Wednesday's intriguing people
Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz of Florida will become the chairwoman of the Democratic National Committee.
April 6th, 2011
10:55 AM ET

Wednesday's intriguing people

Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz

The Florida congresswoman will be named chairwoman of the Democratic National Committee, replacing Tim Kaine, who is running for the Senate from Virginia. Two women have previously been the chairs of the DNC: Jean Westwood in 1972 and Debra DeLee in 1994 and 1995. Debbie Wasserman Schultz has risen in the ranks of the Democratic Party since she took office in 2005. The congresswoman is a breast cancer survivor and the mother of three children. Many Americans may recognize her as one of the friends present at the hospital when Rep. Gabrielle Giffords first opened her eyes after being shot in January.

Rep. Curt Weldon

The former Pennsylvania congressman has arrived in Libya to meet with Moammar Gadhafi. Weldon wrote in a New York Times op-ed piece, "I've met him enough times to know that it will be very hard to simply bomb him into submission." Weldon wrote that he's going on the invitation of Gadhafi's chief of staff and called for an immediate U.N.-monitored cease-fire, "with the Libyan army withdrawing from contested cities and rebel forces ending attempts to advance."

Roxy Kurze

The Warren, Michigan, native found a kidney donor for her husband on Facebook. Though an infrequent user of the popular social networking site, Kurze wrote a post lamenting her husband's deteriorating condition, according to the Detroit News. She wrote, "I wish a kidney would fall out the sky," and "If someone knows a living type O donor, let me know." Not long after, Ricky Cisco replied, offering up his kidney.

Cliff Forrest

The 10-year-old from Pittsburgh gave the Super Bowl ring he bought with his college savings for $8,500 back to retired Chicago Bears player William "The Refrigerator" Perry. Perry had to sell the ring several years ago after being diagnosed with an autoimmune disease and falling on hard times. Forrest wanted to buy the ring and give it back to Perry, and the avid sports memorabilia collector told ESPN on Monday, "When I Googled Mr. Perry after I got the ring, I saw he had the disease and went through rough times. And I thought he needed it more than I did."

soundoff (9 Responses)
  1. Joey

    How fascinating to learn the intricacies of relationships between those who post here.
    Intrigues and manipulation are legion.
    It reminds me of THE FIGURE IN THE CARPET by Henry James.

    April 6, 2011 at 11:16 am | Report abuse | Reply
  2. booogs

    Reminds me i forgot to wipe again

    April 6, 2011 at 1:43 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  3. banasy

    I'll admit it. I'm intrigued.

    April 6, 2011 at 2:36 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  4. Joey

    Hi, banasy. Still at work till about 8:00 PM.
    Just caught lunch.

    April 6, 2011 at 4:09 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  5. Joey

    No comment on ten-year-old Cliff Forrest's returning a Super Bowl ring to the player who earned it?
    Sometimes ten-year-old guys are much wiser than adults.
    Cliff Forrest's life will always be much better because he did that.

    April 6, 2011 at 4:51 pm | Report abuse | Reply
    • leeintulsa

      I hope someone else gives him the money back.. Don't know that trading college for putting a spring in Perry's step was *that* wise...

      April 6, 2011 at 9:48 pm | Report abuse |
  6. banasy

    Hi, Joey. And I agree. You put it more eloquently than I ever could!

    April 6, 2011 at 5:45 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  7. Joey

    Thank you, banasy!
    That means about ten tons coming from somebody who could could write that rods/basement/husband twist to my post.

    April 6, 2011 at 5:51 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  8. Joey

    Still at work: on a (legal) coffee-and break.

    April 6, 2011 at 5:53 pm | Report abuse | Reply

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