Presidential candidates' maladies at a glance
Back pain would stop President Kennedy, shown with daughter Caroline in August 1963, from lifting his kids.
July 21st, 2011
08:45 PM ET

Presidential candidates' maladies at a glance

Much was made of U.S. Rep. Michele Bachmann’s migraines this week, making her the latest in a long string of U.S. presidential candidates whose health has been put under a public microscope.

Candidates with far more life-threatening conditions have pressed on with their campaigns, and some have been elected. Here are some examples of politicians who dealt with serious (or reportedly serious) health issues during their presidential or vice presidential campaigns, with varying degrees of public awareness.

Franklin D. Roosevelt (president, 1933 to 1945)

Roosevelt’s paralysis in the legs at age 39 (officially from polio, though the diagnosis has been questioned) wasn't exactly a secret when he ran for president 11 years later. But he and the press didn't go out of their way to emphasize it. He was rarely photographed in his wheelchair, for example. He also got around with canes, leg braces and help from aides, and managed a type of walking by "using his hips to swing his atrophied legs forward," the University of Virginia’s Miller Center says in a Roosevelt profile.

Public appearances, such as one in which he "walked" to a podium in 1928 at the Democratic National Convention to nominate Alfred E. Smith for that party’s presidential nomination, "helped dispel rumors about his illness," the center's profile says.

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NFL owners vote to end lockout
The NFL is prepared to open training facilities Saturday, league commissioner Roger Goodell says.
July 21st, 2011
07:45 PM ET

NFL owners vote to end lockout

NFL owners have approved a 10-year revenue-sharing agreement with players, Commissioner Roger Goodell announced Thursday evening.

"We will be prepared to open training facilities Saturday," Goodell said Thursday. "It is time to get back to football. That is what everyone here wants to do."

The August 7 preseason Pro Football Hall of Fame Game between the Chicago Bears and St. Louis Rams has been canceled due to time constraints, he said. The regular season is supposed to open on September 8.

The league's 32 owners, who were meeting in Atlanta, agreed to end the current lockout in a 31-0 vote.

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Official: U.S. military ready to accept gay, lesbian troops
July 21st, 2011
07:12 PM ET

Official: U.S. military ready to accept gay, lesbian troops

The Pentagon is set to certify that the U.S. military is prepared to accept openly gay and lesbian service members, and doing so will not harm military readiness, a U.S. official told CNN on Thursday.

An announcement of that certification which is required to repeal the "don't ask, don't tell" policy is likely to come Friday, according to the official, who spoke on condition of not being identified.

Under a bill passed last year that set up a process for repealing the controversial policy, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta and Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Adm. Mike Mullen, along with President Barack Obama, have to sign a certification that confirms the military's ability to accept the integration of openly gay and lesbian troops.

Even after certification, there will be a 60-day waiting period before the repeal is fully implemented.

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Filed under: Don't Ask Don't Tell • Gay and lesbian • Military
Artist Lucian Freud dies
Artist Lucien Freud, seen here in 1952, was considered Britain's greatest realist painter of the modern era.
July 21st, 2011
05:44 PM ET

Artist Lucian Freud dies

Artist Lucian Freud, best known for his nude, fleshy portraits that broke auction house records, died at the age of 88, his publicist said Thursday.

The German-born, British painter died of illness in his London home Wednesday night, his dealer, William R. Acquavella, said in a statement.

“My family and I mourn Lucian Freud not only as one of the great painters of the twentieth century but also as a very dear friend.  As the foremost figurative artist of his generation he imbued both portraiture and landscape with profound insight, drama and energy.  In company he was exciting, humble, warm and witty. He lived to paint and painted until the day he died, far removed from the noise of the art world," said Acquavella, owner of Acquavella Galleries in New York.

The grandson of psychoanalysis pioneer Sigmund Freud, Freud was widely regarded as the greatest British realist painter of his time. He often used friends, family and acquaintances as subjects.

"I paint people... not because of what they are like, not exactly in spite of what they are like, but how they happen to be," he said, according to Tate Britain's website.

His 1995 life-size painting "Benefits Supervisor Sleeping" fetched $33.6 million during bidding at Christie's auction house in New York in 2008, setting a new world record at the time. The previous record was for "Hanging Heart," a painting by Jeff Koons that sold for $23.5 million, said Rik Pike, a spokesman for Christie's.

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Overheard on CNN.com: Is death penalty a necessary evil?
"I cannot tell you that I am an innocent man. I am not asking you to feel sorry for me," said Mark Anthony Stroman.
July 21st, 2011
04:40 PM ET

Overheard on CNN.com: Is death penalty a necessary evil?

Comment of the Day:

"This guy was not a 9/11 revenge killer. He was a sociopathic criminal with a long history of violence and robbery. I am not a proponent of the death penalty necessarily, but I do not weep for him."–dkgolfer71

Texas man executed for post-9/11 murder

The execution of convicted murderer Mark Anthony Stroman Wednesday night had many CNN.com readers arguing for the death penalty. Stroman was convicted of killing Vasudev Patel during a shooting rampage, purportedly in revenge for 9/11. Stroman told CNN in a recent interview, "I am a human being and made a terrible mistake out of love, grief and anger, and believe me, I am paying for it every single minute of the day."

Maccaman said, "While I do not 'like' the death penalty, it is a necessary evil. There are evil people in this world who simply need to face the ultimate punishment for heinous crime. Forgiveness is one thing I believe in, but accountability is just as important. People die accidentally every day in horrible ways. Why is putting a killer to death so shocking in this world where death is a fact of life?"

TangataNY said, "Ironic. The 9/11 terrorists, Stroman, and the U.S. Supreme Court have something in common: they all believe that you can make the world a better place by killing people."

wilbert3 said, "He should have been executed, and I am white, so it is not about discrimination. I believe anyone who intentionally kills someone else should be put to death. As a juror, I would have to believe the person did it and intended to do it beyond a reasonable doubt. Once all people know what will happen to them and it will be severe, they just might think ahead regarding their actions."

Others expressed concern over mistakes made during the judicial process. sarge106 said, "I am NOT liberal, or democrat, but there are those 139 men on death row that have been freed because of DNA testing: 139 of the wrong guys on their way to the gallows. It does cause me to wonder, and I am a bloodthirsty barbarian." fistv said, "I agree, more than 200 have been found innocent. However, this animal did what he did without a shadow of a doubt; the sad part was it took so darn long to juice the monster."

Regardless of their stance on the death penalty, CNN.com readers had warm words for Rais Bhuiyan. Blinded in one eye during the rampage, he later campaigned to save Stroman's life. HolyFrijoles said, "For Bhuiyan to forgive and then go on to pursue a stay of execution is remarkable, something beautiful in a very ugly story."

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July 21st, 2011
03:07 PM ET

Britain's Prince Andrew to give up trade envoy role

Prince Andrew has said he will stand down from his role as Britain's "special representative" for trade and investment.

"As the evolution of my role continues apace and in order to reflect the changes I have outlined, I have decided that the label I gave myself when I began this role of Special Representative has served its purpose and is no longer necessary to the work that I do today and, more importantly, in the future," he said in his annual review.

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July 21st, 2011
02:51 PM ET

Yosemite tragedy underscores dangers of deceptive rivers

The Merced River's unusual force for this time of year made wading near a waterfall particularly deadly for three Yosemite visitors.

Three hikers are presumed dead after being swept over Vernal Fall, a 317-foot waterfall at Yosemite National Park, on Tuesday, according to a National Park Service news release.

Witnesses said the visitors climbed over a guardrail to put their feet in the water about 25 feet from the waterfall's edge. The hikers have been identified as Ramina Badal, 21, and Hormiz David, 22, both of Modesto, California; and Ninos Yacoub, 27, of Turlock, California.

Park officials announced Wednesday that they were presuming the visitors to be dead and will intensify search efforts as soon as the  river reaches a level low enough to look for bodies.

The Mist Trail, where the visitors were hiking, sees about 1,500 guests each day, according to the Park Service. In May, another hiker slipped from the popular trail into the Merced and drowned. Counting Tuesday's accident, there have been six water-related deaths at Yosemite this year.

Western rivers have been at record levels this summer due to large snow packs and a cool spring.

At this point in the year, the Merced would typically be at about a “trickle” at Vernal Fall, said Dave Steindorf, California stewardship director for American Whitewater. Instead, the water is still gushing at levels that are rarely seen past June. Steindorf said this is great news for experienced paddlers but can create especially dangerous situations for hikers, bathers and waders who are less familiar with river hazards.

“Walking out into a river, if you’re up to your knees, that’s about as far as you can go with being able to maintain your footing, even with just moderate force,” Steindorf said.

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SI.com: Yanks' Montero may be trade bait
Yankees catcher Jesus Montero, as good as he is, could be sent packing as the July 31 non-waiver trading deadline nears.
July 21st, 2011
02:25 PM ET

SI.com: Yanks' Montero may be trade bait

Who will stay, and who will go? SI.com's Cliff Corcoran writes that some of the New York Yankees’ top prospects could find themselves out of pinstripes when the July 31 non-waiver trading deadline arrives. Among those who might be traded: catcher Jesus Montero.

"The best hitting prospect in the game prior to Bryce Harper's arrival, Montero projects as a monster bat," Cocorcan writes. "But he has yet to convince anyone he'll remain a catcher, which makes him a poor fit for a Yankees team that has Mark Teixeira signed to play first base through 2016 and may ultimately need to turn the increasingly fragile Alex Rodriguez, signed through 2017, into a designated hitter."

But the Yanks won't be the only team that may start swapping. The San Francisco Giants could give up top pitching prospect Zack Wheeler as they look to build their offense and rest on the pitching laurels of Madison Bumgarner, Tim Lincecum and Matt Cain. Among others who may be traded: catcher Yasmani Grandal (Cincinnati Reds), pitcher Robbie Erlin (Texas Rangers) and pitcher Dellin Betances (Yankees).

Must-watch game tonight:

Detroit Tigers vs. Minnesota Twins (8:10 p.m. ET) – The Tigers will look for their 10th consecutive victory over the Twins at Target Field.

By the numbers

12: Number of years caddie Steve Williams worked for Tiger Woods before their split was announced Wednesday.

15,404: Number of fans who turned out to greet U.S. women's national soccer team stars Abby Wambach, Alex Morgan and others at Wednesday's match between South Florida's magicJack and the Western New York Flash.

12: Number of games in the Texas Rangers' latest winning streak, which ended Wednesday night in a 9-8 loss against the Los Angeles Angels.

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High dew points breed summer misery
When the dew point is high, the sweat on your body will not evaporate, and the body overheats.
July 21st, 2011
02:15 PM ET

High dew points breed summer misery

What's all the talk about a heat dome causing a heat wave that is blistering the eastern third of the nation? You may have heard your local TV meteorologist talk about a "dome of high pressure" being responsible for this heat wave.

Essentially, a heat dome is just another word for a dome of high pressure that forms south of the polar jet stream, usually during the summer months, in the Northern Hemisphere, said CNN meteorologist Chad Myers.

But why has this heat wave been so severe and deadly?

How many times have you also heard, "It's not the heat, it's the humidity," or, "It's a dry heat"? Believe it or not, the amount of water vapor present in the atmosphere can actually make a huge difference in the severity of a heat wave. The amount of moisture the atmosphere holds affects how severe the heat is to the human body.

Meteorologists use the dew point and the current temperature to calculate the heat index. When a parcel of humid air is cooled at a constant atmospheric pressure, the temperature at which water condenses is called the dew point and the condensed water is called dew. The higher the dew point, the higher the heat index, and the more severe the heat is to the body.

Dew points are downright oppressive when they are over 75 degrees Fahrenheit. By contrast, dew points of 40 to 50 degrees are very comfortable. With dry heat (lower dew point) the body can withstand much higher temperatures because when your body sweats, the sweat evaporates and cools the body. However, if the dew point is high, then the sweat on your body will not evaporate and the body overheats, Myers explained.

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Twitter rages: Murdoch's Times of London famine cartoon 'most offensive' thing yet?
An editorial cartoon in the Rupert Murdoch-owned Times of London is causing some outrage on Twitter.
July 21st, 2011
11:45 AM ET

Twitter rages: Murdoch's Times of London famine cartoon 'most offensive' thing yet?

If you thought the outrage over the phone-hacking scandal was starting to die down, The Times of London, one of Rupert Murdoch's own papers, may have brought it straight back into the spotlight.

An editorial cartoon published Thursday morning in the paper with the title "Priorities" shows starving people in Somalia saying "We've had a bellyful of phone-hacking ... " It's causing quite a firestorm on Twitter. You can access the newspaper's site here, but you won't be able to get past the pay wall without a subscription. The paper has not yet returned calls for comment.

The Guardian's Deputy Editor Katharine Viner (@KathViner) tweeted a link to a photo of the cartoon this morning and asked what people thought of it.

And boy, did she get a response. From regular citizens in the U.S. and UK, to politicians, media specialists and PR folks, the responses are rolling in at a mile a minute.

The responses generally fall in one of two directions: utter disgust or the notion that while the cartoon makes a point, having it come from a Murdoch-owned newspaper makes it just straight ridiculous. For some, it's being seen as an attempt to try to get readers to move away from the story and focus on something else.

The cartoon does come a day after the questioning of British Prime Minister David Cameron, who has also become a part of the phone-hacking story, during which several UK lawmakers argued that perhaps it was time to move on to more pressing issues.

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Record crowd greets soccer hero Wambach in hometown
U.S. soccer star Abby Wambach returned to her hometown of Rochester, New York, on Wednesday.
July 21st, 2011
11:08 AM ET

Record crowd greets soccer hero Wambach in hometown

Huge crowds turned out Wednesday in Rochester, New York, to see hometown soccer star Abby Wambach and other members of the women's World Cup second-place team.

A record 15,404 people attended Wednesday night's Women's Professional Soccer league match between Wambach's pro team, the magicJack team from South Florida, and the Western New York Flash. The attendance was a record for any game in the history of the six-team women's pro league.

The Flash won, 3-1, but Rochester native Wambach was clearly the hero of the night, getting a key to the city from Mayor Tom Richards and a proclamation of "Abby Wambach Day" in Rochester. Wambach, who scored four goals in the World Cup in Germany, did not play in Wednesday's match because of an injured Achilles tendon.

"I'm proud that I was here tonight," Wambach told the crowd, according to CNN affiliate WHEC-TV. "Rochester came out for a WPS attendance record, and I think that goes to show how much Rochester supports soccer. It's a great night, a night to remember."

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The (World Eskimo-Indian) Games have begun
The four-man carry is but one of several competitions at the World Eskimo-Indian Olympics, which runs through Saturday.
July 21st, 2011
09:06 AM ET

The (World Eskimo-Indian) Games have begun

[Update] The games are in full sway in Fairbanks, Alaska, home of the World Eskimo-Indian Olympics, featuring some of the most awesome, and unusual, competitions you've likely never heard of.

The event, in its 50th year, is centered around competitions based on techniques and activities tied to surviving in the Arctic.

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Pearl Harbor skull may be from Japanese aviator
Japan lost 29 aircraft and 55 aviators during the Pearl Harbor attack.
July 21st, 2011
08:20 AM ET

Pearl Harbor skull may be from Japanese aviator

U.S. military forensics scientists in Hawaii are investigating whether a skull unearthed during dredging at Pearl Harbor may be from a Japanese flier killed in the December 7, 1941, attack.

Historian Daniel Martinez tells CNN affiliate KHON-TV that based on where the skull was found, it may be that of an aviator from a Japanese torpedo plan that was attacking battleship row and was hit in its engine by anti-aircraft fire from the destroyer USS Bagley.

"Once they came over Hickam Field, they lowered to an altitude of about 35 feet and they're moving across that water at about 150 knots. Well that projectile stopped that plane right in its tracks," Martinez told KHON.

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On the Radar: Snow in Chile, 15 missing boaters, NFL labor talks
A man walks along a snow-covered road in Lonquimay, Chile, about 370 miles (600 kilometers) south of Santiago.
July 21st, 2011
05:58 AM ET

On the Radar: Snow in Chile, 15 missing boaters, NFL labor talks

Three things you need to know today.

Snow disaster: Chilean officials have declared a "catastrophe" in eight municipalities after heavy snow blanketed communities and blocked roads in what the nation's interior minister called a "white earthquake." And more snow is expected.

"It has snowed more than ever," Curacautin Mayor Jorge Saquel told CNN Chile. "This is an anomaly. ... This worries us because the meteorologists assure us that new snowstorms are coming."

In the city of Lonquimay, officials said snow had piled more than 2.3 meters (7.5 feet) high.

Interior Minister Rodrigo Hinzpeter on Wednesday called the situation a "white earthquake" and asked the country's military and public works officials to help citizens in some of the hardest-hit areas in the country's central Araucania region.

"This storm is strong and it is likely that in the coming days we could suffer from more bad weather fronts, more heavy snowfall, that make the situation even worse," Hinzpeter said.

Search for 15 missing boaters: The U.S. Coast Guard, with international assistance, continued an expansive search Thursday for 15 people missing after a skiff disappeared about 600 miles southeast of Guam.

"We're now almost 27 hours into the search and so far we've covered over 9,300 square nautical miles of ocean," Coast Guard Ensign Richard Russell said shortly after noon Thursday in Guam (shortly after 10 p.m. Wednesday ET).

Russell said searchers had not found any sign of the boat or the passengers and crew.

The small boat, which carried six children and nine adults, was last seen near Chuuk, a group of islands in the Federated States of Micronesia, on Monday, said the Coast Guard.

It was headed for tiny Ruo Island, also part of the federation, about 70 miles northeast of Chuuk, said the Coast Guard.

NFL lockout: There are signs that the bitter labor battle between the National Football League owners and players could end as early as Thursday.

The league's 32 owners are scheduled to meet in Atlanta on Thursday, where they are expected to vote on a new labor agreement with the players' union, the NFL said.

Both the owners and players are expected to have separate votes that could end the work stoppage.

 

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Filed under: Chile • Football • Guam • On the Radar • Pro football • Sports • Weather • Winter weather