Occupy Wall Street ignites in other cities: 'We want justice'
A sign Monday in Washington's Freedom Plaza expresses the sentiments of protesters.
October 10th, 2011
03:31 PM ET

Occupy Wall Street ignites in other cities: 'We want justice'

The Occupy Wall Street movement, an organic, rolling outcry that blames many of the nation's problems on corporate greed, continued to gain momentum Monday as it entered its fourth week.

Protests were planned for several cities Monday, including Atlanta and Oakland, California, according to activist websites.

Starting in New York and spreading almost daily, protesters have vowed to hunker down, or "occupy" stretches of public property to raise awareness of the myriad economic problems facing young and old Americans.

David Pitman, a protester in Somerville, Alabama, said the movement is not partisan and will remain resilient.  "We refuse to play party games, and we won't re-elect liars and scoundrels," he told CNN in an e-mail Monday. "And we want justice, impartially, (for) the rich AND poor."

Calling themselves the "99%,” demonstrators have sprouted a movement powered by social-networking sites and handwritten posters. Several posts on social-networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter called attention to rallies this week, organizing provisions for food, blankets and the like.

On Monday, the Rev. Al Sharpton broadcast his syndicated radio show in New York’s Zuccotti Park, the epicenter of the protests.

Also, Ben & Jerry’s issued a statement of solidarity with the Occupy Wall Street movement over the weekend, saying, “The inequity that exists between classes in our country is simply immoral."

“We realize that Occupy Wall Street is calling for systemic change. We support this call to action and are honored to join in this call to take back our nation and democracy,” the ice cream company, which is known for championing liberal causes, said on its website.

By the numbers

1,326 - The number of cities where Occupy protests were planned as of Monday. Aspen, Colorado; South Bend, Indiana; and Fort Worth, Texas, were among several cities preparing for rallies Monday, according to OccupyTogether.org, an unofficial hub of the movement.

$1.9 million - The amount in overtime pay that the movement has cost the New York City Police Department, NYPD Raymond Kelly told CNN affiliate NY1.

32 - The number of protesters arrested early Monday outside the Iowa Capitol, state public safety department spokeswoman Jessie Lown said. "They did not have a permit," she said, adding that “they still have a right to gather there, sing songs, have picnics whatever. But they have a right to be there until 11 o’ clock, when the park closed and they were warned multiple times.”

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Filed under: Economy • Jobs • New York • U.S.
soundoff (93 Responses)
  1. Parker East

    Here is my contribution to the movement so far. Pass it along.

    [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h6xrMZwnS-o&w=640&h=390]

    Worth watching...

    October 12, 2011 at 5:30 am | Report abuse |
  2. Mohammad Farooqui

    Today fact is Corporate control Governments and economy not people as believe in democratic countries. These corporate funds Presidents candidates and pay huge amount to parties to keep there offices and members. If today some body think to make winnable party beyond Republican and Democrats , then it next to impossible. it is because no one else can such huge member coverage and money to contest. That is the reason in current system you have 10% unemployment but country is no 1 economy. Joke!!

    October 13, 2011 at 11:41 am | Report abuse |
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