Occupy Wall Street: Homeless but not hopeless
Protester Michelle Obando, right, sits in New York's Zuccotti Park on Wednesday, a day after it was cleared of protesters in a police raid.
November 16th, 2011
05:41 PM ET

Occupy Wall Street: Homeless but not hopeless

The day after police swept through Zuccotti Park in New York - the birthplace of the Occupy Wall Street movement - and pulled down the tents, protesters wandered the streets of lower Manhattan like lost children.

(Click the audio player to hear more on this story from CNN Radio's Steve Kastenbaum)

Police on Tuesday cleared protesters from the park after its owner raised health and sanitation concerns. A judge said that although the demonstrators can return, they cannot camp out there.

Some demonstrators, after the eviction, were weighed down by heavy backpacks filled with everything they had used to create a home in the park. They looked tired, dazed and confused as they wondered what would happen next to their nearly 9-week-old movement, which has been a call to action against unequal distribution of wealth.

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November 16th, 2011
04:33 PM ET

Prosecutor: Mother will be charged in boy's slaying

[Updated at 7:42 p.m. ET] The mother of a 1-year-old boy found dead in Missouri will be charged with killing him, the St. Louis County prosecutor told reporters Wednesday.

The mother, Shelby Dasher, will be charged with second-degree murder, prosecutor Bob McCulloch said.

The accusation comes after the medical examiner ruled that Tyler Daniel Dasher died from multiple blunt force trauma, McCulloch said.

"Ms. Dasher during the interrogation has acknowledged ... she repeatedly struck the baby, primarily because the baby was not cooperating; the baby was crying, the baby was not laying down and wouldn't go back to sleep," he said.

Tyler's body was found in a wooded area about a mile from his home Tuesday. He was reported missing earlier that day.

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Filed under: Crime • Missouri
Overheard on CNN.com: Much ado about six-legged stowaways
A North Carolina couple is suing AirTran because they say they saw cockroaches during their flight.
November 16th, 2011
04:27 PM ET

Overheard on CNN.com: Much ado about six-legged stowaways

Editor's note: Readers have a lot to say about stories, and we're listening. Overheard on CNN.com is a regular feature that examines interesting comments and thought-provoking conversations posted by the community.

"I hate to burst your bubble, but you might need those roaches one day. With in-flight meals being so expensive, a six-legged snack might be ideal. It's fresh too."
–Burnz 

Flying can be a stressful experience with all the crowds, security lines and other hassles. But one couple says during an AirTran flight in September, they saw cockroaches crawl out of air vents and overhead bins. They are now suing the airline.

AirTran sued over cockroaches on flight

Some people weren't buying the story. "I bet he put the roaches into his own carry-on so he could sue the airline," said effonbass. "And I loathe AirTran, but this is taking lawsuits too far."

Others were disturbed by the case. FloydJohnson noted, "I consider it unreasonable to assume any public space can be kept free of insects. I reject the premise that all paying guests of the airline are entitled to 'clean, pest-free' accommodations. Entitlements associated with air travel include safety and (more recently) maximum tarmac waits. If this lawsuit is found valid, any passenger could vindictively introduce insects to an airplane to harm the carrier. The real danger in tight areas is pathogens, not insects."
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Filed under: Air travel • Overheard on CNN.com • Travel
Man arrested in probe of White House bullets
A bullet is believed to have hit an exterior window on the south side of the White House.
November 16th, 2011
02:09 PM ET

Man arrested in probe of White House bullets

Authorities have arrested a man who allegedly was involved in a shooting incident that may be responsible for two bullets found this week at the White House, the U.S. Secret Service said.

Police arrested Oscar Ramiro Ortega-Hernandez near Indiana, Pennsylvania, the U.S. Secret Service said. Authorities say they believe he was involved in a shooting that happened near the White House in Washington, D.C., on Friday night.

Two bullets were found Tuesday, including one that hit an exterior White House window and was stopped by bulletproof glass, and another found on the White House exterior.

Ortega-Hernandez is in the custody of the Pennsylvania State Police.

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Filed under: Crime • District of Columbia
November 16th, 2011
02:07 PM ET

The Reads You Need: Strife-torn Syria

Editor's note: Each day, we'll be bringing you some of the diverse voices from our site and across the Web on the stories causing ripples throughout the news sphere.

Syria has faced a chorus of criticism over its eight-month crackdown on opposition protesters that has left at least 3,500 people dead, according to sources reporting to the U.N.

The calls from other key players in the region for the regime to step down, as well as the Arab League's suspension of the nation from the alliance, have put Syria at the top of the list of countries dealing with the possibility of civil war in the wake of unrest in Tunisia, Egypt, Libya, Yemen and Bahrain.

Syria's regime is showing no indication that it will soften its position, leaving many people asking whether President Bashar al-Assad is open to any outside influence.

Today we're taking a look at the reads you need to dig a little bit deeper into the situation in Syria, a look at why the Arab League has gotten involved and where the country falls in comparison to the rest of the region dealing with the Arab Spring.

Inside Syria's economic implosion

Stephen Starr, a freelance journalist writing for Foreign Policy magazine, says Syria's economy is suffering because of the protest crackdowns and subsequent sanctions against the country, especially tourism. But the business community, which Starr says has long had a good relationship with the regime, isn't exactly ready to challenge Assad.

"A Quran sits atop a 4-foot Sony speaker in Wissam's modern Damascus office. It is 9 a.m., and Wissam, a stout 30-something businessman, seems flustered. He arrived a little late for this interview, wiping beads of sweat off his forehead before sitting down next to a cabinet, where books authored by Bill Gates and Warren Buffett peek out. Wissam's company owns the import rights for Sony products in Syria, but he's unlikely to sell many speakers or flat-screen televisions in the near future.

"Business activity has recovered slightly, but it is still down about 40 percent" since March, when the protests began, he said. "I think companies can survive another six or maybe even 12 months, but beyond that it will be impossible."

Wissam, like others in his position, is trapped. He recognizes the regime's actions have damaged the country's businesses, but feels powerless to do anything about it. "They feel they are under siege, and they won't be moved," he said, referring to the authorities.

Syrian business leaders, with much to lose and deeply fearful of the regime's security apparatus, are unlikely to join the country's ongoing revolt anytime soon. Even the businessmen interviewed for this article blanched upon seeing their remarks about the dismal state of the Syrian economy in print, quickly requesting anonymity to express themselves freely. The government's rose-tinted pronouncements about the condition of Syrian finances aside, there is no doubt that the country's economy is in dire straits."

Read the full story here.

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Overheard on CNN.com: Deciding when it's worth the risk to intervene
Assistant coach Mike McQueary, right, talks with Joe Paterno in January 2010.
November 16th, 2011
12:34 PM ET

Overheard on CNN.com: Deciding when it's worth the risk to intervene

As commenters responded to a recent story about accusations against beleaguered former Penn State coach Jerry Sandusky, they also engaged in a thought-provoking discussion about the difficulty of knowing what to do in a potentially volatile situation.

Assistant coach made sure assault stopped, went to police, he says in e-mail

This story focuses on Mike McQueary, a Penn State assistant football coach, who has been criticized for not doing more in an alleged rape of a boy by Sandusky."I did stop it, not physically, but made sure it was stopped when I left that locker room," he wrote in a November 8 e-mail.

Many were very critical of McQueary and said they would have stopped an incident like the one alleged if they saw it happening. dsalvat1 said, "If I saw something like that, I would get arrested for beating Sandusky to a pulp. I could care less if I was fired, it makes me sick to my stomach how some of you have these 'flexible' morals."

Terryst said, "What DID McQueary see in that shower? Did he see his career ending? Did he witness the Greek tragedy this has become? Did he think about the consequences of speaking out? Did he think his silence would ever come screaming back to bite him in the ___?"

Jangocat wrote, "This lowlife is in damage control mode. The truth is he was more concerned with preserving his cushy job and his schools reputation than he was with doing what's morally right and protecting children."

But then there were others, like herbatious, who wondered: "You never know what you will do in that situation until it happens. People always 'know' what they will do, then rarely act accordingly when actually presented with the situation."

TEA4ever4ALL was also skeptical and wrote, "I have heard that from many people. As a past firefighter and one who has been around for years, I have seen many people say I would have. However, when they get in the real situation, they freeze or do something else. In other words, people will talk the big talk until it comes time to actually act. I'm sure that 1 in 100 people here would do exactly as they say. The other 99 are blowing smoke."

basketcase87 said, "To all those saying 'if I saw that I would...': You probably can't even imagine how disturbing that would be to see. This is one of those situations that you really can't understand, and know how you'd react unless you've been there. I'm sure most of us would like to think that if we lived in Germany during the holocaust, we would've done something, but the reality is most probably wouldn't have. Furthermore, everyone has different ways of dealing with things, and reacts differently. Just because McQueary didn't go into a rage and beat Sandusky to a pulp doesn't mean he didn't do what he could to rectify the situation."

What do you think about commenters' assessments? If you had to act quickly in a hypothetical volatile situation, how would you react?

Join the conversation below and in the latest stories on CNN.com. Or, sound off on video via CNN iReport.

Compiled by the CNN.com moderation staff. Some comments edited for length or clarity.

New Greek PM wins key vote of confidence from parliament
November 16th, 2011
12:25 PM ET

New Greek PM wins key vote of confidence from parliament

[Updated at 12:25 p.m. ET] New Greek Prime Minister Lucas Papademos won a vote of confidence in the Greek parliament Wednesday, paving the way for his interim coalition government to take power.

He won the vote with 255 in favor to 38 against, as 293 votes were cast in the 300-seat Parliament.

[Posted at 11:11 a.m. ET] The new Greek prime minister, Lucas Papademos, faces a vote of confidence in Parliament on Wednesday, following his appointment to replace George Papandreou.

Papandreou quit last week, forced out by public anger at the budget cuts he was pushing through to get international funds to pay his country's debts.

Fears that Greece might default caused shock waves through the European and American banking systems and sent stock markets on a wild ride that at times wiped billions of dollars of value out of existence.

Papademos, a former banker and European Central Bank vice president, became his country's interim prime minister Friday after several days of political wrangling.

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Gotta Watch: How we got to the moon
Apollo 11's lunar module, the Eagle, ascends.
November 16th, 2011
11:06 AM ET

Gotta Watch: How we got to the moon

The first moon landing was one of the nation’s most historic must-see events. An estimated 600 million people around the world tuned in to see Apollo 11 touch down on the moon. Today, the astronauts who flew to the moon are making a rare joint appearance to receive the Congressional Gold Medal, along with former senator and astronaut John Glenn. You’ve no doubt seen the moon landing footage. Now go behind the scenes and learn more about what it took to get Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins to the moon.

Cutting edge – The computer on the lunar module had 36kb of memory—that’s less than a calculator holds now. Check out the giant technological leaps we’ve made since that historic trip.

[cnn-video url="http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/tech/2009/07/20/riddell.uk.apollo.technology.cnn"%5D

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Filed under: Gotta Watch • NASA • Shuttle • Space
November 16th, 2011
11:03 AM ET

Suspected tornadoes, storms cause damage in La., Miss.

Severe weather including suspected tornadoes swept through parts of Louisiana and Mississippi early Wednesday, causing some structural damage, officials said.

No injuries were immediately reported.

A suspected tornado in Tangipahoa Parish moved a home with four people inside off its foundation, but no one was hurt, according to the National Weather Service. A possible tornado also touched down near Kentwood, Louisiana, according to parish emergency management authorities.

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November 16th, 2011
09:58 AM ET

France recalls ambassador to Syria

France has recalled its ambassador to Syria, the French Foreign Ministry said. The move comes after attacks on French missions in Syria.

Earlier Wednesday a fledgling force of Syrian military deserters struck an important government security complex on the outskirts of the capital, a bold strike reflecting the resolve and confidence of the regime's opposition.

This occurred as the Arab League meets Wednesday to reaffirm its decision to suspend Syria's membership, a decision it took over the weekend after President Bashar al-Assad's government failed to abide by a proposal to end a brutal crackdown on protesters.

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Filed under: France • Syria
November 16th, 2011
07:58 AM ET

Syrian defectors strike military target

A fledgling force of Syrian military defectors struck a government security complex on the outskirts of the capital Wednesday, a bold act reflecting the confidence of the opposition forces.

The group, called the Free Syrian Army, said it attacked an air intelligence base in Harasta and planted "powerful explosions inside and around the compound that shook its foundations."

Activists said the army used rocket-propelled grenades and the complex was damaged. The Syrian army also said there are reports of damage at the complex. Harasta is an eastern suburb of the capital, Damascus.

It was one of several actions reported by the opposition force, which has recently emerged as an important factor in the opposition movement as more and more soldiers have left the Syrian army. The opposition force also reported clashes with troops loyal to President Bashar al-Assad in several towns.

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Filed under: Syria
November 16th, 2011
07:46 AM ET

Wednesday's live events

Watch CNN.com Live for continuing coverage on the battle over what to do about the national debt.

Today's programming highlights...

10:00 am ET - TSA anniversary briefing - It's the 10th anniversary of the Transportation Security Administration, but not everyone is going out to buy it a card.  The U.S. Travel Association will release findings from its survey on TSA attitudes and opinions.

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Mario Monti officially appointed Italy's prime minister
November 16th, 2011
07:31 AM ET

Mario Monti officially appointed Italy's prime minister

Mario Monti has officially been appointed prime minister of Italy, Donato Marra of the presidential palace announced Wednesday.

Monti, who will also be finance minister, replaces the flamboyant Silvio Berlusconi, who was forced to resign as the country fights to bring its huge debts under control.

The 68-year-old former European Union commissioner won the backing of Berlusconi's political party and Italy's largest left-wing party on Tuesday.

"I am convinced of the capacity of our country to overcome this difficult time," Monti said.

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Ohio State to Penn State: We support you
Ohio State and Penn State both lost their iconic head coaches to different scandals since they met in Columbus in 2010.
November 16th, 2011
07:18 AM ET

Ohio State to Penn State: We support you

When Penn State arrives for their first road game since the child rape allegations involving Jerry Sandusky broke, they will arrive at a school that knows something about scandals.

That's why Ohio State says they plan a warm welcome for the Penn State football team in Columbus, Ohio, this weekend, and are asking students to do the same.

Jared Kamrass, the undergraduate representative to the University Athletic Council, spoke at a pre-game press conference this afternoon, announcing that OSU students attending the game Saturday should come to the game, looking to represent the campus by being well-behaved at the game.

“Separate to football, we will also be unveiling a social media campaign, encouraging students to change their Facebook and Twitter profile pictures, to an image we have designed, that honors the victims of the alleged tragedies at Penn State,” Kamrass said.

The image includes a blue ribbon which is a common symbol for child abuse prevention.

Ohio State has asked students to change their profile pictures to this logo.

Earlier this year, Ohio State's Jim Tressel, who was seen by many as above reproach, resigned in disgrace after withholding program violations from the NCAA. The Ohio State college newspaper, The Lantern, posted an article about how Joe Paterno's departure sparked reactions similar to what happened with Tressel.

While the OSU scandal was of a very different nature than the one at Penn State, the Buckeyes program was profoundly impacted by the allegations. Several players allegedly swapped team and personal memorabilia and equipment for tattoos and other benefits. Tressel became aware of the transactions, which violate NCAA rules, but did not report them on a form all coaches are required to submit.

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