Libya live blog: Coalition confirms strike on Gadhafi compound
A four-story building at the Tripoli compound of Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi was damaged Sunday night, apparently by a coalition airstrike.
March 20th, 2011
10:53 AM ET

Libya live blog: Coalition confirms strike on Gadhafi compound

The latest developments on the situation in Libya, where coalition forces launched a series of coordinated airstrikes on Saturday after they were convinced Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi was not adhering to a cease-fire mandated by the United Nations. Read our complete story and check out our full coverage on unrest in the Arab world. Also, don't miss a gripping, high-resolution gallery of images from Libya.

[10:51 p.m. Sunday ET, 4:51 a.m. Monday in Libya] An announced list of the countries participating in the military coalition: The United States, Belgium, Britain, Canada, Denmark, France, Italy, Norway, Qatar and Spain.

U.S. officials have said they plan to hand over operational control of the military mission in coming days.

[8:55 p.m. Sunday ET, 2:55 a.m. Monday in Libya] In the following video, CNN's Nic Robertson reports on his visit to the building - in Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi's compound in Tripoli - that apparently was struck in a coalition airstrike Sunday night. (A coalition official confirmed, after Robertson's report, that it had targeted the compound.)

[8:36 p.m. Sunday ET, 2:36 a.m. Monday in Libya] A coalition military official has confirmed that Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi's compound in Tripoli was targeted by airstrikes Sunday night, CNN's Chris Lawrence reported.

The official said the compound was targeted because it contains capabilities to exercise command and control over Libyan forces and the coalition goal is to degrade his military capabilities. The official said neither Gadhafi nor his residence was the intended target.

Earlier, the Libyan government said at least one missile struck a building inside the compound Sunday night. Western journalists, including CNN's Nic Robertson, were brought inside the compound to survey the destruction.

[8:26 p.m. Sunday ET, 2:26 a.m. Monday in Libya] Oil prices jumped more than $2 a barrel in electronic trading Sunday following escalating violence in Libya, where international forces fired on Libyan defense sites, CNNMoney reported.

The benchmark U.S. contract, West Texas Intermediate, for April delivery gained $1.95 to $103.02 a barrel. The more active May contract jumped $2.08 to $103.93 a barrel.

[8:10 p.m. Sunday ET, 2:10 a.m. Monday in Libya] The Gadhafi-compound building in Tripoli that was damaged in what may have been a missile attack Sunday night is about 150 yards away from a Gadhafi building that was struck in a 1986 U.S. airstrike, CNN's Nic Robertson reported.

[7:56 p.m. Sunday ET, 1:56 a.m. Monday in Libya] A member of the Libyan opposition told CNN that the Gadhafi government collected bodies of people killed in fighting in the past week and displayed them over the weekend, trying to show they were killed by coalition airstrikes. The claim by Ahmed Gebreel, who cited eyewitnesses and medical officials, could not be verified by CNN.

The Libyan government has claimed that women, children and clerics have died in allied attacks.

[7:15 p.m. Sunday ET, 1:15 a.m. Monday in Libya] A building at Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi's compound in Tripoli was damaged by at least one missile about 2.5 hours ago, a Libyan government official tells CNN's Nic Robertson.

Robertson said government officials took him to the four-story building. The roof has collapsed, he said. Robertson said he isn't able to verify what caused the damage, but the government's timeline coincides with a blast that Robertson heard late Sunday, and the building looks as if it were hit by missiles, Robertson reported.

Robertson said he doesn't know where Gadhafi is, and that there is no evidence that he is at the compound. No one was injured in the strike on the building, a Libyan government official told Robertson.

U.S. officials earlier Sunday said they are not targeting Gadhafi.

[6:36 p.m. Sunday ET, 12:36 a.m. Monday in Libya] President Obama and his national security team made phone calls Sunday to try to shore up support in Arab governments for the military mission in Libya, with top White House aides reaching out to officials of the Arab League to insist the bombing does not exceed the scope of a U.N. mandate, according to senior administration officials.

The lobbying came after Arab League officials complained earlier Sunday that airstrikes in Libya by the U.S. military and allies went beyond instituting a no-fly zone, CNN's Ed Henry reports. The senior officials said the Obama team stressed to the Arab League that bombing Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi's air defenses falls within the U.N. Security Council resolution's scope of imposing a no-fly zone and taking "all necessary measures" to stop the dictator from attacking civilians in his own country.

[5:57 p.m. Sunday ET, 11:57 p.m. in Libya] Defense Secretary Robert Gates said Sunday that the Libyan operation is off to a "a strong and successful start" but he warned against widening the goals of the mission beyond what was spelled out in the United Nations Security Council resolution. Gates spoke from aboard a U.S. military aircraft en route to Russia.

[5:40 p.m. Sunday ET, 11:40 p.m. in Libya] Reacting to the Libyan military's calling a cease-fire with rebels, a British prime minister's office spokesman drew attention to the Libyan government's previous call for a cease-fire, made Friday.

"Everyone will recall that in recent days Col. Gadhafi declared a ceasefire which was promptly violated," the 10 Downing Street spokesman said. "We said then we would judge him on his actions not his words - and we will do so again.

"His obligations are very clearly set out by the U.N. Security Council resolution. Our assessment is that he is in breach of these obligations so we will continue to enforce the resolution."

The Libyan government had called for a cease-fire with rebels on Friday. Rebels and Western governments, however, said the Libyan military continued to fight against the opposition, leading to the international coalition's airstrikes and no-fly-zone implementation on Saturday night.

[5:35 p.m. Sunday ET, 11:35 p.m. in Libya] More on U.S. Vice Adm. Bill Gortney comments on Gadhafi: Gortney was asked about reports of smoking rise from the area of Gadhafi's palace. Gortney said: "We are not targeting his residence."

[5:16 p.m. Sunday ET, 11:16 p.m. in Libya] In his press briefing earlier this afternoon, U.S. Vice Adm. Bill Gortney emphasized that the international coalition's air campaign is not deisgned to target Gadhafi, but is limited to enforcing a no-fly zone and preventing Gadhafi's forces from further pressing rebel positions.

"We are not going after Gadhafi," Gortney said at the Pentagon. "Regime forces are more pressed and less free to maneuver."

Despite Libyan government contentions that women, children and clerics have died in allied attacks, Gortney and other officials said that's not the case. "We have no indication of any civilian casualties," the admiral said.

[4:47 p.m. Sunday ET, 10:47 p.m. in Libya] Reacting to the Libyan military's call Sunday night for an immediate cease-fire, a spokesman for the U.S. military's Africa Command said that "we have to wait and see if it's genuine."

"We urge the Libyan government to do everything it can to demonstrate its sincerity," U.S. Africa Command spokesman Vince Crawley told CNN.

The Libyan government previously had called for a cease-fire with rebels on Friday. Rebels and Western governments, however, said the Libyan military continued to fight against the opposition, leading to the international coalition's airstrikes and no-fly-zone implementation on Saturday night.

Gadhafi's forces shelled opposition forces in the west of the country on Sunday before the call for the cease-fire was made, according to rebels.

[4:42 p.m. Sunday ET, 10:42 p.m. in Libya] Anti-Gadhafi forces are heartened by international coalition attacks that smashed a convoy of about 70 military vehicles belonging to pro-Gadhafi forces outside of Benghazi on Sunday. But they are increasingly concerned that pro-government elements within Benghazi's population will carry out intimidation campaigns and targeted assassinations of opposition leaders in the rebel stronghold in eastern Libya, CNN's Arwa Damon reports.

[4:34 p.m. Sunday ET, 10:34 p.m. in Libya] Senator Richard Lugar, R-Indiana, has questioned the decision by the United States to pursue military action in Libya without clearly defined objectives, and expressed concern over the role of the U.S. in Libya's future.

"Where does our involvement stop?" Lugar, the ranking Republican on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, asked. "This is why, before it begins, we ought to have a plan and we ought to have outcomes defined as to why American forces, American money are going to be at stake."

[4:23 p.m. Sunday ET, 10:23 p.m. in Libya] U.S. House Speaker John Boehner has released a sharply worded statement in Washington pressing President Barack Obama to lay out more detail about the administration's goals in Libya.

"Before any further military commitments are made, the administration must do a better job of communicating to the American people and to Congress about our mission in Libya and how it will be achieved," Boehner said in the prepared statement.

Shortly after Boehner's statement was released, Obama - who is in Brazil - said in a speech that the people of Libya have taken "a courageous stand against a regime determined to brutalize its own citizens."

"Across the region, we have seen young people rise up – a new generation demanding the right to determine their own future," added Obama. "From the beginning, we have made clear that the change they seek must be driven by their own people."

[4:08 p.m. Sunday ET, 10:08 p.m. in Libya] At least two explosions could be heard moments ago in Libya's capital, and anti-aircraft fire has followed, CNN's Nic Robertson reported.

[4:06 p.m. Sunday ET, 10:06 p.m. in Libya] Coalition strikes have been "very effective in significantly degrading the regime's air defense capability," U.S Vice Adm. William Gortney said in a briefing Sunday.

[3:37 p.m. Sunday ET, 9:37 p.m. in Libya] The United States and Britain have now fired a total of 124 Tomahawk missiles at Libya's air defense sites since strikes began Saturday night, Africa Command spokesman Vince Crawley says.

[3:04 p.m. Sunday ET, 9:04 p.m. in Libya] The Libyan military has called for an immediate cease-fire, an army spokesman announced Sunday.

The Libyan government previously had called for a cease-fire with rebels on Friday. Rebels and Western governments, however, said the Libyan military continued to fight against the opposition, leading to the international coalition's airstrikes and no-fly-zone implementation on Saturday night.

[2:27 p.m. Sunday ET, 8:27 p.m. in Libya] Libya initiated anti-aircraft fire into the Tripoli sky Sunday night, though an attack by allied forces was not apparent, CNN's Nic Robertson reported.

[2:04 p.m. Sunday ET, 8:05 p.m. in Libya] A senior doctor at the medical center in Benghazi, Libya, confirmed Sunday that 95 people were killed and an unknown number injured in Saturday's assault on the city by pro-Gadhafi forces.

[1:53 p.m. Sunday ET, 7:53 p.m. in Libya] U.S. President Barack Obama participated in a secure conference call and received a briefing on U.S. military operations in Libya on Sunday morning, the White House said in a statement.

[1:34 p.m. Sunday ET, 7:24 p.m. in Libya] The Arab League was holding an emergency session at its headquarters in Cairo, Egypt. Hisham Youssef, Arab League Chief of Staff, told CNN, "We are currently studying the situation and evaluating the air strikes to be able to decide." He said the League has not "taken any stand or reached a final decision." Read more about the Arab League and its role in the Libyan crisis. Watch CNN's Reza Sayah discuss the Arab League.

[1:15 p.m. Sunday ET,  7 p.m. in Libya] Qatar has offered to send four fighter planes to the coalition effort, the French Defense Ministry said.

[11:45 a.m. Sunday ET, 5:45 p.m. in Libya] Italy announced that as of midnight Sunday, four Tornado warplanes and four F-16s will be made available.

[11:00 a.m. Sunday ET, 5 p.m. in Libya] A critique of the U.S. involvement in the military intervention in Libya that will no doubt be common in coming days is that the Obama administration is making a large error by embarking on a war with a third Muslim country, as if reversing Moammar Gadhafi's momentum against the rebels will be a rerun of the debacle of the war against Saddam Hussein. Peter Bergen explains why what's happening Libya isn't the same as what happened in Iraq.

[10:45 a.m. Sunday ET, 4:45 p.m. in Libya] Russia urged coalition nations to stop the use of force against Libya, challenging the use of the U.N. no-fly zone resolution as a "controversial step." In a statement published on its website, Russia's Foreign Ministry said air strikes carried out by coalition forces killed 48 civilians and injured 150.

[10 a.m. Sunday ET, 4 p.m. in Libya] Turkey will serve as a "protecting power" for the United States in Libya, senior State Department officials told CNN. As a protecting power, Turkey will represent the United States in Libya, including acting as consular officers on behalf of U.S. citizens in Libya and looking after American diplomatic facilities in the country. Turkey can also pass messages between the U.S. and Libya. Full story

[8:23 a.m. Sunday ET, 2:23 p.m. in Libya] A military convoy near Benghazi in eastern Libya was destroyed by multiple airstrikes, leaving charred bodies, tanks and trucks, CNN's Arwa Damon reported from the scene.

- A no-fly zone in Libya is "effectively in place," U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Adm. Mike Mullen told CNN.

[6:53 a.m. Sunday ET, 12:53 p.m. in Libya] Forces loyal to Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi were shelling the city of Misrata on Sunday, using tanks, artillery and cannons, a witness said. Rebels in the city were fighting back, the witness said. There was no immediate word on casualties.

[6:36 a.m. Sunday ET, 12:36 p.m. in Libya] Nineteen U.S. warplanes, including stealth bombers and fighter jets, conducted strike operations in Libya on Sunday morning. The warplanes included Marine Corps Harrier Jets, Air Force B-2 stealth bombers, and F-15 and F-16 fighter jets, according to Lt. Cmdr. James Stockman of U.S. Africa Command. It is the next phase in the operation that started Saturday with the launch of more than 110 Tomahawk Cruise missiles from U.S. and British warships and subs.

[5:40 a.m. Sunday ET, 11:40 a.m. in Libya] In another defiant speech, Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi promised "a long-drawn war" after international airstrikes in his country by the United States and allies.

"You have proven to the world that you are not civilized, that you are terrorists - animals attacking a safe nation that did nothing against you," Gadhafi said in a televised speech.

Throughout the address, an image of a golden fist crushing a model plane that said "USA" filled the screen.

Gadhafi said the strikes was a confrontation between the Libyan people and "the new Nazis."

"If the men are killed, then the women will take over. They will hold the green flag high," he said.

[5:35 a.m. Sunday ET, 11:35 a.m. in Libya] An eyewitnesses in Misrata claims there is heavy artillery and tank fire under way in the town. The eyewitness also claims no aircraft have been seen or heard.

[5:26 a.m. Sunday ET, 11:26 a.m. in Libya] Libyan TV has announced that Moammar Gadhafi "will address the Libyan people shortly to address the nation concerning the assault of the crusaders against the people of Libya."

[1:10 a.m. Sunday ET, 7:10 a.m. in Libya] Fighter jets were seen flying over the Libyan city of Benghazi on Sunday morning. It was not immediately clear who the fighter jets belonged to.

China's foreign ministry expressed regret over the military strike on Libya and said it does not agree with use of force in international relations.

The Spanish armed forces will send four F-18 planes, a refueling plane, an F-100 frigate, a submarine and a maritime surveillance aircraft to Libya.

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez denounced the military intervention in Libya, and slammed the United States and the United Nations. "They (the U.S.) want to appropriate the oil in Libya; they don't care about anyone's life in that region," he said, according to Venezuelan state media. "When have they cared about the lives in those places if they keep on bombing Iran and Afghanistan?"

A defiant Gadhafi said Libya will fight back against undeserved "naked aggression." His military claimed nearly 50 people, including, women, children and clerics, were killed in Saturday evening's attacks.

American, French and British military forces, convinced that Gadhafi was not adhering to a United Nations-mandated cease-fire, hammered Libyan military positions with missiles and fighter jets in the first phase of an operation that will include enforcement of a no-fly zone.

French fighter jets deployed over Libya fired at a military vehicle Saturday, the first strike against Gadhafi's military forces, which earlier attacked the rebel stronghold of Benghazi.

Gadhafi, speaking early Sunday on Libyan state TV, said the U.N. charter provides for Libya's right to defend itself in a "war zone." Weapons depots will be opened, he said.

U.S. President Barack Obama authorized U.S. military force from Brazil on what happened to be the eighth anniversary of the start of the war in Iraq.

In the next few days, U.S. military officials expect to hand over control to a coalition commander. Canada and Italy also are part of the coalition.


soundoff (685 Responses)
  1. PeggyG

    Why is nobody asking the question of who in the international community is supplying the ammunition, weapons, and firepower to Libya and that that country needs to stop doing so? I fail to understand why this is not a question being asked very prominently in the media and by the UN? The country who is their supplier needs to be stopped as well.

    March 20, 2011 at 2:01 am | Report abuse |
    • Brianw

      I'm certain that Libya had plenty of ammunition stockpiled. More than enough to support a war for a month or two. He has been preparing for this for a very long time. As o most dictators

      March 20, 2011 at 2:32 am | Report abuse |
    • cput

      Daffy also kept billions of dollars in cash to pay off his mercenaries.

      March 20, 2011 at 2:32 am | Report abuse |
    • Jen Amirgholi

      That is an excellent question. I bet Iran is behind it, I do not know for sure, but it seems like people will supply you with anything if you have the money.

      March 20, 2011 at 2:45 am | Report abuse |
    • Uncle Cecil

      The problem isn't weapons, it's Moammar Gadhafi's inability to manage Libya! The man has obviously lost his mind–he's lived a very wild life of drugs and alcohol abuse. He's at the bottom-of-the-barrel in the catigory of leadership.

      March 20, 2011 at 2:57 am | Report abuse |
    • AutoPilot

      Well, Peggy, the U.S. Governments State Department green-lighted a $76.7 million deal in 2009 that would have upgraded at least 50 U.S.-built armored troop transports for the Libyan army.

      March 20, 2011 at 3:14 am | Report abuse |
    • not a sheeple

      PeggyG – It's obvious this is clearly caused by guns bought at US gun shows being snuck across the border and we need to ban gun shows to prevent him from getting more guns

      I

      March 20, 2011 at 3:52 am | Report abuse |
    • Rosana

      Very well put. Who is giving that man arms? This Ghadafi has gone mad. Can you imagine if people sell him nuclear weapons? He has got too much money and can buy or exchange for oil. It´s necessary to find out immediately who is selling the ammunition, weapons, and firepower to Libia.

      March 20, 2011 at 3:59 am | Report abuse |
    • LIL J D_TOWN

      Gun shows can be presented negatively, but people that can't be the reason of arms to Libya. The question should be " Is the Global Community finally realizing the negative affects of radicalism throughout the world? War is evil and if all Countries would put their foot down and go to save all women and children and stop all these tragedies. Women are being persucated to stupid reasons, and I know this might be for religious reasons. But THIS ISN'T THE 14TH CENTURY ANYMORE SO LET ALL WORLD HUMANS HAVE THEIR RIGHTS, CUZ ONE DAY IT'S GONNA COME BACK TO ALL LIVING ORGANISMS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. JUST ANOTHER DISTRACTION TO THE ONGOING EVENTS IN THE HOUSE AND SENATE THAT ARE TAKING AWAY OUR RIGHTS LITTLE BY LITTLE, AND TO THE STUPIDITY OF SOME MEMBERS OF CONGRESS FOR WASTEFUL SPENDING. CONGRESS IS IN CHARGE OF THE MONEY, NOT JUST THE FED RESERVE, SO FINALLY AMERICANS AREN'T UNITED AS ONE, AND UNTIL WE UNITE FOR FAMILY ETHICS, GOOD MORALS, AND ENVIRONMENTAL PRESERVANCE, WE ARE ALL DOOMED. EVERYONE!!!!!!

      March 20, 2011 at 4:49 am | Report abuse |
    • john

      READ THE BOOK OF REVELATION

      March 20, 2011 at 5:50 am | Report abuse |
    • Colonel

      PALA JE ADZBADIJA, PASCE I BENGAZI, PUKOVNIK GADAFI SVE PRED SOBOM GAZI
      IZDAJNICI LIBIJSKI U EGIPAT BEZE, OKO BENGAZIJA OBRUC SE SAD STEZE
      USTALA JE SRBIJA, SVAKI SRBIN VICE, IDEMO DO POBEDE DRUZE PUKOVNICE..
      A VELIKI PUKOVNIK BANDI TRN U OKU, BANDU CE POBEDITI, ZAKLATI KO STOKU
      VODJA REVOLUCIJE PUKOVNIK MUAMER, NECE CITAV OSTATI NITI JEDAN AMER
      PUKOVNIK JE LEGENDA PREDATI SE NECE, VOLI SVOJU ZEMLJU I ZA NJU UMRECE
      PUKOVNICE SADA POVEDI SVET U SLAVU, DA KONACNO SKINEMO TOJ AZDAJI GLAVU
      UPLASILA AMERE NJEGOVA HARIZMA, A PUKOVNIK KAZE BICE KATAKLIZMA
      LEGENDA O NJEMU SIRI SE U SVETU, STAO JE PRED ONE STO KARAJU PLANETU
      PUKOVNICE BRATE TI SI NASA NADA, SRBI SU UZ TEBE NEK SE JEBE VLADA
      NJEMU JE SLOBODA VAZNIJA OD SVEGA, ZATO TREBA SVI DA STANEMO UZ NJEGA
      NAROD JE UZ NJEGA, LIBIJA SE BRANI, SAMO GAZI PUKOVNICE NEK CRKNU DUSMANI

      March 20, 2011 at 7:00 am | Report abuse |
    • sparknut

      Oil money makes buying weapons easy.

      March 20, 2011 at 7:37 am | Report abuse |
    • Tellmenolies

      Peggy,you can rest assured that the UN knows exactly who the weapons are coming from...these things aren't secret to the intelligence community..for the public just look at the countries that abstained from the UN vote,that is a starting point...

      March 20, 2011 at 7:50 am | Report abuse |
    • THILLSMAX

      EXCELLENT QUESTIONS. GHAHAFI'S MILITARY SUPPLIES CAN NOT BE UNLIMITED ALBEIT THEIR AMUNITIONS MAY NOT BE AT DEPLETED LEVELS AND COULD BE SIGNIFICANT FOR A LONG DRAWN OUT CONFRINTATION.
      YOUR QUESTION ABOUT WHO IS THE SUPPLIER IS STILL RELEVANT SINCE GHAHAFI IS A KNOWN TERRORIST AND SHOULD BE ON SOME KIND OF U.N. NO SELL ZONE LIST WITH SIGNIFICANT CONSEQUENCES TO VIOLATORS.

      March 20, 2011 at 7:53 am | Report abuse |
    • Jackbutt

      Gee PeggyG....they should have asked that same question about Iraq and Afganistan. The US knows where those arms are coming from but doesn't do a thing about it . Why should they now?

      March 20, 2011 at 7:59 am | Report abuse |
    • MC

      Well, it was the good 'ol USA that sold weapons to Libya! As usual!

      March 20, 2011 at 8:17 am | Report abuse |
    • Arne

      With an arms embargo in place NO ONE is supplying arms right now. As for his existing stockpiles, ammo dumps and fuel supply depots are going to be targeted for air strikes along with and truck convoys trying to move these plus food and water to the front lines. This is his army's Achilles Heel. They have a long and very vulnerable supply line chain reaching from Tripoli to Sirte to Benghazi which will be hammered from the air. Three Part Strategy: Destroy Depots, Deny Front Line Troops Supplies, and Isolate Front Line Troops from Reinforcement. It is a hopeless and unwinnable position and will only prolong the suffering. HE IS A MADMAN.

      March 20, 2011 at 8:54 am | Report abuse |
    • Robert

      Forgive me but I don't understand why we are involved at all. This is a civil war internal to Libya. We shouldn't be involved except for the fact we (1) have always hated Gaddafi and (2) we have an interest in the oil coming from there. If they came over here and did what we are doing to them we would be outraged. (For those who want to bring up the killing of civilians, think Kent State, other freedom events). What also bothers me is that for the reasons we give, why aren't we involved in Yemen, Bahrain, Tunisia, etc. Like I said, this is entirely an internal civil matter, we have no business being involved.

      March 20, 2011 at 9:00 am | Report abuse |
    • Brian

      He stockpiled that stuff from the Soviets back in the day.

      March 20, 2011 at 9:34 am | Report abuse |
    • Ryan W

      I think it's important to remember history so we don't repeat it. The holocaust and other genocides should be stopped if other nations can agree. US gives weapons when needed for so many reasons sometimes they turn on allies. I can't imagine the international relations involved in situations like this. Russia, Iran,China, or the US could be supporting the army. We don't want to fight any of them.

      March 20, 2011 at 9:35 am | Report abuse |
    • SSampson

      I agree – but the list of countries that supply other countries is a long one – it includes ourselves and most of our friends and allies – Of course it also includes a long list of our 'enemies' also....

      Almost all countries that build, sell... Most companies are on the stock market, and they need to sell to earn us money and pay our 401K investments....

      But these words just brush the surface and make some generalizations..... The issue is quite complex and actually quite scary

      I can tell you one thing for sure.... It really makes you feel lousy when you capture a pile of munitions from a bunch of people that were just shooting at you....a stockpile you KNOW killed some of your friends or fellow soldiers.... and you find a bunch of stuff with US markings on it.... Makes you feel So glad those AIG type guys made money investing in companies that sell the stuff while they sit on their butts comfortably at home....

      March 20, 2011 at 9:53 am | Report abuse |
    • C.I.A.

      It must be from The Triad of Terrorist Nations namely, China Iran and Afghanistan.

      Like the crisis in North Korea, US must be extra careful in handling the situation in Libya. These countries specially China, are not only supporting logistics to Libya but also are there to ruin the reputation of the United States ready to name the latter as War Criminal.

      China must be removed from U.N., it is their Judas to Jesus.

      March 20, 2011 at 9:51 pm | Report abuse |
  2. Macmaven

    If you've been keeping up with current events, there have been import sanctions already placed on Libya set forth by the European nations and the US. This was done a couple weeks ago. Surely you understand that they have weapons stockpiled throughout the country.

    March 20, 2011 at 2:06 am | Report abuse |
  3. chris

    damn...Uk,US,Spain,Canada,France,Russia, and Italy are all gonna kick this dudes ass, he will be dead in days.

    March 20, 2011 at 2:13 am | Report abuse |
    • Sean

      Where does it say anything about the Russians being involved in this? Russia along with 4 other countries from the security council abstained from voting on resolution 1973.

      March 20, 2011 at 2:59 am | Report abuse |
    • Nick84

      The Russian government is as slimy and hypocritical as ever. They abstained from the resolution vote and have spoken out unfavorably regarding the current military action. I would trust Iranians well before I would trust Russians.

      March 20, 2011 at 7:46 am | Report abuse |
    • Stevelb1

      Russia and China are always on the wrong side. It's amazing, they support every ruthless dictator.

      March 20, 2011 at 2:23 pm | Report abuse |
    • C.I.A.

      Yeah...China and Russia to U.S. is like Judas and Peter to Jesus respectively.

      Or, China and Russia to the U.N. is like Judas and Peter to the Church.

      Therefore, they must be removed from the Alliance, specially China.

      March 20, 2011 at 10:01 pm | Report abuse |
  4. rwbeagle

    Let's protect the Libyan people and bomb by bombing them...Brilliant Mr. President.

    March 20, 2011 at 2:20 am | Report abuse |
    • Mclovin

      Waiting for the neocon response that this is President Obama's fault. Yes, rwbeagle what would you have the President do to stop the slaughter of civilians by the Libyan dictator? What? If he did nothing I bet you would say h eis a coward and obviously not fit to lead. You see, for neocons, if he did not support this action he is coward, if he supports this action he is bombing civilians and a warmonger and since he doesn't support immediate drilling for oil that would take years he is obviously the reason gas prices are high. It is reaching epic historic proportions. The full moon is President Obama's fault. The cricket that died today in my backyard is obviously President Obama's fault. LOL It never ends.... pathetic

      March 20, 2011 at 2:37 am | Report abuse |
    • Tpinnocky

      Gadhafi is bombing civilian positions. The coalition is attacking air force infrastructure. Try to keep itnstraight.

      March 20, 2011 at 2:46 am | Report abuse |
    • nonrepublican

      So if American people took demanded Obama and Congress to leave – they would just leave? or if people took arms to tried to do it by force Obama wouldnt send troops?

      March 20, 2011 at 3:14 am | Report abuse |
    • mab2261

      nonrepublican, are you seriously trying to say that the situation in Libya could in any way be replicated in the U.S.? Libya has been ruled by a madman for the last 42 years. There is no democratic or parliamentary system that would allow him to be voted out of office. The people do not need to take up arms against Obama because they can vote him out–or he will only be allowed to serve two terms. We have a functioning system here that has its flaws, true, but it enables us to voice our dissent. After decades of living in fear, the people of Libya have finally risen up to depose him. Please do not discount their sacrifice by implying that it is natural for a government to stem a violent uprising. You clearly have no idea about Libyan history, or even American history, for that matter. Perhaps you have forgotten the American Revolutionary War? That was, by the way, how we earned our right to choose our government.

      March 20, 2011 at 3:42 am | Report abuse |
    • Nick84

      nonrepublican, though i understand the ridiculous comparison you are making, i do kindly ask that you say what you type aloud before you read it. or learn how to spell, whatever the issue is.

      March 20, 2011 at 7:49 am | Report abuse |
  5. cput

    AIRO (NewsCore) – Egypt freed Mohammed al Zawahiri, brother of al Qaeda number two Ayman, on Thursday under an amnesty for political prisoners ordered by the transitional military government, security officials said. In other words – the Egyptian military council freed the brother of Al Qaeda's 2nd top commander, along with 700 other prisioners. What is wrong with this picture?

    March 20, 2011 at 2:25 am | Report abuse |
    • Abbas

      My God, this is very scary.... Where is Egypt headed? An old Afghanistan?

      March 20, 2011 at 2:43 am | Report abuse |
    • Shawn Irwin

      I don't see where him being the brother of a terrorist makes him guilty. It is ridiculus to assume that, unless you can provide some type of proof that he is guilty of doing something . . .

      March 20, 2011 at 3:42 am | Report abuse |
    • Nick84

      reminds me of that time Bush let half the bin Laden clan (Al Qaedas number ONE) hang out in our country after 9-11.

      March 20, 2011 at 7:51 am | Report abuse |
  6. Rich

    In case you haven't notice Peggy, the Libian army is using Russian made tanks so I would say they are getting their weapons from Russia and probably China too.

    March 20, 2011 at 2:26 am | Report abuse |
  7. mikeklein2010

    It may be late in the game, but not too late to turn the tide. I'm sure Delta force went into Tripoli and Ben Gaazi before the air assault to help the anti=Quadaffi forces. Another week or two of intense CNN watching is in our future.

    March 20, 2011 at 2:27 am | Report abuse |
    • Chris

      IS THAT HOW IT WORKS? THAT'S INTERESTING.

      March 20, 2011 at 5:44 am | Report abuse |
  8. cput

    Hey out there..... Doesn't it bother anybody that Egypt just released the brother of Al Qaeda's 2nd top commander? This dude was in prision in Eqypt for 10 years and now he is free........

    March 20, 2011 at 2:36 am | Report abuse |
    • Jenn

      Holy Cow. Why in the hell did they do that.

      March 20, 2011 at 2:53 am | Report abuse |
    • sfawzy

      it was not 10 years but it was 35 years he was sentanced for 25 but was not realeased for an unknown reason when he finished his jail time. i dont like him being realsed but this is the law and it has to be prespected....... dont you think!?

      March 20, 2011 at 3:04 am | Report abuse |
    • Chris

      (YEAH – LOOKS LIKE YOU GOTTA KNOW YOUR FACTS PAL.)

      March 20, 2011 at 5:45 am | Report abuse |
  9. Abraham

    Does the UN Charter really say that the UN can't intervene in internal affairs?

    March 20, 2011 at 2:39 am | Report abuse |
    • Chris

      IT DOES. HE'S RIGHT

      March 20, 2011 at 5:46 am | Report abuse |
    • Nick84

      it also says that the self-determination of a people is a human right. sometimes these guidelines conflict, and its up to the security council to make an assessment at the time. they did, and they are correct i feel

      March 20, 2011 at 7:54 am | Report abuse |
  10. Abbas

    I wounder if we will find Gaddafi in a rat hole like his buddy Saddam??!!
    Will Iran be next?? The Iranian people hate their government and want freedom too.

    March 20, 2011 at 2:39 am | Report abuse |
    • Jenn

      Gosh, that is too funny. A repeat.

      March 20, 2011 at 2:51 am | Report abuse |
    • Willie Viljoen

      The same is happening in Zimbabwe. The previous president of South Africa, Thabo Mbeki waisted millions with his friend Gadaffi, trying to establish an United States of Africa and is great friends with Robert Mugabe of Zimbabwe, also a dictator who is killing his own people. Millions have fled for their lives into South Africa. In a hidden way the South African white farmers are also being killed on their farms on an ongoing basis. The ANC Goverment, friends of Mugabe, is just defying the truth. Will the UN react on that aswell?

      March 20, 2011 at 4:58 am | Report abuse |
  11. Martha

    Dammit Obama. You're all no better than Bush. Let's see. Guantanmo still open and another War. Great.

    "Support" my butt. ...since when did "support" start with headlines that read "U.S., allies strike targets in Libya".

    We didn't need to interfere in this war. This was none of our business. When people "riot", they need to be controlled. Any reasonable country would do the same. The media hype was the only thing that made it look bigger than it actually was in my opinion.

    March 20, 2011 at 2:40 am | Report abuse |
    • heidi

      right, martha, and i suppose you are one of those people that walk past an old lady getting mugged because it's none of your business?

      March 20, 2011 at 3:27 am | Report abuse |
    • Chris

      MARTHA'S TAKEN A LOT OF ABUSE FOR SAYING THE ABOVE BUT THERE IS A POINT TO ALL SHE SAYS. I HOPE QUADDAFFI DIES BUT THE US GETTING INVOLVED IN ANOTHER ARAB-COUNTRY WAR IS INSANE AND AGAINST THE UN CHARTER AND HONESTLY, AS QUADAFFI SAYS, WHAT WOULD YOU GUYS DO IN THE STATES? YOU'D SWAT TEAM THE CROWD WITH SNIPERS LIKE AT ATTICA OR THE 'MOVE' COMMUNE THE MOMENT IT EVEN LOOKED AT AN ARMORY. NO DOUBT. DONT TELL ME IM WRONG COS I AINT.
      BUT MARTHA, OBAMA IS BEING AS RESTRAINED AS HE CAN. HE IS GENERALLY FOR PEACE BUT HE HAS TO GET INVOLVED HERE – HE CAN'T STAND BY WITH THIS HAPPENNING

      March 20, 2011 at 5:51 am | Report abuse |
    • Tellmenolies

      Martha,you can't really be so dumb...this is not a riot...it is a revolution by citizens of a country that has lived under a corrupt,cruel regime for 41 years...libya is a member of the UN and therefore must abide by UN sanctions,even the Arab League was in on this one...

      March 20, 2011 at 7:45 am | Report abuse |
    • Ganache

      Do you really think the US will open fire and bomb the crap out of US civilians? Ghadafi's a freakin' barbarian. If he was a decent human being things would not have escalated to this level.

      March 20, 2011 at 7:53 am | Report abuse |
    • Bilbo

      Have to agree. The organisors of this crusade are oozing double standards. It just so happens that Gadhafi is on their hit list. What about the abuses going on in Bahrain right now? Oh ... that's right, the USA has a fleet stationed their. Nice one.

      March 20, 2011 at 8:46 am | Report abuse |
    • Robert

      Martha is dead on right. This is none of our business, it is an internal civil matter.

      Tellmenolies – Martha isn't being dumb. It is a revolution by citizens of a country – PERIOD. It may be a cruel regime but it is still their internal affair. Libya is a sovereign country and it is not our place to interfere. Who made America the Police force of the world?

      Americans have a delusion that everybody should live like us and wants to. We spent how many millions getting Nortegia our of Panama and then given "American democracy" they vote him back into office!! Not everybody wants our form of government. Many do not understand it nor want it.

      I say stay out until we have a justifiable reason, and we don't yet. As I said above, if Libya or somebody else came in and did to America what we are doing to them, we would be outraged.

      March 20, 2011 at 9:13 am | Report abuse |
    • Jim

      Martha and Robert I agree! Lets stop being the police of the world.
      When is O bama going to take care of his own people. Have you bought groceries lately or bought gas, have you looked for a job? Take care of the people that voted for you ( not me ), then go play your we'll take care of the world game.

      March 20, 2011 at 10:03 am | Report abuse |
  12. Sean

    The reporting on that video was God awful with all due respect. Why is it that CNN domestic American reporting, frankly, sucks, while its international reporting for various international markets are frankly, awesome (well rounded, contextual, earnest and intelligent reporters)? If CNN truly wants to grow domestic market share, then they ought to leverage their international operations into the domestic market...

    March 20, 2011 at 2:44 am | Report abuse |
  13. Qaddafi

    Why are you guys bombing me? Why is it that everyone hates clowns nowadays? Stop it or I swear I will go Charlie Sheen on your behinds 🙂

    xoxo

    March 20, 2011 at 2:45 am | Report abuse |
    • Sal Bundallah

      Duh!!! Winning!

      March 20, 2011 at 4:21 am | Report abuse |
    • Chris

      NO NO – NOT CHARLIE SHEEN! WAIT. DOES THAT MEAN WE ALL GET TO SCREW TWO BLONDES AT THE SAME TIME?...

      March 20, 2011 at 5:52 am | Report abuse |
    • espanOLÉ

      Maybe you should go Sheen on us and "blink and cure your brain." The murder, the lies, the propaganda, the saying-the-US-and-coalition-forces-have-it-coming-to-them-ing, it's all be done before esse. Grow up and be a leader, the world is tired of this little kid with a crack pipe and a gat bullsh–t.

      March 20, 2011 at 7:18 am | Report abuse |
  14. Future

    Definately rouge states bmd countries wt a tainted furher' concentration camp history r behind Ghadaffi and supply him.big up 2 the UN security council and from there, Mugabe shud b next online!

    March 20, 2011 at 2:48 am | Report abuse |
  15. Cymru

    where is the outrage from the left wing?? Obama doing the same thing Bush did. Saddam Husien was far worse than Gadaffi. how long will it be when confirmed reports of civillian deaths start to surface? the argument was Iraq never attacked us, well either did Libya. total double standard.

    March 20, 2011 at 2:49 am | Report abuse |
    • Michael

      No Cymru, the argument from Bush/Cheney was that Iraq had weapons of mass destruction. Bush/Cheney lied. They lied. Get that through your thick head. It cost the United States nearly five thousand dead and more than 25 thousand injured/wounded/maimed. It also cost the United States more than a trillion dollars and that bill isn't final, yet. If you're going to make an argument, make an argument that has real facts to back it up. Now Cymru, run back to your radio. I'm sure there is a rerun of Rush, Beck or Hannity you can listen to and memorize their lies some more. Move along.

      March 20, 2011 at 4:55 am | Report abuse |
    • Meldinoor

      Another very important difference between what we're doing in Libya and what Bush did in Iraq, is that we invaded Iraq. We fought a long war on the ground in Iraq, whereas in Libya we're just assisting the people by taking out Gaddafi's infrastructure. You can't really compare Iraq to Libya

      March 20, 2011 at 7:26 am | Report abuse |
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