July 12th, 2010
10:20 PM ET

Barefoot Bandit: Folk hero or crook?

The Barefoot Bandit has more than 80,000 Facebook fans who see him as a folk hero, a modern-day Jesse James. But police say Colton Harris-Moore is a brazen 19-year-old criminal, pure and simple.

The beginning and end of Harris-Moore's two-year run as a wanted fugitive is the stuff of Hollywood. Indeed, one studio has optioned his story. But police and some of his victims don't think he should be glamorized as he makes his first court appearance Tuesday.

"They can never imprison a mind like yours Colton," wrote one admirer on Harris-Moore's Facebook fan page Monday, a day after he was captured during a high-speed boat chase in the Bahamas.

FULL POST

July 12th, 2010
04:02 PM ET

U.S. suspends deepwater drilling again

The Interior Department says the moratorium is a chance to learn from the BP spill.

The federal government announced Monday it is issuing a new moratorium on deepwater drilling in the Gulf of Mexico effective until as late as November 30.

A previous six-month ban issued in the wake of the Gulf oil disaster was thrown out by a federal judge. Last week, a federal appeals panel rejected the government's request to overturn the lower court judge's decision. Obama administration officials have repeatedly indicated their intention to reinstate the moratorium since the initial ruling.

The Department of Interior said the moratorium was backed by a record that stated allowing deepwater drilling to continue "would pose a threat of serious, irreparable, or immediate harm or damage to the marine, coastal, and human environment."

The moratorium, according to the statement, allows operators to show they can respond effectively to oil spills in the Gulf.  It will also facilitate an assessment of "strategies and methods" in the event of another deepwater rig blowout, while also allowing for additional "collection and analysis of key evidence regarding the potential causes" of the BP oil spill.

FULL STORY

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Filed under: BP • Gulf Coast Oil Spill
July 12th, 2010
03:10 PM ET

FBI to assist in Uganda bombing investigation

White House spokesman Robert Gibbs says the FBI will help probe a Uganda bombing.

The FBI will assist in the investigation of the Uganda bombings, White House press secretary Robert Gibbs said Monday.

Gibbs told a White House news conference that President Barack Obama called Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni on Monday morning to express his "sincere condolences for the loss of life." Obama also offered to provide the Uganda government with any support or assistance it needs, Gibbs said. "I'm told that the FBI will assist in the investigation of the bombings yesterday," he said.

A trio of bombings killed at least 74 people Sunday at two venues in the Ugandan capital where crowds had gathered to watch the WorldCup final, authorities said.

In the phone conversation, "the leaders reaffirmed their shared commitment to working together to combat terrorist organizations that threaten innocent civilians around the world," Gibbs said, condemning the bombings.

"I think there is no clearer signal about the hateful motives of terrorists than was sent yesterday," Gibbs said.

FULL STORY ON BOMBING

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Filed under: Security Brief
July 12th, 2010
02:57 PM ET

Police: Shooter kills self, two others in workplace attack

Police respond to a workplace shooting in Albuquerque, New Mexico, on Monday.

[Updated at 5:44 p.m., July 12] Three people - not six, as police initially said - are dead after Monday's shooting at a business in Albuquerque, according to Police Chief Ray Schultz.

The three dead include the shooter, who turned a gun on himself, according to police.

[Updated at 2:58 p.m., July 12] A former employee shot and killed five people at a business Monday in Albuquerque before turning the gun on herself, New Mexico authorities said.

Police said officers responded to a 911 call at 9:26 a.m. (11:26 a.m. ET) that multiple shots had been fired. When officers entered the building, they found a total of 10 people shot: four were dead, including a man believed to be the shooter, officials said. CNN mistakenly reported earlier that the shooter was believed to be a woman.

Are you there? Please send your pictures, videos and stories to CNN's iReport.com

Two people have died as a result of gunshot wounds, two are in stable condition, and two others are receiving emergency medical attention, police said.

"We believe this incident to be a domestic-violence workplace situation," Albuquerque Police Chief Ray Schultz said.

One of the victims, Schultz said, is believed to be the wife or girlfriend of the shooter, who was a current employee at Emcore Coporation.

According to CNN affiliate KRQE, police said the shooter had been involved in a past domestic violence incident.

FULL STORY

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Filed under: Crime
July 12th, 2010
01:45 PM ET

Israel army: Commandos on flotilla acted bravely

Israel is defending its controversial handling of an aid flotilla, saying its troops acted professionally.

Israeli navy commando soldiers boarded the Gaza-bound flotilla in May, resulting in violence between troops and activists that left nine Turks dead. Despite public outcry over the incident, Israel said its commandos "operated properly, with professionalism, bravery and resourcefulness" and "exhibited correct decision making," according to an Israeli army review of the incident released Monday.

"The use of live fire was justified and the entire operation is estimable," the statement said.

The review was conducted by a team of experts, and their conclusions were presented Monday, the Israel Defense Forces said in a statement. The flotilla incident provides an opportunity to learn for future
missions, said Lt. Gen. Gabi Ashkenazi, Israel Defense Forces' chief of the  general staff, in a second statement.

"The IDF is confident enough to critically examine itself and improve based on the conclusions," Ashkenazi said. While no failures or negligence were found, "nonetheless, an examination as thorough as this brings up mistakes which must be corrected for future incidents."

FULL STORY

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Filed under: Gaza • Israel
July 12th, 2010
01:29 PM ET

Leaking well's new cap appears to be in place

Retired Adm. Thad Allen says scientists will gauge the well's pressure after the cap is in place.

[Updated at 8:11 p.m.] BP appears to have placed a new containment cap on the leaking oil well in the Gulf of Mexico.

BP hopes the new cap will contain the gushing oil, but tests are still needed to determine its effectiveness.

[Posted at 1:29 p.m.] Crews working on the leaking oil well in the Gulf of Mexico will "be in a position later on today to put a containment cap over the well," retired Coast Guard Adm. Thad Allen, the man in charge of the federal response team, told CNN's American Morning Monday.

He said once the cap is placed on the well, scientists will be able to gauge the pressure inside the well, then determine whether the cap is holding in the oil or if crews will need to continue siphoning oil. While robots replace the old cap, crude is leaking out. Scientists estimate that 35,000 to 60,000 barrels of oil are spewing daily from BP's breached well.

Some of the gushing oil should be collected soon, BP's Chief Operating Officer Doug Suttles said. He added that the oil-gathering ship, the Helix Producer, should begin collection of oil from the ruptured well Monday and should "ramp up to full capacity" in several days, after two setbacks Sunday delayed its implementation.

Suttles blamed the delays on problems with a hydraulic system used to operate the valve and a leak in the methanol system. But he said the Helix Producer had been set back less than a day and both issues had been resolved.

FULL STORY

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Filed under: BP • Gulf Coast Oil Spill
July 12th, 2010
01:19 PM ET

Somali Islamists claim Uganda bombings

Patrons of a Kampala, Uganda, restaurant react after a bombing Sunday.

A Somali Islamist militant movement on Monday claimed responsibility for a trio of bombings that killed at least 74 people Sunday at two venues in the Ugandan capital where crowds had gathered to watch the World Cup final.

"And the best of men have promised and they have delivered," said an Arabic statement issued by Al-Shabaab's press office. "Blessed and exalted among men - (taking) full responsibility ... We wage war against the 6,000 collaborators; they have received their response."

The 6,000 is an apparent reference to African Union peacekeepers in Somalia. Uganda contributes troops to the peacekeeping effort.

"We are behind the attack because we are at war with them," Al-Shabaab spokesman Ali Mohamoud Rage told reporters at a news conference in Mogadishu, Somalia.

FULL STORY

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Filed under: Somalia • Uganda • World
July 12th, 2010
01:15 PM ET

'Barefoot bandit' to appear in court this week

Colton Harris-Moore, 19, was taken into custody after a boat chase, police say.

The former teenage fugitive known as the "barefoot bandit" is expected to appear in court this week after authorities nabbed him in a high-speed boat chase in the Bahamas, police said.

Police said 19-year-old Colton Harris-Moore was taken into custody following the chase in the waters off Harbour Island. Authorities responded to a reported sighting of Harris-Moore just after 2 a.m. ET Sunday, said police Commissioner Ellison Greenslade.

"It is expected that he will appear in court on arraignment later this week to answer to a number of criminal charges," Greenslade said Sunday.

An account of the arrest offered by a spokeswoman for Romora Bay Resort and Marina described a dramatic capture befitting a James Bond film.

FULL STORY

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Filed under: Crime
July 12th, 2010
12:28 PM ET

Would-be suicide bombers sentenced to 20 years each

Three Britons recruited as suicide bombers in an al Qaeda-inspired plot to blow up airliners as they were flying across the Atlantic were sentenced Monday to at least 20 years in prison.

Ibrahim Savant, 29, Arafat Waheed Khan, 29, and Waheed Zaman, 26, were sentenced to life imprisonment with a minimum of 20 years for the plot, which would have used liquid explosives, Woolwich Crown Court said.

They and other conspirators planned to detonate liquid explosives stowed aboard the planes in soft drink bottles, prosecutors have said.

The foiled plot created global chaos as airports were closed and passengers stranded.

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Filed under: Al Qaeda • Terrorism
July 12th, 2010
11:54 AM ET

Sports update: Spain wins, but it's not pretty

Fans celebrate in Madrid after Spain knocked off the Netherlands in Sunday's World Cup final.

Spain captured its first World Cup trophy on Sunday, and as SI.com’s Grant Wahl writes, the prize now rests in the hands of the tournament’s top team.

Andrés Iniesta‘s title-winning goal with four minutes left in overtime gave Spain its fourth straight 1-0 victory in the Cup and made it the third team ever to simultaneously be world and European champion. Of course, the latest win certainly wasn’t pretty. The teams combined for 14 yellow cards and one red card to make it the dirtiest Cup final by far (the previous record was six yellow cards in the Argentina-West Germany final in 1986).

Next stop for the Cup: Brazil. And, writes Wahl, perhaps the teams of 2014 will follow Spain’s lead to bring out the best in the sport.

In the meantime, here’s what you can look forward to today:

MLB Home Run Derby (8 p.m. ET, ESPN)

The field is set for this year’s slugfest, and five newcomers have made their way into the lineup: American Leaguers Vernon Young, Nick Swisher and Hanley Ramirez and National Leaguers Chris Young and Corey Hart. They face stiff competition in Derby veteran David “Big Papi” Ortiz, 2006 contender Miguel Cabera and 2007 participant Matt Holliday. But let’s be honest: The only reason we watch this thing is in hopes of witnessing a repeat of 2008, when the Rangers’ Josh Hamilton pelted a record 28 homers in the first round before succumbing to the Twins’ Justin Morneau in the final round.

Tour de France, Stage 9 (7 a.m ET, Versus)

Today's 204-kilometer leg of the Tour de France is considered the toughest stage in the Alps. 204 km. It has four mountain passes, including the Col de la Madeleine, and is expected to separate the strongest riders from the rest of the pack.

Lance Armstrong's bid for an eighth win in the Tour de France came to a sorry end Sunday on a dramatic eighth stage won by Andy Schleck of Luxembourg. Australia's Cadel Evans took over the race leader's yellow jersey, leading Schleck by just 20 seconds, with defending champion Alberto Contador in third place, one minute and one second down.

NBA Summer Leagues (ESPN 3, NBA TV)

The games are under way, and this year’s draft picks, as well as a handful of veterans, are going head-to-head, hoping to make their names known before the 2010-11 season kicks off. No 1. pick John Wall made his debut Sunday night against the Warriors, and he’ll return to the court today at 10:30 p.m. ET to face Eric Bledsoe and the Clippers.

So far, Devin Ebanks, who was picked 43rd overall by the Lakers, has scaled the Rookie Ladder after dropping 21 and 24 points in two straight games. L.A. faces the Knicks today at 4 p.m.

Among the other top draftees putting their talents on display are No. 5 Demarcus Cousins, whose Kings face the Pistons at 6 p.m. ET, and No. 4 Wesley Johnson, whose Timberwolves take on the Spurs at 6:30 p.m.

BY THE NUMBERS

99

Age of Bob Sheppard, the legendary Yankees announcer, who died Sunday. Sheppard, who was nicknamed “The Voice of God,” started with the Yankees in April 1951 and announced his last game in September 2007. Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter still uses a recording of Sheppard’s voice for his introduction.

8-0

The World Cup record of Paul the octopus, who accurately predicted the victors in each of Germany’s seven matchups in the Cup, as well as the Spain-Netherlands final.

61st

Lance Armstrong’s finish in Stage 8 of the Tour de France. The seven-time champion got caught up in three crashes along the way to finish 12 minutes back. His shot at another victory in his 13th and final Tour is gone.

July 12th, 2010
10:29 AM ET

On the Radar:

Patrons at a Kampala, Uganda, restaurant react after a bombing Sunday.

Uganda blasts: More than 70 people, including an American rugby player, were killed Sunday in Uganda by bombings that Islamic terrorists are suspected to have staged, authorities said. The explosions ripped through two venues where crowds were watching the World Cup. At least 71 other people were hospitalized, police spokeswoman Judith Nabakooba said.

"If you want to fight, why don't you attack soldiers or military barracks instead of fighting innocent people watching football?" said Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni.

Uganda has worldwide oil significance, analyst Alex Vines explains.

Oil cap coming today? Crews working on the leaking oil well in the Gulf of Mexico will "be in a position later on today to put a containment cap over the well," retired Coast Guard Adm. Thad Allen, the man in charge of the federal response team, told CNN's "American Morning" on Monday.

He said once the cap is placed on the well, scientists will be able to gauge the pressure inside the well, then determine whether the cap will hold the oil or if crews will need to continue siphoning up oil to relieve pressure. While robots replace the old cap, crude is flowing freely. Allen has asked BP to conduct "integrity" testing later Monday to determine how to move forward.

'Bandit' nabbed: The former teen fugitive known as the "barefoot bandit" is expected to appear in court this week after authorities nabbed him in a high-speed boat chase in the Bahamas, police said.

Police said 19-year-old Colton Harris-Moore was taken into custody following the chase in the waters off Harbour Island. Authorities responded to a reported sighting of Harris-Moore just after 2 a.m. Sunday, said police Commissioner Ellison Greenslade.

"It is expected that he will appear in court on arraignment later this week to answer to a number of criminal charges," Greenslade said Sunday.

Fugitive director not coming to U.S.: Oscar-winning filmmaker Roman Polanski will not be extradited to the U.S. to face child sex charges, the Swiss government announced Monday. He was arrested last year, but the government confirmed he is now free.

The Swiss court rejected the American request because the U.S. did not supply the legal records Switzerland requested, and because Polanski had a reasonable right to think he would not be arrested if he visited the country, Justice Minister Eveline Widmer-Schlumpf said. U.S. prosecutors cannot request extradition again from Switzerland, but may apply to other countries to detain and extradite him, she said.

Polanski pleaded guilty in 1977 in Los Angeles, California, to having unlawful sex with a 13-year-old girl, but he fled to Europe before he was sentenced. In May, a British actress came forward and said Polanski sexually abused her after she was cast in one of his films.

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Filed under: Crime • Gulf Coast Oil Spill • Sports • Terrorism • Uganda • Uncategorized
July 12th, 2010
09:43 AM ET

A.M. Security Brief

The bomb attacks in Uganda on Sunday night point to yet another front opening up in the battle with terrorism. No group has claimed responsibility but all the signs point to a Somali connection, and specifically to al Shabaab, the al Qaeda affiliate now battling the weak Somali government.

Uganda provides the bulk of the African Union peace-keeping force in Mogadishu, a force known as AMISOM (African Union Mission in Somalia) whose main role is to keep the Somali government from being swept away by Shabaab and its allies.

Shabaab videos describe the peacekeepers as infidels and record ambushes and attacks on their vehicles. There was a devastating attack on the AMISOM headquarters last year – carried out by a Somali-American – that claimed 21 lives. And recently, the militants’ rhetoric against both Uganda and Burundi (which also provides troops for AMISOM) has become even more heated. FULL POST

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Filed under: Security Brief
July 12th, 2010
08:28 AM ET

Monday's intriguing people

zaporozhsky.gi.jpg

Alexander Zaporozhsky

The former KGB agent, convicted by a Russian court in 2003 of spying for the United States, may be headed back to Cockeysville, Maryland, where he once lived with his family. The Washington Post reports that Zaporozhsky, who had been sentenced to 18 years of hard labor, was one of four men Russia swapped for the 10 "sleeper" agents that the FBI had arrested in June.

U.S. officials told the Post that information provided by Zaporozhsky helped them catch Robert Hanssen, the FBI agent who spied for Soviet and Russian agencies for 22 years.

According to the newspaper, Zaporozhsky’s whereabouts are unknown, but his younger son, Maxim, lives in the million-dollar Cockeysville house and his older son, Paul, lives two miles away.

Ten years ago, auto dealer Scott Donahoo introduced himself to his Russian neighbor, who said he ran an import-export business out of his home.  "My guess was he was in the porn business," Donahoo said. "How else can you make dough like that?"

The Washington Post: Spy swapped in deal with Russia could return to house in Maryland suburb

CNN: Russian swapped for spies is in England, brother says

FULL POST

July 12th, 2010
08:05 AM ET

Monday's live video events

Ongoing coverage - BP webcam of Gulf oil disaster

10:00 am ET - Gulf oil disaster commission hearing - A national commission investigating the cause of the Gulf oil disaster holds its first public meeting in New Orleans.

FULL POST


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