomplices to the crime.

    June 21, 2010 at 7:33 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  5. Joni

    I\'m so glad that the internet alolws free info like this!

    September 7, 2011 at 1:22 pm | Report abuse | Reply

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