Panetta says he thinks bin Laden photo eventually will be released
Osama bin Laden, al Qaeda's leader, seen in an undated photo.
May 3rd, 2011
10:35 PM ET

Panetta says he thinks bin Laden photo eventually will be released

[Updated at 10:33 p.m.] Vice President Joe Biden commended the team responsible for taking down Osama bin Laden in a stealth operation that showed "there's no place you can hide" from the United States.

"It was a staggering undertaking and there was no one else, I believe, other than an American group of military warriors who could do it. And the world is a safer place today, not only for the American people but for all people," Biden said in a speech at the 2011 Atlantic Council Awards Dinner in Washington.

He also said he was a little surprised by the overwhelming global reaction and offered prayers to victims of terror worldwide.

"They remain in our thoughts and our prayers. But I think one clear message has gone out to the world there’s no place to hide, no place you can hide. The United States decides, from one administration to the next, that we will in fact reach a goal, we are determined and we will relentlessly without any hesitation follow on that commitment. Democrat, Republican, it doesn’t matter."

[Updated at 7:08 p.m.] CIA Director Leon Panetta said Tuesday he thinks a photograph of Osama bin Laden's body will be released at some point, but that it is up to the White House to make the final call.

[Updated at 6:39 p.m.] A few U.S. congressional staffers who received a briefing Tuesday about the raid that killed Osama bin Laden in Pakistan were shown photos of bin Laden's body, a congressional source familiar with the briefing said, according to CNN congressional producer Deirdre Walsh.

One staffer who reviewed the photos suggested they might be too graphic for public release, according to the source.

U.S. officials are weighing whether to release an image of bin Laden's corpse.

[Updated at 6:18 p.m.] A widely distributed photo of a dead Osama bin Laden is fake. A photographer consulted by CNN said the gruesome photograph is most definitely not real, and the Guardian newspaper in Britain reported the picture is actually a combination of two photographs.

Meanwhile, U.S. officials are weighing whether to release an actual image of bin Laden's corpse.

"I'll be candid that there are sensitivities here in terms of the appropriateness of releasing photographs of Osama bin Laden in the aftermath of this firefight," White House Press Secretary Jay Carney told reporters Tuesday. "We're making an evaluation about the need to do that."

[Updated at 5:03 p.m.] U.S. commandos shot Osama bin Laden when he made a threatening move during the Americans' raid on his compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan, a U.S. official said, according to CNN's Pam Benson.

Earlier today, White House Press Secretary Jay Carney said bin Laden was not armed when U.S. forces shot and killed him.

When Benson asked the first U.S. official whether bin Laden tried to grab a weapon or physically attack a commando, the official said only, "He didn't hold up his hands and surrender."

Recapping the five compound occupants who U.S. officials say were killed in the assault: Bin Laden; two al Qaeda couriers; one woman; and a son of bin Laden. A second woman - one of bin Laden's wives - was shot in the leg, but not killed, after she rushed the commandos, Carney said earlier today.

The woman who was killed was shot "in crossfire" on the first floor where the couriers were killed, and it's not clear whether anyone was using her as a human shield, Carney told reporters today.

The official who spoke to Benson said no other person - dead or alive - besides bin Laden was taken from the compound.

FULL POST

Rescue efforts underway after explosion in Mexican mine traps 14
May 3rd, 2011
09:25 PM ET

Rescue efforts underway after explosion in Mexican mine traps 14

[Updated at 9:25 p.m.] Rescue efforts were starting Tuesday night at a mine in northern Mexico where 14 workers were trapped in a mine shaft after an explosion, state media reported.

A local civil protection official said toxic gases had dissipated enough to allow rescuers to begin exploring the mine's tunnels, the state-run Notimex news agency said.

The mine is located just outside Sabinas, Mexico, in the heart of Mexico's coal mining region.

[Updated at 2:11 p.m.] An explosion left 14 miners trapped inside a mine shaft just outside of Sabinas, Mexico, in the heart of Mexico's coal mining region, Mayor Jesus Montemayor Garza told CNN Tuesday.

The blast at a mine run by the company BIMSA happened Tuesday morning, the mayor said.

"It's very painful for us," Montemayor said. "At this time we don't know if the 14 miners trapped are dead or alive. It's going to be a complicated operation because of the way the mine shaft was built."

The mine shaft is 60 meters (197 feet) deep, he said.

"We're all hoping the miners are still alive," he added.

Sixteen rescuers from the Coahuila state civil protection agency were working at the site, and 20 other rescuers were in the area ready to relieve the first group, the mayor said.

Methane gas in the shaft was complicating and delaying rescue attempts, he said.

CNN's Rafael Romo contributed to this report.

FULL STORY
Post by:
Filed under: Mexico • Mine accidents • Mining
Stocks struggle as oil prices decline
May 3rd, 2011
08:42 PM ET

Stocks struggle as oil prices decline

Some highlights from the day's business news:

U.S. stocks struggled for a second session on Tuesday, as disappointing corporate earnings and a steep drop in the price of oil weighed on the broader market.

The Dow Jones industrial average finished mostly unchanged, rising less than a point, to close at 12,808.

The biggest drag on blue chips was Pfizer, which reported earnings per share that beat by just a penny. The drugmaker reaffirmed its outlook, but investors were hoping for more. Shares fell 3%.

Financial shares were among the top performers in the Dow, with Bank of America and JPMorgan Chase closing up more than 1.5%.

The energy sector was the biggest weight on the broader market as oil prices retreated sharply, settling down 2.2% to $111.05 a barrel. Chevron shares fell 2%, ConocoPhilips shares dropped more than 4% and Exxon Mobil was down less than 2%.

FULL POST

Post by:
Filed under: Business • Economy
Overheard on CNN.com: To release or not release images of bin Laden's body?
May 3rd, 2011
06:13 PM ET

Overheard on CNN.com: To release or not release images of bin Laden's body?

Photos of bin Laden’s body spark debate

As the White House deliberates on whether to make public pictures of Osama bin Laden's dead body, Americans are debating whether they should be.

CNN.com readers said the release could fuel more hatred from Osama bin Laden’s followers while others say that it’s only fair to release the photos considering the terrorist leader had such little regard for those he killed.

laxfan12983 said, “I for one would like to see the entire video. I have been given not a shred of proof that we even captured anyone. Sure a picture would be nice, but this idea that ‘it’s too graphic for the masses,’ if you don't like it don't watch it.” scratchee responded, “I can't believe that all this could go down without the President delivering a dossier of proof to laxfan12983. Next you'll tell me they didn't even tell you about the raid in advance.”

ford429 said, “Show the live feed of the kill shot, not some static photo of a corpse. I want to see him alive before they shot him. Otherwise it does not explain why they buried him at sea after only 10 hours when they had 14 more hours before the 24 hours was up.” tjaxxx said, “The conspiracy theories have reached an unbelievable high all over the world since Bin Laden's death was announced. The White House needs to release the photos, as graphic as they may be.”

JimfromTexas said, “Release the photos and the videos as well. No consideration or social value was given to our citizens and other citizens of the world on 9/11 as they lay dead and dying on TV and in the news print. No worry about how explicit that was!” SthPhilly said, “I've had to see videos and pictures of 9/11 and what Osama had done to our country, I think it's only fair that I get to see what we've done to him.” ddiamondd said, “I believe he's dead AND I want to see the pictures. I don't care who gets mad. If they get mad, chances are they hate us anyway.”

Dulcimer said, “Don't do it! Conspiracy/hoax theorists do not operate on logic and evidence. Do not offer any memorial to this guy.” snowbelle said, “Nothing to be gained by showing any dead person's photo. Why inflame anyone, why continue to make this entire scene more emotionally overheated?” Tetrapod said, “They have to consider the impact of such images in the Muslim world. Is it worth it to release pictures and video that may enrage Muslims and trigger violence, just for the meager reward of maybe convincing a few people that he's dead? It's not an easy choice.” But TheDopePope simply said, “We don't need this crap released. He's dead, it's done, moving on.”

FULL POST

May 3rd, 2011
02:08 PM ET

Agent who checked in 9/11 hijackers: Bin Laden death brought 'great joy'

At 5 a.m. Monday, Michael Tuohey turned on his television and saw video of President Obama announcing that Osama bin Laden had been killed.

He pumped his fist in the air and shouted "Yes!" like many Americans had upon hearing the news. Like his countrymen, it took him back to September 11, 2001 - but not to the images of the twin towers or the Pentagon. Instead, he recalled the glaring eyes of Mohamed Atta, the leader of the group of hijackers, staring back at him at the US Airways counter at Portland (Maine) International Jetport before a flight to Boston about 5 a.m. September 11.

"I see his eyes all too often," Tuohey told CNN. "And of course I pictured them again (Monday). Unfortunately, I still get flashbacks."

Despite a gut feeling about Atta and traveling companion Abdulaziz Alomari, the ticket agent checked in the two men who would help bring al Qaeda international infamy on September 11. Tuohey said there was nothing the pair did that could elevate his concerns to the point where he wouldn't be able to issue a ticket: There wasn't a one-way ticket bought in cash or anything else actionable.

"They didn't walk up there green and try and pull this off," Tuohey told CNN affiliate WCSH. "They knew what I would be looking for. They knew what they wanted to hear. This was not a fly-by-night, 'let's walk up and see if we can do this.' "

So nearly 10 years later, the death of the man who indirectly sent the hijackers to his counter was met with happiness and a "sense of satisfaction."

"I was fist-pumping at 5 in the morning," Tuohey told CNN. "It brought me great joy."

Tuohey said that though he tries not to let the past get to him, he couldn't help but have strong emotions.

"I got a little choked up, because just knowing, you can't help but reflect back," he told CNN. "I thought about things that happened; it ran through my mind again: those people on the roof of the building, the terror and the horror that was in their mind at the time." FULL POST

Will bin Laden death image silence doubters or fan flames?
A passer-by looks at newspapers reporting the death of Osama bin Laden.
May 3rd, 2011
12:56 PM ET

Will bin Laden death image silence doubters or fan flames?

While the White House and the CIA deliberate whether to release a photo of Osama bin Laden's body, there's debate outside the White House on what impact such graphic images might have.

A key counterterrorism adviser to President Barack Obama said that if the White House does decide to release images, it wants to do it in a "thoughtful manner."

"We also want to anticipate what the reaction might be on the part of al Qaeda or others to the release of certain information so that we can take the appropriate steps beforehand," John Brennan, deputy national security adviser for counterterrorism and homeland security, said on CNN's "American Morning" on Tuesday. "So any other material, whether it be photos or videos or whatever else, we are looking at it and will make the appropriate decisions."

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Mike Rogers, a Republican from Michigan, said he was conflicted over whether the administration should release an image of bin Laden.

"It's something that we're gonna have to work through," Rogers said. "We want to make sure that we maintain dignity, if there was any, in Osama bin Laden, so that we don't inflame problems other places in the world, and still provide enough evidence that people are confident that it was Osama bin Laden."

A senior government official involved in the discussions told CNN's John King that the photo release "could" come Tuesday by the CIA, adding that no decision has been made at the White House.

A government official familiar with intelligence matters says deliberations are leaning toward release and said that there is "growing consensus" to release the photo but emphasizes, "it isn't unanimous and everyone has understandable hesitation."

A senior U.S. official told CNN's Jessica Yellin that the photos were taken at a hangar in Afghanistan. The official described it as a clear picture of bin Laden's face, but he has a massive open head wound across both eyes.

Emad El-Din Shahin, a professor of religion at the University of Notre Dame, said the administration is in a "tough situation."

FULL STORY
Post by:
Filed under: Al Qaeda • Osama bin Laden • September 11 • Terrorism
Tuesday's intriguing people
Ex-Pakistani leader Pervez Musharraf says second-guessing his country's role in the war on terror damages U.S.-Pakistani ties.
May 3rd, 2011
11:18 AM ET

Tuesday's intriguing people

Pervez Musharraf

Pakistan's former president appeared on CNN's "Anderson Cooper 360°" on Monday evening, offering a curious, if not contradictory account of his views on Osama bin Laden's whereabouts in recent years. A key ally in the U.S. war on terror until his ouster in 2008, Musharraf said he’d always known that bin Laden was in either Afghanistan or Pakistan. That remark drew protests from host Anderson Cooper who insisted that Musharraf always denied that his country was harboring the terrorist.

“Anyone who said (bin Laden’s) in Pakistan also didn't have the intelligence (to prove it)," Musharraf said. “(Bin Laden being in Pakistan) was not based on any intelligence. It was guesswork."

Musharraf then blamed intelligence sources for the fact that bin Laden was in an urban area, so close to the Pakistan Military Academy and the capital of Islamabad not in an Afghan cave, as many had speculated. Second-guessing Pakistan’s cooperation in the war on terror only destroys trust between Pakistan and the U.S., he said.

Musharraf finished the interview by saying that while eliminating bin Laden is a good thing for "peace-loving people," having the U.S. military enter Pakistan doesn’t go “with Pakistan's sensitivities.”

“We cannot indicate in any form that we are willing to compromise on our sovereignty like that,” he said.

FULL POST

Gotta Watch: Behind the scenes of bin Laden's killing
Top U.S. leaders receive an update on the mission against Osama bin Laden.
May 3rd, 2011
11:14 AM ET

Gotta Watch: Behind the scenes of bin Laden's killing

The hunt for Osama bin Laden that went on for almost a decade led to a final mission that was completed in a matter of minutes. But how? The mission utilized specialized troops, heavy government coordination and extreme precision. Go behind the scenes of this tactical operation in today's Gotta Watch.

Night of the killing- What really happened the night the U.S. killed Osama bin Laden?  Pentagon correspondent Chris Lawrence takes a close look at the operation that took down one of the world's most elusive and feared terrorist leaders.

FULL POST

Missing Boy Scout troop found in Arkansas national forest
Arkansas authorities found the scouts Tuesday after they went missing in the Ouachita National Forest.
May 3rd, 2011
08:50 AM ET

Missing Boy Scout troop found in Arkansas national forest

A Boy Scout troop from Lafayette, Louisiana, which was missing after a weekend camping trip in an Arkansas national forest, was found safe on Tuesday, officials said.

The campsite of troop No. 162 in the Ouachita National Forest was spotted by a National Guard helicopter, said Jerry Elizandro, spokesman for the Montgomery County Emergency Management Agency.

The scouts were being transferred by helicopter to a command post, said Art Hawkins, scout executive for the Evangeline Area Council of Boy Scouts of America. All the boys are fine, he said. Officials hope to find out what happened from the scout master later, he said.

FULL POST

Post by:
Filed under: Louisiana
May 3rd, 2011
07:36 AM ET

Tuesday's live video events

Watch CNN.com Live for continuing coverage on reaction and fallout to the death of Osama bin Laden.

Today's programming highlights...

10:00 am ET - Bin Laden death briefing - Sen. Dianne Feinstein, who chairs the Senate Intelligence Committee, briefs reporters on the U.S. operation that killed Osama bin Laden.

FULL POST


Filed under: Afghanistan • Al Qaeda • Alabama • Barack Obama • Congress • District of Columbia • Military • National security • Natural Disasters • On CNN.com today • Osama bin Laden • Pakistan • Politics • Security • Terrorism • U.S. • World
May 3rd, 2011
07:02 AM ET

Five arrested near U.K. nuclear plant on suspicion of terrorism

Five men were arrested Monday on suspicion of terrorism after a vehicle was stopped close to the Sellafield nuclear facility in West Cumbria, the Cumbria Constabulary said Tuesday.

The men, all in their 20s and from London, were arrested after police officers from the Civil Nuclear Constabulary conducted a "stop check" on the vehicle, the constabulary said. Cumbria Constabulary officers arrested the men.

The suspects were taken to police custody in Carlisle overnight and were to be transported to Manchester Tuesday morning, police said.

Roads were closed in the area briefly at the time of the arrests, Monday afternoon, authorities said. No further information was released.

Post by:
Filed under: Terrorism • United Kingdom
Air France jet crash's cockpit voice recorder found
Members of the Brazilian Navy search for debris and victims from Air France flight 447.
May 3rd, 2011
06:15 AM ET

Air France jet crash's cockpit voice recorder found

[Updated at 6:23 a.m.] The cockpit voice recorder from an Air France plane that crashed mysteriously nearly two years ago, killing all 228 people on board, has been found, the head of the company announced Tuesday.

The announcement came "only hours" after the recovery of the flight data recorder's memory unit, Air France chief executive Pierre-Henri Gourgeon said, citing the official French air accident investigation agency, the Bureau d'Enquetes et d'Analyses (BEA).

He called it "another decisive step forward in the inquiry" into the cause of the crash, which remains unknown nearly two years after it happened.

Air France flight 447 crashed in stormy weather en route to Paris from Brazil on June 1, 2009. It took nearly two years and a massive undersea search to locate the bulk of the wreckage deep in the Atlantic Ocean.

Only about 50 bodies were ever found, but investigators announced last month that the fuselage still contained human remains.

The discovery of the two data recorders may finally explain why the Airbus A330 dropped out of the sky and bellyflopped into the ocean, falling so quickly that air masks did not have time to deploy.

The cockpit voice recorder was brought to the surface by the Remora 6000, the same remote-controlled submarine that brought the flight data recorder memory unit up from the Atlantic on Sunday, the BEA said.

FULL POST

Post by:
Filed under: Missing plane • Travel