March 14th, 2011
11:22 PM ET

The day's most popular stories

The five most popular stories on CNN.com in the past 24 hours, according to NewsPulse:

Anxiety in Japan grows as rescue workers find more bodies: Rescue workers scoured tangled and displaced piles of debris Tuesday, searching for survivors, as crews struggled to keep control at a damaged nuclear plant on the fifth day of the developing disaster in Japan.

Radiation levels spike at Japanese nuclear plant: Japanese authorities trying to stave off meltdowns at an earthquake-damaged nuclear power plant reported more grim news Tuesday as radiation levels soared following another explosion at an overheating reactor.

Live blog on aftermath of Japan's earthquake, tsunami: A collection of the latest updates on Japan.

Truck driver denies he caused deadly N.Y. bus crash, source says: The driver of a tractor-trailer who passed a tour bus before it crashed denies the two vehicles clipped each other, as the bus driver has claimed, according to a law enforcement source involved in the investigation.

iReporters capture scope of quake: A collection of iReports on the earthquake and tsunami in Japan.


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Japan begins road to recovery
March 14th, 2011
10:55 PM ET

Japan's earthquake and tsunami by the numbers

A look at some key figures relating to Friday's 9.0-magnitude earthquake that hit northern Japan, triggering a tsunami that caused widespread devastation and crippled a nuclear power plant.

9.0: Magnitude of the earthquake that struck off the coast of northeastern Japan Friday, according to the U.S. Geological Survey and Japanese officials, revised from the USGS’s earlier estimate of 8.9. The new reading means the quake is tied for fourth on the U.S. survey's list of strongest earthquakes since 1900.

9.5: Magnitude of the world's largest recorded quake, which took place in Chile on May 22, 1960, according to the USGS.

8: Estimated number of feet that Japan’s main island shifted as a result of the earthquake.

2,475: The official death toll in Japan as of Tuesday morning, according to Japanese authorities. The number of dead is expected to go up as rescuers reach more hard-hit areas.

3,118: Number of people officially missing as of Tuesday morning, according to Japan’s National Police Agency.

9,500: Number of people unofficially estimated to be unaccounted for in the town of Minami Sanriku alone as of Sunday.

17,000: Number of people who normally live in Minami Sanriku.

450,000: Number of people living in shelters as of Monday, according to Japanese broadcaster NHK.

15,000: Number of people who have been rescued since the earthquake and the tsunami by Monday, according to Japan’s Kyodo News Agency, citing Prime Minister Naoto Kan.

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Filed under: 2011 tsunami • Japan
Japan quake live blog: Fire erupts in fourth reactor; radiation warning issued
This is a satellite image of the Daiichi Power Plant in Japan taken at 11:04 a.m. local time, just minutes after a reported fire there.
March 14th, 2011
07:47 PM ET

Japan quake live blog: Fire erupts in fourth reactor; radiation warning issued

An 9.0-magnitude earthquake hit northern Japan early Friday, triggering tsunamis that caused widespread devastation and crippled a nuclear power plant. Are you in an affected area? Send an iReport. Read the full report on the quake, tsunami and the fears surrounding Japan's damaged nuclear reactors.

[11:22 p.m. ET Monday, 12:24 p.m. Tuesday in Tokyo] The death toll in Japan from Friday's 9.0-magnitude earthquake and subsequent tsunami has risen to 2,475, authorities said Tuesday. At least 3,118 people were missing and 1,889 injured, according to the National Police Agency Emergency Disaster Headquarters.

[10:18 p.m. ET Monday, 11:18 a.m. Tuesday in Tokyo] Radiation levels at the damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant have increased to "levels that can impact human health," and anyone within a 30-kilometer radius of the plant should remain indoors, Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano said Tuesday. Read more on the radiation concerns.

[10:12 p.m. ET Monday, 11:12 a.m. Tuesday in Tokyo] A fire has erupted in a fourth reactor at the damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, a top adviser to Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan announced Tuesday.

[10:07 p.m. ET Monday, 11:07 a.m. Tuesday in Tokyo] The risk of further releases of radioactive material from a damaged nuclear power plant remains "very high," Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan said Tuesday.

WATCH: Prime minister warns of radiation risk

[9:43 p.m. ET Monday, 10:57 a.m. Tuesday in Tokyo] Tokyo Electric Power Co. officials say pressure readings indicate some damage to the Fukushima Daiichi plant No. 2 reactor's suppression pool, a doughnut-shaped reservoir at the base of the reactor containment vessel, A blast was reported there Tuesday morning. Water continues to be injected into "pressure vessels"  to cool down radioactive material, even though workers have been evacuated to "safer locations."

[8:57 p.m. ET Monday, 9:57 a.m. Tuesday in Tokyo] CNNMoney.com reports that Japanese stocks continued to plummet Tuesday, falling nearly 6% in the first hour of trading, as the nation continues to cope with the aftermath of last week's earthquake. The Nikkei-225 index, the most prominent measure of Tokyo market stocks, dropped 566 points, or 5.9%, within the first 60 minutes of the session. That was on top of a 6.2% drop Monday, the first full trading day after the quake.

[8:13 p.m. ET Monday, 9:13 a.m. Tuesday in Tokyo] The death toll in Japan from Friday's 9.0-magnitude earthquake and subsequent tsunami has risen to 2,414, authorities said Tuesday.  At least 3,118 people were missing and 1,885 injured, according to the National Police Agency Emergency Disaster Headquarters. The number of dead is expected to go up as rescuers reach more hard-hit areas.

WATCH: Anderson Cooper on debris that's 10 feet thick

[7:47 p.m. ET Monday, 8:47 a.m. Tuesday in Tokyo] Yukio Edano, Japan's chief Cabinet secretary, said he could not rule out the possibility of a meltdown at all three troubled reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in northeastern Japan.

While sea water was being pumped into the reactors in an effort to prevent further damage, "It cannot necessarily be called a stable situation," Edano said early Tuesday.

WATCH: News conference confirming blast

Kenneth Bergeron, a physicist who used to work at the U.S. Energy Department's Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico, said that "the release of hydrogen and the fission products (suggests) these reactors have probably had fuel rods exposed for significant periods of time."

Edano's comments come amid news about an "explosive impact" that happened Tuesday morning at the No. 2 reactor.

Cooling has been a problem for days at reactors No. 1 and 3, because the earthquake and the tsunami damaged those reactors' cooling systems. But cooling problems at No. 2 began Monday, when a blast at the building that contains No. 3 - said to be caused by a buildup of hydrogen - damaged No. 2's cooling system.

[7:17 p.m. ET Monday, 8:17 a.m. Tuesday in Tokyo] More information about the new blast at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in northeastern Japan: An "explosive impact" occurred Tuesday morning at the No. 2 reactor, a day after a hydrogen explosion rocked reactor No. 3, the plant's owner announced.

[7:09 p.m. ET Monday, 8:09 a.m. Tuesday in Tokyo] A blast has been heard at the site of the No. 2 reactor of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, according to Japanese broadcaster NHK.

[6:44 p.m. ET Monday, 7:44 a.m. Tuesday in Tokyo] The situation with Fukushima Daiichi's No. 2 nuclear reactor is not yet stable, though authorities have had some success in pumping in water in order to cool radioactive material inside, Japan's Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano said early Tuesday. He said the cooling functions at the facility's Nos. 1 and 3 nuclear reactors are serving their purpose.

Cooling problems at the No. 2 reactor on Monday allowed nuclear fuel rods to overheat and generate radioactive steam that officials will have to vent into the atmosphere. Crews thought they had the situation under control, but water levels dropped dangerously again Monday night when a buildup of steam prevented fresh seawater from entering the reactor chamber, Tokyo Electric Power Co. reported.

Workers have had trouble keeping reactors No. 1 and No. 3 cool because the earthquake and the tsunami damaged those reactors' cooling systems. But the cooling problems at No. 2 began Monday, when a blast at the building that contains No. 3 - said to be caused by a buildup of hydrogen - damaged No. 2's cooling system.

[6:39 p.m. ET Monday, 7:39 a.m. Tuesday in Tokyo] The U.S. Geological Survey has revised the magnitude of Friday's earthquake in Japan upward to 9.0 on Monday. It had previously put the magnitude at 8.9.

The new reading means the quake is tied for fourth on the U.S. survey's list of strongest earthquakes since 1900.

[6:07 p.m. ET Monday, 7:07 a.m. Tuesday in Tokyo] CNN journalists on the sense of urgency rescuers are feeling to find survivors because of unfavorable weather forecasts, which called for continued temperatures barely above freezing, as well as rain and freezing precipitation that could trigger mudslides.

Continued subnormal cold also will probably strain power generation in a country already employing rolling blackouts as a conservation measure.

[5:18 p.m. ET Monday, 6:18 a.m. Tuesday in Tokyo] Donations to help Japan have been relatively slow to come, reaching about $12 million so far, according to an early tally by the Chronicle of Philanthropy, a newspaper covering nonprofit organizations.

That number is far below the first four-day totals of other recent natural disasters, CNNMoney reports. More than $150 million was raised toward relief within four days of the crisis in Haiti, according to the Chronicle of Philanthropy. In the case of Hurricane Katrina, donations exceeded $108 million during the crucial first four days.

"Japan is not Haiti and it's not Indonesia, it's a developed country with a GDP somewhat similar to our country. It's not what people typically think of as a country in need of wide-scale international aid," said Daniel Borochoff, president of the American Institute of Philanthropy.

[4:34 p.m. p.m. ET Monday, 5:34 a.m. Tuesday in Tokyo] In the first full trading day following last week's quake, Japan's Nikkei 225 plunged 6.2% Monday. While other world markets were mostly lower, the decline was generally more muted.

In Europe, Britain's FTSE 100 ended down less than 1%, while Germany's DAX fell 1.7% and France's CAC 40 lost 1.3%. And there were even gains in Asia - Hong Kong's Hang Seng rose 0.4% Monday, while China's Shanghai Composite edged up 0.1%.

This news came as leading investors said that they expect, over the long term, the massive human disaster in Japan is unlikely to have a major impact on economic markets outside that Asian nation.

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Jihadist magazine advises women on beauty, marrying mujaheddin
March 14th, 2011
06:44 PM ET

Jihadist magazine advises women on beauty, marrying mujaheddin

For those women who felt left out by previous jihadist magazines, the people behind a new publication may think they have an answer.

The newly released Arabic-language Al-Shamikha magazine mixes advice on beauty and fashion with instruction to raise children to be ready for jihad, according to Britain’s Daily Mail and the Independent.

The magazine’s 31-page inaugural issue advises not only on how women can aspire to a fine complexion - in part by keeping their faces covered and staying indoors when possible - but also how to land a great catch of a man among the mujaheddin, according to the Independent.

Also, “readers are told it is their duty to raise children to be mujaheddin ready for jihad,” and one article tells readers to give their lives for the fight against the enemies of Islam, the Daily Mail reports.

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Filed under: Al Qaeda • Terrorism
Gotta Watch: iReporters capture scope of quake
iReporter Brent Kooi films as the ground breaks open.
March 14th, 2011
11:58 AM ET

Gotta Watch: iReporters capture scope of quake

Earth opens, shuts, gurgles – Brent Kooi explains his experience of the quake as he films the ground open and shut. Despite a seemingly composed narration, this video is anything but calm as the cracks in the earth and sidewalks gurgle up water.

[cnn-video url="http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/ireports/2011/03/14/irpt.japan.earthquake.cracks.ireport"%5D

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Filed under: 2011 tsunami • iReport • Japan
Monday's intriguing people
Coach Tad Boyle reacts during a game against the Kansas Jayhawks in the Big 12 Tournament on Friday.
March 14th, 2011
10:42 AM ET

Monday's intriguing people

Tad Boyle

The head coach of the University of Colorado Buffaloes basketball team is trying to comprehend why his team did not make the field of 68 in the NCAA tournament while trying to motivate his guys to begin play in the post-season National Invitation Tournament. Boyle was hosting a watch party at his house that was featured on the CBS broadcast that announced the brackets, and the nation saw stunned and disappointed faces as Colorado's players and coaches realized they would not be playing in the tournament.  "I had no words to console them," Boyle said afterward. "I thought we were in." He wasn't the only one.
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Tsunami aid and relief: How you can help
A tsunami smashes vehicles and houses Friday in Kesennuma in northern Japan.
March 14th, 2011
08:55 AM ET

Tsunami aid and relief: How you can help

For more information, check out CNN's "Impact Your World" section.

The world is mobilizing to help victims of Friday's 8.9-magnitude earthquake that unleashed a devastating tsunami on Japan.

The U.S. State Department is urging U.S. citizens to contact friends and family as soon as possible. They can also e-mail the State Department at JapanEmergencyUSC@state.gov. Those seeking information on security in or travel to Japan can call 1-888-407-4747 or 1-202-501-4444.

Google also is assisting in helping victims touch base with friends and loved ones. Its People Finder, which was tracking almost 153,000 records as of Monday morning, allows users to look for victims or post information about people. It works in five languages.

As myriad nations offer monetary aid, condolences and rescue teams, many people around the world are seeking ways to ease the burden on the Japanese government and people.

The humanitarian group World Vision is rushing personnel into the affected areas and providing food, water, medical supplies and shelter for victims.

It also plans to establish one or more “child-friendly spaces” for kids “affected by disasters to resume normal childhood activities and experience structure and security that are often lost following emergency situations."

Follow World Vision’s blog for updates, and visit its website or text “4japan” to 20222 to send a $10 donation to the group. It will show up on your next mobile phone bill.

The American Red Cross sent a disaster expert from Washington to Japan on Monday and the Japanese Red Cross has dispatched dozens of response teams. If you'd like to donate to the Red Cross efforts, text "redcross" to 90999, and you can make a $10 donation to the organization.

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Filed under: 2011 tsunami • Animals • Earthquake • Japan • Natural Disasters • Tsunami • World
Monday's live video events
March 14th, 2011
07:52 AM ET

Monday's live video events

CNN.com Live is your home for the latest developments from Japan, where an earthquake has devastated parts of the country.

Today's programming highlights...

Ongoing coverage - Japan earthquake aftermath

9:30 am ET - NYSE opening bell - Japan's Nikkei stock exchange took a hit on its first full day of trading following the earthquake, falling six percent.  How will Wall Street react to Japan's woes?

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Filed under: 2011 tsunami • Barack Obama • Denmark • District of Columbia • Earthquake • Japan • Natural Disasters • New York • On CNN.com today • Politics • Tsunami • U.S. • Virginia • World
March 14th, 2011
06:46 AM ET

33 killed in Afghanistan attack

A suicide attack has killed 33 people in Afghanistan's Kunduz province, a spokesman for the provincial governor, Mohibullah Saidi, said Monday.

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Filed under: Afghanistan • World