October 11th, 2010
01:30 PM ET

Police arrest CEO in Hungary toxic sludge spill

Investigators in Hungary have arrested Zoltan Bakonyi, the chief executive of an aluminum company involved in a spill of toxic sludge that has killed eight people, authorities said Monday.

He faces charges of public endangerment and harming the environment, they said.

Five European Union experts are due to arrive in Hungary on Monday to find out how badly toxic sludge has damaged the environment and advise on decontamination, the European Union said.

And Hungarian authorities continue frantically building dikes in case the dam holding the sludge breaks further, the government said Monday.

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soundoff (8 Responses)
  1. Cyn

    What a fine, upstanding human being. :/

    October 11, 2010 at 1:42 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  2. tomcat

    It is great that Hungary has done what the US should have been doing for sometime! Maybe if we held the owners of our corporations liable than we may have safer goods.

    October 11, 2010 at 2:39 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  3. phil

    Safer goods? Like lawn darts? Imagine letting todays kids play with lawn darts or old "wacky clackers". 1/2 of them would be dead or injured in short order. Corporations are so afraid of frivilous lawsuits that the items are made as if everyone were completely stupid. Remember when childrens car seats were recalled, not because they weren't safe....because people were too stupid to install them properly. So they printed their install instructions on the 8th grade reading level and the problem was solved. But yeah, the CEO's who trade safety for profit, or who pollute wantonly, should be arrested and face criminal charges. Orrrrr not! Imagine all of the arrests BP/Shell and Haliburton execs. would face over the gulf catastrophe.

    October 11, 2010 at 3:20 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  4. La Piovra

    Civil liability and criminal charges are two separate issues. Our legal system, in general, allows for private individuals, or sometimes classes of them, to sue for money damages, a remedy the corporatocracy is always seeking to foreclose legislatively. If CEO's have ever been criminally punished, however, I haven't heard of it. It would be nice to see Massey dissolved and Don Blankenship in the juzgado for voluntary manslaughter, but until we have better laws than the best ones money can buy, don't stand on one leg waiting for it unless you want them to paint you pink and sell you for a flamingo.

    October 11, 2010 at 4:23 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  5. tomcat

    hey Phil what about potato guns? oh yeah a new favorite among kids the laser pointer fry your retna and mess with aircraft

    October 11, 2010 at 7:19 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  6. phil

    Potatoe gun? We had Mr. Potatoe head....I don't recall him being armed though. ha ha....we used to tape tennis ball cans end to end and launch flaming tennis balls with lighter fluid. What IS a po-gun tomcat?

    October 11, 2010 at 7:53 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  7. phil

    Remeber the Enron scandal? A couple of them went to jail if I recall. Their accounting firm in on the scam was Arthur Andersen. None of that bunch went to jail I don't think. They just changed their name, moved their accounting firm offshore to the Cayman Islands. (right next dooe to the outfit that makes voting machines for US) I wonder if Alcoa might use this ploy in Hungary, or if Hungarian officials would even allow such a thing.

    October 11, 2010 at 8:04 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  8. tomcat

    the old potato gun same deal as your flaming balls. lol

    October 11, 2010 at 9:54 pm | Report abuse | Reply

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