January 9th, 2012
09:53 AM ET

Nigerians protest end of fuel subsidy

Police and protesters clashed across Nigeria on Monday amid a nationwide strike and widespread protests over a government decision that more than doubled fuel prices in the largely impoverished country.

Among other incidents, police reportedly fired on protesters in the northern Nigerian state of Kano, injuring at least 13 people, according to a physician who was among the protesters.

Demonstrators were gathered listening to speeches when police "suddenly came and some were shooting and some were throwing tear gas," Shehi Ali, vice chairman of the Nigeria Medical Association, told CNN.

Kano Police Commissioner Ibrahim Idris denied that officers fired on protesters. He said that officers were forced to use tear gas on a "miscreants and drug addicts" who had tried to storm the governor's residence.

FULL STORY
Post by:
Filed under: Nigeria • World
soundoff (40 Responses)
  1. Old Driller

    Perhaps the Nigerian "government" should consider NOT exporting oil to foreign couuntries a few days. Imagine if gasoline prices doubled here in the US as most of our domestic oil was being exported to Africa. YOU would be very upset.

    January 9, 2012 at 10:16 am | Report abuse | Reply
  2. Old Driller

    Nigeria is one of the world's TOP TEN oil exporting countries. Nigeria exports about 2 1/2 MILLION barrels of oil per day. Does anyone have any idea where most of that oil goes? (as Africans starve)

    January 9, 2012 at 10:22 am | Report abuse | Reply
  3. Big Tom

    They have no refineries in Nigeria. So they have to export their oil.

    January 9, 2012 at 10:24 am | Report abuse | Reply
    • banasy©

      Yes, I read the story, too.
      Amazing how they have to import their gas, because they have no refineries...

      January 9, 2012 at 10:26 am | Report abuse |
  4. Old Driller

    Does anyone here know how many times Dick Cheney's Halliburton corp. got busted bribing Nigerian leaders? I only know of two. Both times, Halliburton had to pay fines to the same leadership they were bribing. It was like 'double bonus' for the bribe-taking politicians in Nigeria. And i wonder what the worldwide total amount of bribes corporations like Halliburton have made. Anyone have any idea?

    January 9, 2012 at 10:27 am | Report abuse | Reply
  5. Jazzy

    With operations in over a 120 countires from Haliburton alone...it could be an astronomical amount. Your guess is as good as mine.

    January 9, 2012 at 10:43 am | Report abuse | Reply
  6. Old Driller

    ...as if one of the world's leading oil exporters can't afford to build refineries. Interestingly, there hasn't been a new refinery built in the USA in over 20 years. When our refineries max out, our gasoline prices skyrocket. (limited number of refineries equals limited supply) Supply and demand economics hardly applies to the prices of oil and gasoline.

    January 9, 2012 at 12:46 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  7. Jazzy

    This situtation has really been brewing since 2006

    Nigeria sells 40 percent of its huge oil supply to the United States. Nigeria exports 281,291,000 barrels per year (771,000 barrels per day) to the United States, according to the EIA. But Nigeria is feeling the full brunt of the "oil curse." The vast earnings from oil have not translated into substantial improvements for ordinary Nigerians. People living in the oil-producing Niger Delta area, in particular, are very poor and the environment has been degraded by oil drilling.

    Beginning in 2006, this reality led rebel groups to violently protest against the oil pipelines. The Movement for the Emancipation of the Niger Delta attacked and kidnapped foreign oil workers. The rebel insurrection are blamed for causing Nigeria's oil production to drop by as much as 20 percent. Furthermore, Nigeria has experienced 2,400 oil spills since 2006, decreasing the industry’s efficiency, according to Reuters.

    I believe stories like this make our life seem a little better, wouldn't you say?

    I would be fuming too if all my oil was being sold and I was still living in a SHACK!

    America IS far from righteous.

    January 9, 2012 at 12:50 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  8. Obese America

    Most stories like these recieve few comments. How hard is it to understand that the reason African citizens starve is because most of their natural resources (oil, diamonds, etc) goto foreign nations, with the lions's share coming here. Most understand this and would rather not talk about it. Or worse, ridicule anyone who does.

    January 9, 2012 at 1:09 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  9. observer, casual

    @Jazzy. Very good post. I truly appreciate it when people post interesting information. Very well written too. Wtg!

    January 9, 2012 at 1:15 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  10. Jazzy

    Thank you my friend! :)

    January 9, 2012 at 1:33 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  11. Ahkmed the Terror Guy

    At least they aren't to be calling the protesting African citizens "Al Quida" this time around. Maybe for chance it is understood desperate citizens take desperate measures. If for to be my baby starve as you fat, Ahkmed fly toy airplane into post office. Whole building fall down. No mail for you.

    January 9, 2012 at 1:48 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  12. Jazzy

    Ahkmed! You always know how to put things into perspective. :)

    January 9, 2012 at 1:52 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  13. Tabitha

    Very good philip! Post as old driller, and jazzy and then comment on those posts! Regular rocket scientist aint ya? Lol

    January 9, 2012 at 1:53 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  14. Jazzy

    and who may you be 'Tabitha' ? Hmmmm

    January 9, 2012 at 1:55 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  15. banasy©

    @Tabitha:
    New to these blogs? I don't think I've ever talked to you before.

    January 9, 2012 at 1:57 pm | Report abuse | Reply
1 2 3

Post a comment


 

CNN welcomes a lively and courteous discussion as long as you follow the Rules of Conduct set forth in our Terms of Service. Comments are not pre-screened before they post. You agree that anything you post may be used, along with your name and profile picture, in accordance with our Privacy Policy and the license you have granted pursuant to our Terms of Service.