TCU football players among 15 students accused of drug dealing
TCU linebacker Tanner Brock was the team's leading tackler in 2010 before sitting out most of 2011.
February 15th, 2012
08:33 PM ET

TCU football players among 15 students accused of drug dealing

Editor's Note: An earlier version of this report included a photo that showed two football players. Player number 59 was not among those accused of drug dealing by police. We regret the error.

[Updated at 11:08 a.m. ET Thursday] Fifteen Texas Christian University students, including four members of its Top 25 football team, were arrested Wednesday morning on suspicion of selling drugs, the school and police said.

The football players include two defensive starters for last season's squad, which was No. 14 in the final Associated Press poll, plus a junior linebacker who sat out most of 2011 with an injury but was the team's leading tackler in 2010.

The 15 illegally sold marijuana or other drugs, including cocaine, Ecstasy, acid and prescription medicine, to undercover officers during a six-month investigation launched after authorities received complaints about drug activity, TCU Police Chief Steve McGee told reporters Wednesday.

"There is no doubt that all of those arrested today are drug dealers," said McGee, who added that the selling happened on and off the Fort Worth campus. "These individuals engaged in hand-to-hand delivery for money with undercover agents."

School officials said TCU has banned the students from campus, class and school activities, pending the outcome of their cases. TCU Chancellor Victor Boschini said a vice chancellor will "determine what is going to happen to those students, following this."

"What they did, to be honest, is simply unacceptable. This behavior, when reported, is never tolerated at our university," Boschini said at a news conference with McGee and other officials.

An investigation by university and city police continues, and more arrests could come, Boschini said.

The 15 students were among 19 people for whom arrest warrants were issued as part of the probe, Fort Worth police and TCU said late Wednesday. Eighteen of the 19 were arrested Wednesday. Earlier, the school said 17 students were arrested, but "upon further examination of student records, it appears that 15 were students this semester and four were not," TCU spokeswoman Lisa Albert said.

The four football players - junior linebacker Tanner Brock, 21; junior defensive tackle D.J. Yendrey, 20; junior safety Devin Johnson, 21; and sophomore offensive tackle Ty Horn, 21 - were arrested on preliminary charges of delivery of marijuana. Johnson and Brock face felonies, according to arrest warrants released by the Fort Worth Police Department.

Other arrestees face preliminary charges of felony or misdemeanor charges of delivery of marijuana or delivery of a controlled substance, according to Fort Worth police.

The students operated in several groups, and it's not clear whether those groups were connected, a Fort Worth police officer said at the news conference.

Albert said the students' ban from class and activities will remain until the cases are adjudicated. After the judicial process determines whether they are guilty, they "can face a disciplinary process on campus which could result in expulsion," Albert said.

The ban on extracurricular activities includes intercollegiate athletics, Albert said. The four arrested football players were not on the team's online roster Wednesday afternoon.

Head coach Gary Patterson said he was shocked, hurt and then mad after he heard of the arrests Wednesday morning.

"Under my watch, drugs and drug use by TCU's student-athletes will not be tolerated by me or any member of my coaching staff. Period," Patterson said on the school's athletics website. "Our program is respected nationally for its strong ethics, and for that reason the players arrested today were separated from TCU by the university. I believe strongly that young people's lives are more important than wins or losses."

TCU Athletic Director Chris Del Conte said he "will not tolerate behavior that reflects poorly on TCU, the athletics department, our teams or other student-athletes within the department."

"We have an excellent athletics program at TCU, and an indicator of that excellence is the fact that we will not tolerate criminal conduct among our student-athletes," Del Conte said in his online statement.

The arrests come months before the football team, coming off an 11-2 season, prepares to start its first year in the Big 12 conference.

Brock, the linebacker, was an SI.com honorable-mention All-American after leading the Horned Frogs in tackles and fumble recoveries as a sophomore in 2010. But he was limited to one game as a junior, sitting out most of the season with an injured foot.

Johnson, the safety, started eight games in 2011, recording 47 tackles and 2.5 sacks. Yendrey, the defensive tackle, played in every game this past season and was an honorable-mention All-Mountain West Conference selection, recording three sacks and 39 tackles.

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Filed under: College football • Crime • Drugs • Football • Marijuana • Texas
soundoff (298 Responses)
  1. Sagebrush Shorty

    TCU Athletic Director Chris Del Conte said he "will not tolerate behavior that reflects poorly on TCU, the athletics department, our teams or other student-athletes within the department." Right!

    February 16, 2012 at 12:28 pm | Report abuse |
  2. Ricky

    Good Christian folks bringing in whatever thugs it takes to win football games. TCU better start taking the C part a bit more seriously.

    February 16, 2012 at 12:54 pm | Report abuse |
  3. bailey's dad

    Christians, football players, Christian football players, no,no,no. Say it isnlt so. They can't be fooling around with drugs. Next you'll be telling me they are fornicating. Oh the horror...............

    February 16, 2012 at 12:54 pm | Report abuse |
  4. me

    Drugs on campus has gone on for decades, you are not going to stop it... just a mini-failure of the war on drugs. Education is the answer to solving drug problems... legalize drugs and educate... Would you smoke a cigarette? Probably not, and they are legal... so why is that??? My answer is education... nothing wrong with experimentation but dangers should be understood, as should warning signs of addiction/abuse/problems...

    February 16, 2012 at 1:01 pm | Report abuse |
  5. boboTheClown

    bla bla bla, not tolerated, whatever its all the money. Put all in prison except the football players, they bring revenue to the school.

    February 16, 2012 at 1:07 pm | Report abuse |
    • jb

      Bobo is right. That's how things work.

      February 16, 2012 at 1:35 pm | Report abuse |
    • damast

      you are one of the stupidest people ever. It doesn't matter if they bring in revenue for the school. If they broke the law, they should go to jail

      February 16, 2012 at 1:39 pm | Report abuse |
  6. boboTheClown

    bla bla bla, not tolerated, whatever its all about the money. Put all in prison except the football players, they bring revenue to the school.

    February 16, 2012 at 1:08 pm | Report abuse |
  7. Randy in Texas

    Got to love those Christians! They demonize other's yet always fail to look at themselves. 1/4 an ounce or a pound of drugs; DEALING is still DEALING!!!!!

    February 16, 2012 at 1:11 pm | Report abuse |
  8. amy

    There is absolutely NOTHING "Christian" about TCU. Apart from the name and a small divinity program on campus, the university and student body isn't known for its righteousness. Not that I care. Religion is an unnecessary relic.

    February 16, 2012 at 1:12 pm | Report abuse |
    • noname

      very true

      February 16, 2012 at 1:24 pm | Report abuse |
    • WhatWhatWhat?

      Imagine if everyone in the world was a devout believer in Christinsanity. Then, the "end times" would never come because there would be no "evil" to eradicate. Therefore "Revelations" would never come true and the "Bible" would not reflect reality. Now, imagine the Bible not reflecting reality, like a delusion of grandeur...

      February 16, 2012 at 1:37 pm | Report abuse |
  9. joey

    christian hypocrisy, lol

    February 16, 2012 at 1:24 pm | Report abuse |
  10. randy

    this is small time why even waste your time

    February 16, 2012 at 1:27 pm | Report abuse |
  11. Mark Sailors

    It's Marijuana people, not crack, not meth. No one has EVER died from marijuana, EVER. Just another reason marijuana should be legalized.

    February 16, 2012 at 1:29 pm | Report abuse |
    • S&MAN

      True, however, it was NOT just marijuana. As it said in the story; "The 15 illegally sold marijuana or other drugs, including cocaine, Ecstasy, acid and prescription medicine." I'll be the first to agree that marijuana is safer than alcohol, but the others are not. It really is not a road one should want to travel down.

      February 16, 2012 at 1:39 pm | Report abuse |
  12. WhatWhatWhat?

    How dare they sell weed! In Texas, of all places! Drugs are so bad! Why couldn't they just stick with something nice and Texan, like cigarettes and alcohol. That's worked fine up 'till now, hasn't it?

    February 16, 2012 at 1:29 pm | Report abuse |
  13. coder

    when the authorities are not getting their cut
    this is what happens

    February 16, 2012 at 1:30 pm | Report abuse |
  14. DrWu

    Amy is correct. While the school is connected with the Disciples of Christ, there is no religious requirement besides ONE religion class of a student's choosing. But leave it to all the fringe elements to come out howling about the school's lack of "Christianity" as though there was a connection. Do some homework people. Selling drugs, fondling little boys...it's all out there. If you think your local college or University (or even your local high school) is immune, you need to snap that Prozac pill in half and open your eyes. Denial only feeds the problem.

    February 16, 2012 at 1:33 pm | Report abuse |
    • WhatWhatWhat?

      They're especially not immune when those schools and organizations hide behind the veil of religious delusion. Your premise is actually backwards; if an organization is using Christinsanity as a tool, then that's where the problems are going to predominantly lie. Secular organizations, not so much.

      February 16, 2012 at 1:43 pm | Report abuse |
  15. Steve

    No, not those good christian folk down in Texas?!?! Selling weed? Can't be true. What would Rick Perry say? Is this part of the Texas miracle where every Texan that wants a job has a job? Small, minded pea brains. Hypocrites at their peek!
    Seceed already – Oh, that's right. Just pray away the sin and they'll be welcomed into the kingdom anyway. Praise Jesus!

    February 16, 2012 at 1:35 pm | Report abuse |
    • Nah

      steve: "No, not those good christian folk down in Texas?!?! Selling weed? Can't be true. What would Rick Perry say? Is this part of the Texas miracle where every Texan that wants a job has a job? Small, minded pea brains. Hypocrites at their peek!
      Seceed already – Oh, that's right. Just pray away the sin and they'll be welcomed into the kingdom anyway. Praise Jesus!"

      *yawn*

      Troll harder?

      February 16, 2012 at 1:54 pm | Report abuse |
    • Bob

      Besides the fact it’s obvious you hate all things Texas, you’re proving the fact that being hatefully anti-religion is a lot like being religious.

      February 16, 2012 at 2:12 pm | Report abuse |
    • Richard

      Could play Barrel of Monkeys with this Easterner's nose.

      February 16, 2012 at 2:25 pm | Report abuse |
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