November 7th, 2011
10:30 AM ET

Oklahoma can expect more quake aftershocks, USGS says

Aftershocks from Saturday's 5.6-magnitude earthquake in Oklahoma are likely to continue for weeks or even months, the U.S. Geological Survey says, but rattled residents can expect them to decrease in intensity.

The USGS says dozens of aftershocks from the temblor, and a 4.7-magnitude foreshock, have been recorded since the 5.6 quake hit at 10:53 CT Saturday night.

The Oklahoma Geological Survey says the quake was the largest ever to strike in the state, topping a 5.5-magnitude temblor that struck on April 9, 1952.

Saturday's quake was centered about four miles east of Sparks, in Lincoln County, Oklahoma. The USGS says on its website that it has not been able to determine what fault line the quake occurred on, but scientists are focusing on the Wilzetta fault, which they describe as one of a series of small faults that formed in the area about 300 million years ago. If the Wilzetta fault did rupture Saturday, it would be the first time a surface-rupturing quake has been recorded on it.

All previous surface-rupturing quakes in Oklahoma have occurred on the Meers fault, in the south-central portion of the state, the USGS says.

Damage from Saturday's quake was slight, with The Oklahoman newspaper reporting minor damage to 12 homes and a buckling of U.S. Highway 62 near the epicenter in Lincoln County.

But the quake was anything but minor to one couple whose home sits near the epicenter. The chimney of Joe and Mary Reneau's home came crashing through their roof in Prague, Oklahoma, CNN affiliate KJRH-TV reported.

"Wham! It wasn't just a sudden bang,” Joe Reneau told KJRH. “This house was rocking and rolling."

But it wasn't just people that the quake stirred up. Birds and bugs were so rattled that they took to flight in massive numbers, enough to show up the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's weather radar, CNN affiliate KTUL-TV reported. Check out the radar images here.

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Filed under: Earthquake • Natural Disasters • Oklahoma
soundoff (341 Responses)
  1. todd in muskogee oklahoma

    @ bradley BOOMER SOONER baby

    November 7, 2011 at 3:15 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  2. OKGuy

    A67 is right based on the Bible and the data. What evidence do you have that shows the Earth is billions of years old? If you say fossil records, I'm really going to start laughing.

    November 7, 2011 at 3:25 pm | Report abuse | Reply
    • GODis

      Carbon dating of just about anything older than 6 thousand years should be enough. The breakdown of the radioisotope carbon-14, is well understood. Dating of once living organisms such as petrified trees, coal, and yes, fossils, to name just a few, give dates many orders of magnitude over 6000 years.

      November 7, 2011 at 3:40 pm | Report abuse |
    • CT

      Yeah, laugh at scientific evidence because it contradicts a book of myths.

      November 7, 2011 at 3:42 pm | Report abuse |
    • DeathsChoice

      "The breakdown of the radioisotope carbon-14, is well understood."... Ug... you need to do some research there bud. Youll find that within the last 3 years they have found that carbon-14 doesnt actually decay at a constant rate and there are many factors (including a newly found radiation that the sun gives off) that they arent sure about. Last year carbon-14 decay was actually 23% faster than the "constant" they understand well... Im not a religious guy... but being an educated human I figured out that our current "science" is best guess... in 200 years they will be laughing at our assumptions like we laugh at the world is flat... We assume we are a lot smarter than we really are.

      November 7, 2011 at 3:50 pm | Report abuse |
    • DJ

      Are you for real? I suppose that you believe that the Earth is flat too???

      November 7, 2011 at 3:50 pm | Report abuse |
  3. Dave

    This is what you get for fracking up your environment.

    November 7, 2011 at 3:28 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  4. josh

    There is alot of "FRACTURING" going on here in north texas and we haven't had any quakes...

    November 7, 2011 at 3:29 pm | Report abuse | Reply
    • SkepticalCindy

      Not exactly true – North Texas has increased seismic activity since fracking began. Here is a scientific site for you to look at:

      http://www.earthworksaction.org/fracturingearthquakes.cfm

      November 7, 2011 at 3:33 pm | Report abuse |
    • Find the Truth

      Not exactly true – North Texas has increased seismic activity since fracking began. Here is a scientific site for you to look at:

      http://www.earthworksaction.org/fracturingearthquakes.cfm

      November 7, 2011 at 3:35 pm | Report abuse |
    • Rick Perry

      LOL, look at the anti-American enviromental bots spamming their hippy crap. BUSTEED

      Go back to your Obamaban terrorist camps and fear the wrath of God!

      November 7, 2011 at 3:50 pm | Report abuse |
    • fiskenmann

      Not exactly true – North Texas has increased seismic activity since fracking began. Here is a scientific site for you to look at:

      http://www.earthworksaction.org/fracturingearthquakes.cfm

      November 7, 2011 at 3:58 pm | Report abuse |
    • Retardocrat

      Not exactly true – North Texas has increased seismic activity since fracking began. Here is a scientific site for you to look at:

      http://www.earthworksaction.org/fracturingearthquakes.cfm

      November 7, 2011 at 4:21 pm | Report abuse |
  5. SkepticalCindy

    Because the evil Dick Cheney was the VP when Fracking began to pick up in intensity, there is no regulation governing the practice. It is proven to cause earthquakes and it contaminates the water table. It is spelled Fracking, BTW. They don't even have to tell us what chemicals they are pumping into the ground. Foolish on our part to let this happen and it will bite us just like not taking care of the air we breath has bitten us.

    November 7, 2011 at 3:29 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  6. kansas gal

    I live in Wichita, KS. and we felt the after shocks and I can only imagine the fear that anyone feels no matter where they are located when an EQ goes down. I am glad to hear that no fatalities have been reported.
    This goes out to all, I wish you a holiday filled with joy and no EQs.

    November 7, 2011 at 3:30 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  7. Old Driller w/no TV

    @Guest...hogwash. Atmospheric pressure is 14.696 psig (pounds per square inch measured by an pressure guage) that does NOT take into account the molecular volume of said air. Since the industrial revolution, pan-evap rates (the scientific measurement of how long it takes water to evaporate) have been reduced, making the actual weight that a column of air excerts on the earths surface less and less ea. year. (and I wish you bozos who didn't work 30 yrs in the oilfield would stop calling fraccing "fracking". Fracturing old oilwells to bring them back to productivity has squat to do with EQ's....you are just mouthing what you heard from the media.

    November 7, 2011 at 3:33 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  8. Non-Okie

    Of course, these quakes coudln't have anything to do with in increase in fracking in Oklahoma, could it? Too bad, OKGuy, that since God just made Oklahoma a couple of thousand years ago (according to you) that he didn't just put all the oil into some handy tanks, so when cars came along we could just pour it out. All those pesky rock stratum down there, what was he thinking? Sheeesh.

    November 7, 2011 at 3:34 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  9. Chris

    Maybe if the sun wasn't exploding there wouldn't be any earthquakes.

    November 7, 2011 at 3:34 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  10. OkeyDokey

    Sorry about all of that. But ... when they're done with the quakes ... could they kinda pass 'em on to Texas when they're done?

    November 7, 2011 at 3:39 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  11. Sunny Murchison

    God Bless Oklahoma! Boomer Sooer

    November 7, 2011 at 3:40 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  12. josh

    well i haven't felt any since i've lived in north texas nor east tx, where they also frac.

    November 7, 2011 at 3:49 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  13. fiskenmann

    "The Oklahoma Geological Survey says the quake was the largest ever to strike in the state, topping a 5.5-magnitude temblor that struck on April 9, 1952."......yepper, shattered that record by a resounding .1!!!

    November 7, 2011 at 3:50 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  14. Old Driller w/no TV

    @Skeptic Cindy...hogwash you too. We know exactly what chemicals are used during drilling operations they are toxic, and that's enough to know. In Germany and California, by law these toxic muds must be reclaimed...at a cost of about 45 dollars for evey bbl. (42 gal) Some wells take hundreds of thousands of bbls to drill, especially ones where circulation is lost, and the toxic mud invades the local aquifer. Other states and countries allow this mud to be dumped into earthen pits, mixed with dry dirt, and have a fence arounf them to keep livestock from getting stuck in the mud. There is acid fraccing, but most fracturing is done with water and polymeres at pressured of 25,000 psig. (that gulf oil "spill" was caused by drilling into a gas pocket of over 100,000 psi bhp(bottom hole pressure) enough to lift 4 miles of drill pipe 60ft up...US Navy x-rays revealed two 30ft. joints of pipe sandwiched in the blowout preventer. The BOP didn't fail like the news said! Halliburtons sloppy cement job is to blame.

    November 7, 2011 at 3:51 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  15. reb084

    tornados, earthquakes, xtreem cold winters, xtreem hot summers its no wonder why the white man sent the indains thier

    November 7, 2011 at 3:52 pm | Report abuse | Reply
    • fiskenmann

      what?

      November 7, 2011 at 3:55 pm | Report abuse |
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