Libya live blog: Coalition confirms strike on Gadhafi compound
A four-story building at the Tripoli compound of Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi was damaged Sunday night, apparently by a coalition airstrike.
March 20th, 2011
10:53 AM ET

Libya live blog: Coalition confirms strike on Gadhafi compound

The latest developments on the situation in Libya, where coalition forces launched a series of coordinated airstrikes on Saturday after they were convinced Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi was not adhering to a cease-fire mandated by the United Nations. Read our complete story and check out our full coverage on unrest in the Arab world. Also, don't miss a gripping, high-resolution gallery of images from Libya.

[10:51 p.m. Sunday ET, 4:51 a.m. Monday in Libya] An announced list of the countries participating in the military coalition: The United States, Belgium, Britain, Canada, Denmark, France, Italy, Norway, Qatar and Spain.

U.S. officials have said they plan to hand over operational control of the military mission in coming days.

[8:55 p.m. Sunday ET, 2:55 a.m. Monday in Libya] In the following video, CNN's Nic Robertson reports on his visit to the building - in Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi's compound in Tripoli - that apparently was struck in a coalition airstrike Sunday night. (A coalition official confirmed, after Robertson's report, that it had targeted the compound.)

[8:36 p.m. Sunday ET, 2:36 a.m. Monday in Libya] A coalition military official has confirmed that Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi's compound in Tripoli was targeted by airstrikes Sunday night, CNN's Chris Lawrence reported.

The official said the compound was targeted because it contains capabilities to exercise command and control over Libyan forces and the coalition goal is to degrade his military capabilities. The official said neither Gadhafi nor his residence was the intended target.

Earlier, the Libyan government said at least one missile struck a building inside the compound Sunday night. Western journalists, including CNN's Nic Robertson, were brought inside the compound to survey the destruction.

[8:26 p.m. Sunday ET, 2:26 a.m. Monday in Libya] Oil prices jumped more than $2 a barrel in electronic trading Sunday following escalating violence in Libya, where international forces fired on Libyan defense sites, CNNMoney reported.

The benchmark U.S. contract, West Texas Intermediate, for April delivery gained $1.95 to $103.02 a barrel. The more active May contract jumped $2.08 to $103.93 a barrel.

[8:10 p.m. Sunday ET, 2:10 a.m. Monday in Libya] The Gadhafi-compound building in Tripoli that was damaged in what may have been a missile attack Sunday night is about 150 yards away from a Gadhafi building that was struck in a 1986 U.S. airstrike, CNN's Nic Robertson reported.

[7:56 p.m. Sunday ET, 1:56 a.m. Monday in Libya] A member of the Libyan opposition told CNN that the Gadhafi government collected bodies of people killed in fighting in the past week and displayed them over the weekend, trying to show they were killed by coalition airstrikes. The claim by Ahmed Gebreel, who cited eyewitnesses and medical officials, could not be verified by CNN.

The Libyan government has claimed that women, children and clerics have died in allied attacks.

[7:15 p.m. Sunday ET, 1:15 a.m. Monday in Libya] A building at Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi's compound in Tripoli was damaged by at least one missile about 2.5 hours ago, a Libyan government official tells CNN's Nic Robertson.

Robertson said government officials took him to the four-story building. The roof has collapsed, he said. Robertson said he isn't able to verify what caused the damage, but the government's timeline coincides with a blast that Robertson heard late Sunday, and the building looks as if it were hit by missiles, Robertson reported.

Robertson said he doesn't know where Gadhafi is, and that there is no evidence that he is at the compound. No one was injured in the strike on the building, a Libyan government official told Robertson.

U.S. officials earlier Sunday said they are not targeting Gadhafi.

[6:36 p.m. Sunday ET, 12:36 a.m. Monday in Libya] President Obama and his national security team made phone calls Sunday to try to shore up support in Arab governments for the military mission in Libya, with top White House aides reaching out to officials of the Arab League to insist the bombing does not exceed the scope of a U.N. mandate, according to senior administration officials.

The lobbying came after Arab League officials complained earlier Sunday that airstrikes in Libya by the U.S. military and allies went beyond instituting a no-fly zone, CNN's Ed Henry reports. The senior officials said the Obama team stressed to the Arab League that bombing Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi's air defenses falls within the U.N. Security Council resolution's scope of imposing a no-fly zone and taking "all necessary measures" to stop the dictator from attacking civilians in his own country.

[5:57 p.m. Sunday ET, 11:57 p.m. in Libya] Defense Secretary Robert Gates said Sunday that the Libyan operation is off to a "a strong and successful start" but he warned against widening the goals of the mission beyond what was spelled out in the United Nations Security Council resolution. Gates spoke from aboard a U.S. military aircraft en route to Russia.

[5:40 p.m. Sunday ET, 11:40 p.m. in Libya] Reacting to the Libyan military's calling a cease-fire with rebels, a British prime minister's office spokesman drew attention to the Libyan government's previous call for a cease-fire, made Friday.

"Everyone will recall that in recent days Col. Gadhafi declared a ceasefire which was promptly violated," the 10 Downing Street spokesman said. "We said then we would judge him on his actions not his words - and we will do so again.

"His obligations are very clearly set out by the U.N. Security Council resolution. Our assessment is that he is in breach of these obligations so we will continue to enforce the resolution."

The Libyan government had called for a cease-fire with rebels on Friday. Rebels and Western governments, however, said the Libyan military continued to fight against the opposition, leading to the international coalition's airstrikes and no-fly-zone implementation on Saturday night.

[5:35 p.m. Sunday ET, 11:35 p.m. in Libya] More on U.S. Vice Adm. Bill Gortney comments on Gadhafi: Gortney was asked about reports of smoking rise from the area of Gadhafi's palace. Gortney said: "We are not targeting his residence."

[5:16 p.m. Sunday ET, 11:16 p.m. in Libya] In his press briefing earlier this afternoon, U.S. Vice Adm. Bill Gortney emphasized that the international coalition's air campaign is not deisgned to target Gadhafi, but is limited to enforcing a no-fly zone and preventing Gadhafi's forces from further pressing rebel positions.

"We are not going after Gadhafi," Gortney said at the Pentagon. "Regime forces are more pressed and less free to maneuver."

Despite Libyan government contentions that women, children and clerics have died in allied attacks, Gortney and other officials said that's not the case. "We have no indication of any civilian casualties," the admiral said.

[4:47 p.m. Sunday ET, 10:47 p.m. in Libya] Reacting to the Libyan military's call Sunday night for an immediate cease-fire, a spokesman for the U.S. military's Africa Command said that "we have to wait and see if it's genuine."

"We urge the Libyan government to do everything it can to demonstrate its sincerity," U.S. Africa Command spokesman Vince Crawley told CNN.

The Libyan government previously had called for a cease-fire with rebels on Friday. Rebels and Western governments, however, said the Libyan military continued to fight against the opposition, leading to the international coalition's airstrikes and no-fly-zone implementation on Saturday night.

Gadhafi's forces shelled opposition forces in the west of the country on Sunday before the call for the cease-fire was made, according to rebels.

[4:42 p.m. Sunday ET, 10:42 p.m. in Libya] Anti-Gadhafi forces are heartened by international coalition attacks that smashed a convoy of about 70 military vehicles belonging to pro-Gadhafi forces outside of Benghazi on Sunday. But they are increasingly concerned that pro-government elements within Benghazi's population will carry out intimidation campaigns and targeted assassinations of opposition leaders in the rebel stronghold in eastern Libya, CNN's Arwa Damon reports.

[4:34 p.m. Sunday ET, 10:34 p.m. in Libya] Senator Richard Lugar, R-Indiana, has questioned the decision by the United States to pursue military action in Libya without clearly defined objectives, and expressed concern over the role of the U.S. in Libya's future.

"Where does our involvement stop?" Lugar, the ranking Republican on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, asked. "This is why, before it begins, we ought to have a plan and we ought to have outcomes defined as to why American forces, American money are going to be at stake."

[4:23 p.m. Sunday ET, 10:23 p.m. in Libya] U.S. House Speaker John Boehner has released a sharply worded statement in Washington pressing President Barack Obama to lay out more detail about the administration's goals in Libya.

"Before any further military commitments are made, the administration must do a better job of communicating to the American people and to Congress about our mission in Libya and how it will be achieved," Boehner said in the prepared statement.

Shortly after Boehner's statement was released, Obama - who is in Brazil - said in a speech that the people of Libya have taken "a courageous stand against a regime determined to brutalize its own citizens."

"Across the region, we have seen young people rise up – a new generation demanding the right to determine their own future," added Obama. "From the beginning, we have made clear that the change they seek must be driven by their own people."

[4:08 p.m. Sunday ET, 10:08 p.m. in Libya] At least two explosions could be heard moments ago in Libya's capital, and anti-aircraft fire has followed, CNN's Nic Robertson reported.

[4:06 p.m. Sunday ET, 10:06 p.m. in Libya] Coalition strikes have been "very effective in significantly degrading the regime's air defense capability," U.S Vice Adm. William Gortney said in a briefing Sunday.

[3:37 p.m. Sunday ET, 9:37 p.m. in Libya] The United States and Britain have now fired a total of 124 Tomahawk missiles at Libya's air defense sites since strikes began Saturday night, Africa Command spokesman Vince Crawley says.

[3:04 p.m. Sunday ET, 9:04 p.m. in Libya] The Libyan military has called for an immediate cease-fire, an army spokesman announced Sunday.

The Libyan government previously had called for a cease-fire with rebels on Friday. Rebels and Western governments, however, said the Libyan military continued to fight against the opposition, leading to the international coalition's airstrikes and no-fly-zone implementation on Saturday night.

[2:27 p.m. Sunday ET, 8:27 p.m. in Libya] Libya initiated anti-aircraft fire into the Tripoli sky Sunday night, though an attack by allied forces was not apparent, CNN's Nic Robertson reported.

[2:04 p.m. Sunday ET, 8:05 p.m. in Libya] A senior doctor at the medical center in Benghazi, Libya, confirmed Sunday that 95 people were killed and an unknown number injured in Saturday's assault on the city by pro-Gadhafi forces.

[1:53 p.m. Sunday ET, 7:53 p.m. in Libya] U.S. President Barack Obama participated in a secure conference call and received a briefing on U.S. military operations in Libya on Sunday morning, the White House said in a statement.

[1:34 p.m. Sunday ET, 7:24 p.m. in Libya] The Arab League was holding an emergency session at its headquarters in Cairo, Egypt. Hisham Youssef, Arab League Chief of Staff, told CNN, "We are currently studying the situation and evaluating the air strikes to be able to decide." He said the League has not "taken any stand or reached a final decision." Read more about the Arab League and its role in the Libyan crisis. Watch CNN's Reza Sayah discuss the Arab League.

[1:15 p.m. Sunday ET,  7 p.m. in Libya] Qatar has offered to send four fighter planes to the coalition effort, the French Defense Ministry said.

[11:45 a.m. Sunday ET, 5:45 p.m. in Libya] Italy announced that as of midnight Sunday, four Tornado warplanes and four F-16s will be made available.

[11:00 a.m. Sunday ET, 5 p.m. in Libya] A critique of the U.S. involvement in the military intervention in Libya that will no doubt be common in coming days is that the Obama administration is making a large error by embarking on a war with a third Muslim country, as if reversing Moammar Gadhafi's momentum against the rebels will be a rerun of the debacle of the war against Saddam Hussein. Peter Bergen explains why what's happening Libya isn't the same as what happened in Iraq.

[10:45 a.m. Sunday ET, 4:45 p.m. in Libya] Russia urged coalition nations to stop the use of force against Libya, challenging the use of the U.N. no-fly zone resolution as a "controversial step." In a statement published on its website, Russia's Foreign Ministry said air strikes carried out by coalition forces killed 48 civilians and injured 150.

[10 a.m. Sunday ET, 4 p.m. in Libya] Turkey will serve as a "protecting power" for the United States in Libya, senior State Department officials told CNN. As a protecting power, Turkey will represent the United States in Libya, including acting as consular officers on behalf of U.S. citizens in Libya and looking after American diplomatic facilities in the country. Turkey can also pass messages between the U.S. and Libya. Full story

[8:23 a.m. Sunday ET, 2:23 p.m. in Libya] A military convoy near Benghazi in eastern Libya was destroyed by multiple airstrikes, leaving charred bodies, tanks and trucks, CNN's Arwa Damon reported from the scene.

- A no-fly zone in Libya is "effectively in place," U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Adm. Mike Mullen told CNN.

[6:53 a.m. Sunday ET, 12:53 p.m. in Libya] Forces loyal to Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi were shelling the city of Misrata on Sunday, using tanks, artillery and cannons, a witness said. Rebels in the city were fighting back, the witness said. There was no immediate word on casualties.

[6:36 a.m. Sunday ET, 12:36 p.m. in Libya] Nineteen U.S. warplanes, including stealth bombers and fighter jets, conducted strike operations in Libya on Sunday morning. The warplanes included Marine Corps Harrier Jets, Air Force B-2 stealth bombers, and F-15 and F-16 fighter jets, according to Lt. Cmdr. James Stockman of U.S. Africa Command. It is the next phase in the operation that started Saturday with the launch of more than 110 Tomahawk Cruise missiles from U.S. and British warships and subs.

[5:40 a.m. Sunday ET, 11:40 a.m. in Libya] In another defiant speech, Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi promised "a long-drawn war" after international airstrikes in his country by the United States and allies.

"You have proven to the world that you are not civilized, that you are terrorists - animals attacking a safe nation that did nothing against you," Gadhafi said in a televised speech.

Throughout the address, an image of a golden fist crushing a model plane that said "USA" filled the screen.

Gadhafi said the strikes was a confrontation between the Libyan people and "the new Nazis."

"If the men are killed, then the women will take over. They will hold the green flag high," he said.

[5:35 a.m. Sunday ET, 11:35 a.m. in Libya] An eyewitnesses in Misrata claims there is heavy artillery and tank fire under way in the town. The eyewitness also claims no aircraft have been seen or heard.

[5:26 a.m. Sunday ET, 11:26 a.m. in Libya] Libyan TV has announced that Moammar Gadhafi "will address the Libyan people shortly to address the nation concerning the assault of the crusaders against the people of Libya."

[1:10 a.m. Sunday ET, 7:10 a.m. in Libya] Fighter jets were seen flying over the Libyan city of Benghazi on Sunday morning. It was not immediately clear who the fighter jets belonged to.

China's foreign ministry expressed regret over the military strike on Libya and said it does not agree with use of force in international relations.

The Spanish armed forces will send four F-18 planes, a refueling plane, an F-100 frigate, a submarine and a maritime surveillance aircraft to Libya.

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez denounced the military intervention in Libya, and slammed the United States and the United Nations. "They (the U.S.) want to appropriate the oil in Libya; they don't care about anyone's life in that region," he said, according to Venezuelan state media. "When have they cared about the lives in those places if they keep on bombing Iran and Afghanistan?"

A defiant Gadhafi said Libya will fight back against undeserved "naked aggression." His military claimed nearly 50 people, including, women, children and clerics, were killed in Saturday evening's attacks.

American, French and British military forces, convinced that Gadhafi was not adhering to a United Nations-mandated cease-fire, hammered Libyan military positions with missiles and fighter jets in the first phase of an operation that will include enforcement of a no-fly zone.

French fighter jets deployed over Libya fired at a military vehicle Saturday, the first strike against Gadhafi's military forces, which earlier attacked the rebel stronghold of Benghazi.

Gadhafi, speaking early Sunday on Libyan state TV, said the U.N. charter provides for Libya's right to defend itself in a "war zone." Weapons depots will be opened, he said.

U.S. President Barack Obama authorized U.S. military force from Brazil on what happened to be the eighth anniversary of the start of the war in Iraq.

In the next few days, U.S. military officials expect to hand over control to a coalition commander. Canada and Italy also are part of the coalition.


soundoff (685 Responses)
  1. Hadit

    That Chavez character in Venezuela needs to be next in the missile sights, getting kind of sick of his comments, and he has more oil than Libya.

    March 20, 2011 at 2:52 am | Report abuse |
    • Claire

      His comment about the United States "bombing Iran and Afghanistan..." was that a typo on CNN's part or did he really say Iran?

      March 20, 2011 at 3:07 am | Report abuse |
    • Jim

      Chavez was elected (and more than once). He can say what he wants. The US has done enough bullying in that part of the world that regular folks find his standing up to the US to be in their national interst...Sorry to throw water on on this warmongering.

      March 20, 2011 at 4:08 am | Report abuse |
    • Chris

      YEAH MR. HADIT. WHAT THE HELL ARE YOU SAYING? BOMB AND KILL AN ELECTED LEADER COS YOU'RE SICK OF HIS COMMENTS? I REALLY THINK THAT THE WHOLE POINT OF WHAT THE FOUNDING FATHERS WERE ACTUALLY MEANING WENT WAAAY OVER YOUR HEAD.

      March 20, 2011 at 6:09 am | Report abuse |
  2. Scott

    Well.... Any hope O had at 2012 is gone. He just lost the undecided and parts of the hard left Nixon's (silent majority if you will). Might as well pull a LBJ and let the DNC pick somebody that has a chance against Rand Paul or whoever the GOP surprise us with....sigh

    March 20, 2011 at 2:53 am | Report abuse |
  3. Abdullah Abdulla

    Did they change back the hour yet.

    March 20, 2011 at 2:53 am | Report abuse |
  4. otibap

    Ghadaffi is hiding his ass with the innocent people making them human sheild...UN armed forces should see to it that no civilians could become a collateral damage..Are those so called loyalist blind with the truth or just bunch of idiots who dont think for their own good.Hope for less casualties and end of this bloody war...UN has the right to take actions to whatever means so as to protect the civilians from this mad dog dictator..

    March 20, 2011 at 2:53 am | Report abuse |
    • Chris

      UUUUGH NO HUMAN SHIELDS YET PAL. NO I THINK YOU'RE THINKING OF GAZA. KINDA GENERALIZING A BIT THERE BUDDY. LOOKS BAD.

      March 20, 2011 at 6:11 am | Report abuse |
  5. Craig

    I usually try not to read the comments section because of all the usual dumb opinions but when I see comments like those made by Martha I have to say something. Those people are "rioting" because they have been brutally repressed for decades & want a new government like the people in Tunisia and Egypt one where human rights are respected and where they may have a chance at being prosperous. These people are not hooligans looking to steal TVs or to randomly cause chaos but are a people fighting for liberty and to side with Libya's brutal dictator is both unintelligent and disgusting.

    March 20, 2011 at 2:57 am | Report abuse |
    • Martha

      Sensationalizing a Riot still makes it a Riot. The guy is 68 years old and has been in power for 41 years. They seemed to get along just fine and went through how many of the past government administrations? Those are just facts. What we went want is everyone to be just like us. We've taken protests and made them what we want them to be. There are always those who will think the opposite. Take Obama for instance, most people want him out, however, we don't see the 60 percent of the people rioting to do so. If they want change, it won't begin at the end of the barrel of a gun I can guarantee you that and even if they did find some sort of absolution, it wasn't our civil war to be involved in. Where do you draw the line? Are we now going to step foot into every Muslim country that has a few people that want to be westernized too? That's just not thinking things through.

      March 20, 2011 at 3:12 am | Report abuse |
    • heidi

      martha, you're a wee bit naive. the last time i checked americans won their independence at the end of a lot of guns. and have maintained it at the end of a gun against other brutal dictators and aggressors such as hitler ... freedom is NOT free. people tend to die, sadly, in the fight for and maintenace of freedom.

      March 20, 2011 at 3:32 am | Report abuse |
    • heidi

      oh, and by the way, thank goodness france was around when we broke from england. cause i suppose it wasn't their fight either... but without their assistance we wouldn't be the united states.

      March 20, 2011 at 3:33 am | Report abuse |
    • William

      Martha, Have you forgotten the Lockabie Bombing of the Pan Am plane over Scotland. This was done by Gadaffi agents on his orders. You still want to defend him?

      March 20, 2011 at 5:13 am | Report abuse |
    • jschneier62

      Martha, because you do not like Obama do not speak for "most people." 60%, really? And just where do you get your "facts' (I use that term loosely) from? Regardless of how much you hate him he's doing the best he can despite all the opposition from the Republican Party.

      March 20, 2011 at 5:30 am | Report abuse |
    • john

      READ THE BIBLE

      March 20, 2011 at 6:01 am | Report abuse |
    • Chris

      I JUST CANT WAIT TIL JOHN ABOVE GETS HIS HANDS ON AN L RON HUBBARD BOOK

      March 20, 2011 at 6:29 am | Report abuse |
    • Martha Is Dumb

      @Martha Wow...you are really dumb.. (Smack face, Shake head)

      March 20, 2011 at 7:09 am | Report abuse |
    • THILLSMAX

      CRAIG
      GOOD FOR YOU. BUT YOU HAVE TO KEEP IN MIND THAT MOST OF THE PUBLIC ARE IGNORANT AND GEOPOLITICALLY UNINTELLIGENT WITH MISPLACED IDEALISM AND DEPENDENT ON MISGUIDED FAITH THAT GOD WILL MAKE EVERYTHING RIGHT.

      March 20, 2011 at 8:05 am | Report abuse |
    • Robert

      Craig, I may not agree with all of Martha's points but her statements are not "dumb". Name calling doesn't win the discussion. True the people are "rioting" because they have been brutally repressed.. and yes Libya's brutal dictator is both unintelligent and disgusting BUT it is an internal matter to their country.

      Martha
      I will disagree that they "seemed to get along just fine." the people are suffering and they have a right to protest. You are correct that we want is everyone to be just like us. Problem is they don't necessarily want to be just like us.

      Ref your comment – It isn't our civil war to be involved in. Where do you draw the line? Are we now going to step foot into every Muslim country that has a few people that want to be westernized too? AMEN!! Thank you for seeing the truth. That is my whole point; it is an internal matter that we shouldn't be involved in.

      March 20, 2011 at 9:26 am | Report abuse |
  6. Cesar

    @Scott: Do you like sweets? Marsh Mellow pie in your face.

    March 20, 2011 at 2:59 am | Report abuse |
  7. Bubba Nicholson

    Here is the left wing. Amazing thing these iphones, huh? Nothing like real-time eyewitness video to sway most liberals that yes, something needs to be done to help the forces of democracy.
    If only we'd had those iphones at Sumpter, to show that nobody'd been hurt. We could have avoided the civil war.

    March 20, 2011 at 3:00 am | Report abuse |
    • Michael

      Bubba the typical southern, white right-wing nut.

      March 20, 2011 at 5:01 am | Report abuse |
  8. JeffLA

    Slaughter of civilians ? Oh please ! This is a smokescreen used to justify taking sides in a civil war. Its a play out of the Bush admins playbook. They just did it smarter by foolinh the media into reporting they have a real coalition which they don't. This is a US,French, British operation.The rebels simply held up where the civilians are for protection, unfortunately for them Gadhafi doesn't care who they hide behind. I'd respect Obama more if he was just honest about what he's doing, trying to topple Gadhafi once and for all. Then it could have done it earlier instead of having to wait untill the Rebels were about to be wiped out by Gadhafi forces.

    March 20, 2011 at 3:01 am | Report abuse |
    • Chris

      JEFFLA ...... YOU ARE VERY REFRESHING.
      COME ON PEOPLLLLLLE ..... HE'S SETTING A STANDARD HERE. WAKEN UUUUP!

      March 20, 2011 at 6:15 am | Report abuse |
    • espanOLÉ

      JEFFLA, you're failing to realize that if Obama's play here is as shallow as simply toppling the Daffy regime, the administration cannot come out and say that because the bureaucratic nutjobs that comprise the UN would never let that happen. There are a lot of hoops you have to jump through before you can pull the trigger in situations like this. All of that put aside, the bottom line is simple. There is a civil war going on in Libya, a war where the federal gov't is attacking civilian noncombatants. I understand that collateral damage is part of war, but if your opponent starts hiding behind civilians you stop the offensive until you can find means to strike your targets without taking unreasonable civilian casualties. The fact of the matter is the UN placed sactions on the Libyan Gov't and instead of just ignoring them, they lied about the actions they were taking. For those reasons, they brought this on themselves.
      As far as the US being a part of this opperation, we have a responsibility to support our NATO allies (particularly the UK, France, and Italy) who, even without US involvment, would be carrying out this opperation themselves.
      Our elected officials are just that, elected. We've put the responsibility on thier shoulders to make the right decisions. I'm going to leave it to the experts on this one, international relations is a pretty complex world, that's why I vote people into office to take on that burden for me. If you're unhappy with the decisions they're making, we vote new ones in every November.

      March 20, 2011 at 7:37 am | Report abuse |
  9. Cesar

    @Bubba, the right-winger: Marsh Mellow Pie in your face.

    March 20, 2011 at 3:03 am | Report abuse |
  10. b

    This makes me sick when will america realize its not our business there right the only thing we care about is oil I will gladly start walking instead of having women and children be killed just kill Ghadaffi.

    March 20, 2011 at 3:04 am | Report abuse |
    • heidi

      you should do your research before speaking. we get over 75 percent of our oil now from canada, venezuela, and saudi arabia, i think was the third major country. we don't get any from libya. this isn't about OIL people. its about being AMERICANS and helping those in need. now if we get a little oil in the fallout, well, that can't be so bad... 🙂

      March 20, 2011 at 3:36 am | Report abuse |
    • lil

      I agree about starting to like Hilary. I thought she was really well spoken over the past few days.

      March 20, 2011 at 3:42 am | Report abuse |
    • MC

      Uh Heidi, it's about the OIL. Any intervention in an oil producing nation reflects on the price of oil worldwide. It doesn't matter where it comes from. This is about oil not democracy or being AMERICAN as you stated. Get your head out of your ass.

      March 20, 2011 at 8:24 am | Report abuse |
  11. dallas covington

    Well yes we did not have to get into this war, but when people are pleading for help cuz the quazie quack-daffy is killing all his people, we and the international communities should not stand by and do nothing. It's like if you were at a bus stop and one person picked on another person, would you just stand by and watch ? or would you help the unfortunate person and get the bully of his back?

    as for weapons supplied, i'd look at black market weapons sold from the russkies and the chinezes. plenty of stuff can be gotten from the black mkts.

    March 20, 2011 at 3:07 am | Report abuse |
  12. dallas covington

    i figured as much that the russkies and the chin-ezeies and the koreans would abstain. their game is to watch and learn how the proactive forces are handling this-wolves out in the field.

    March 20, 2011 at 3:09 am | Report abuse |
  13. Julie

    A poster stated when people riot they need to be controlled? Are you kidding me? They were protesting this crazy dictator of a man and he is killing them. Do you think that is ok? I hope that guy is taken out and the Libyan people get their freedom. They deserve it and America should always be for those who want to be free. Of course China doesn't agree. What else would you expect

    March 20, 2011 at 3:10 am | Report abuse |
    • Martha

      Let's just say I agree with you. Ghadafhi is a lunatic. You know, the media is reporting that ALL the middle eastern countries, are rioting if you haven't noticed. Yemen, Egypt, Libya, Iran, Syria, Tunisia, Buhrain, etc etc. etc. Why do I call it "rioting"? ..because ALL of the countries in the middle east cannot possibly ALL have lunatic leaders, yet the media is trying to portray the exact same thing everywhere. That changes it from ONE "freedom" seeking people in a country to a "mob mentality". If it were that extreme, "decades" ago, we would have been there already. That's just my opinion.

      March 20, 2011 at 3:46 am | Report abuse |
    • Chris

      RIGHT – EVEN WHEN THEY RIOT AND RAID TANKS, GUNS AND PLANES FROM THE ARMORIES AND ATTACK THE MARINES AND THE US ARMED FORCES THEN? HUH. THAT'S A PRETTY EXTREME VIEWPOINT. COS THAT'S WHAT HAPPENNED IN LIBYA. WELL OK – WHEN THAT HAPPENS IN THE US AND THEY HAPPEN TO BE A SECTION OF THE POPULATION THAT YOU OPPOSE, ILL SEE WHAT YOU HAVE TO SAY THEN ABOUT FREEDOM IN THE CHAT ROOM........

      March 20, 2011 at 5:38 am | Report abuse |
    • Chris

      BY THE WAY MARTHA – YUP – IM AFRAID THAT EVEN THO THE COUNTRIES ARE VASTLY DIFFERENT, HISTORY HAS GIVEN THE WORLD REASONS TO IMPOSE A GENERAL SUPPORT OF ALL THOSE COUNTRIES HAVING FULL-ON DICTATORSHIPS. THE MAIN REASON IS OIL.

      March 20, 2011 at 6:19 am | Report abuse |
    • jschneier62

      Martha, Martha, Martha.....you really need to get out more often. You should read from sources other than the back of a cereal box. Gaddafi was crazy from day one. Back in '69 he staged a coup d'etat against King Idris, launching the Libyan Revolution. He set up extensive surveillance systems throughout the country watching everyone in the government, factories, and the schools. He publicly executed dissidents and broadcasted it on state run television. He had diplomats and assassins hired to kill refugees around the world. Amnesty International listed at least 25 dead between '80 and '87. In '77, he ordered an artillery strike against Egypt in retaliation for Anwar Sadat's intention to sign a peace treaty with Israel. He has started conflicts with Chad because he thought his rebel forces were losing his stronghold there. He stepped up for Idi Amin (another crazed, bloodthirsty dictator) and went into Tanzania. Much of the country's wealth from oil, in the 70s, was spent on arms. The population was becoming impoverished because he was too concerned with funding terrorist groups and paramilitaries. An airstrike failed to kill him in '86. Libya was finally put under international sanctions for the bombing of the flight that went down at Lockerbie, Scotland.
      This man has nine lives like a cat. Despite the movies that come out of Hollywood, you just don't send a "Mission Impossible" team in and poof the problems been exterminated. You have several crazies out there that took a while to get overthrown. (Dates in parentheses are the years spent in office) Saddam (1979-03), Milosevic (1989-97 of Serbia; then 1997-00 of Yugoslavia), Idi Amin (1971-79), Hitler (1933-45), Kim Jong IL (1994-Present), Mussolini (1922-43), Stalin (1924-53), etc., etc. If you noticed they're not ALL from the Middle East. But here lately that seems to be where people, that have been oppressed for too long, have decided they've had enough and are doing something about it.
      Read a little more on the dynamics of international relations from reputable sources, and a little less of whatever cereal box you're reading. And stop believing everything that comes out of Hollywood......remember, it's ONLY a movie!! 🙂

      March 20, 2011 at 6:40 am | Report abuse |
    • Robert

      jschneier62

      You present an eloquent case for declaring Gaddafi insane, I doubt anybody would argue with that but please present a more educated response to MArtha besides the cereal box mud slinging.

      Yes Gaddafi was a problem back in 69.

      Yes he was a key part in the Lockerby bombing. BUt do we have the right to intervene in a civil war internal matter? No! By the way, the reason you don't see a MI force assassinate him is it is against US law to specifically target a political leader for assassination. That's what prevented us from taking Saddam out. That's part of what makes us above the rest.
      As far as your recommendation for Martha to read a little more on the dynamics of ... and less cereal boxes, may I suggest you read some more on international law and quit listening to the inflammatory rhetoric you listen to. Anarchy is rule by the mob – don't be a part of it.

      Again, we have no legal basis to be involved yet. This is an internal matter. If somebody did this to us we would be outraged.

      March 20, 2011 at 3:36 pm | Report abuse |
  14. Phil Bern

    Yawn. So when is this going to be over? Would the next obvious dictator pah-lease stand up? Hugo, it's your turn next.

    March 20, 2011 at 3:10 am | Report abuse |
    • Chris

      HOPEFULLY IT WILL BE OVER WHEN THEY RIOT AND TAKE OUT THE DICTATORS OF OUR OIL-PRODUCING ALLIES SAUDI ARABIA WHO ARE THE HIGHEST FORM OF DICTATORSHIP – AND NOT ELECTED – WHO RULE WITH AN IRON FIST............. EXCEPT ....... AMERICA LIKES IT SO I GUESS IT CAN STILL OPERATE WITH IMPUNITY. HMMMMM. THAT'S WEIRD. HYPOCRITICAL EVEN.
      THE REAL FIGHT IS IN YEMEN, SAUDI AND BAHRAIN. GO ON AMERICA – IMPOSE A NO-FLY ZONE

      March 20, 2011 at 5:40 am | Report abuse |
  15. CIAISI

    why is the US, UK and Palestine attacking Libya is it the oil and all the co's which have invested there. How come they were not able to do anything In serbia and croation, rawanda or most importantly Palestine of Kashmir. Tis is pathetic and sad!!!!! let the people deal with it......................

    March 20, 2011 at 3:11 am | Report abuse |
    • lil

      Hey CIAISI and Martha, did either of you hear that he U.S. does NOT get oil from Libya. Why don't you two fly over to Libya right now and just hang out then you will see the fear the citizens have of their leader. He has no trouble visciously killing them. The media always mentions the U,S. as we are a large, powerful country and Gadafi wants the world to think that we are the big, bad wolf. I guess saving millions of peoples lives is a really bad thing to do! Did you ever read about Hitler or can you read. Did you also miss reading/hearing that the other Arab countries and the Libyian people were begging the U.N. to come in before they were slaughtered. Visualize a cow being slaughtered. It that okay with you! Oh by the way, if you live in the U.S. and don't like it I am sure there is room in Libya, Iran, Venezula or Russia.

      March 20, 2011 at 3:40 am | Report abuse |
    • Chris

      IM TRYING TO TAKE III SERIOUSLY BUT I JUST CANT. AHEM. GOD BLESS YOU COTTON SOX III BUT IF YOU PUT SADDAM HUSSEIN AND QUADDAFFI ON A 'BAD DICTATOR' SCALE, THEY WOULD BOTH BE AT ABOUT 4 OUT OF 10. THERE ARE A LONG LIST OF 8,9,AND 10S OUT THERE. THEY KILL LOADSA INNOCENTS. TORTURE EM TOO – MORE THAN IN ELIZABETHAN DAYS, STATISTICS SHOW. PLEASE STOP THINKING YOUR COUNTRY IS AGAINST THEM – IT SUPPORTS MOST OF THEM AND FLIES IN LOTS OF 'JASON BOURNE' TYPES TO SUBTERFUGE THEIR FREEDOM MOVEMENTS. IT'S JUST A DOOZIE.

      March 20, 2011 at 6:23 am | Report abuse |
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