TV anchor gives interview after on-air dog bite
Denver news anchor Kyle Dyer received a severe dog bite on air.
February 24th, 2012
11:51 AM ET

TV anchor gives interview after on-air dog bite

A Denver news anchor is speaking out for the first time after being severely injured when a dog bit her on the face during a TV interview.  Earlier this month, Kyle Dyer was interviewing the owner of an 85-pound Argentine Mastiff who was rescued from icy waters. While petting the dog’s face, Dyer leaned in to kiss his nose when the dog lurched forward and bit her face.

Dyer was taken to Denver Health Medical Center where, after four hours of surgery, she received 70 stitches to her lips and nose. She later posted on Facebook that her mouth was stitched shut in order for the skin graft to take.

She is out of the hospital and recently sat down for an interview to discuss the accident and resulting surgery. Dyer is happy that the dog is back with his owners and is pleased to be recovering and moving forward with life. Listen to her describe the bite and the moment she realized she had no upper lip.

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Filed under: Animals • Colorado • Dogs • Media
soundoff (1,025 Responses)
  1. EaglesQuestions

    It's unfortunate that she had such an experience,

    .... but don't kiss a strange dog on the face. Really.
    He's never seen this goofy lady before. He's not going to be comfortable having a stranger's face shoved at him.

    What possesses people to kiss a dog, in the first place?

    February 24, 2012 at 2:03 pm | Report abuse | Reply
    • Marlena

      Seriously. Ew. I have 2 dogs and love them but nothing grosses me out more people who allow dogs to kiss them on the mouths. You realize dogs lick their own buttholes to clean them, right? That's not to mention the myriad of other gross things dogs like to get into to eat where the germs are not only in their mouths but on their snouts. And the MythBusters guys did do an analysis of that whole "dogs mouths are cleaner than humans mouths" thing. Yes, the human's mouth when tested had more bacteria than the dog's BUT the dog's had far more foreign bacteria that a human would probably not normally be exposed to.

      February 24, 2012 at 2:11 pm | Report abuse |
  2. Really???

    It is her own fault for invading the personal space of a dog that is a stranger to her. Common sense dictates that one never do that; dogs can be friendly and nice, however, if they feel threatened, they will attack. I'm just glad to see she made a recovery and holds nothing against the dog.

    February 24, 2012 at 2:04 pm | Report abuse | Reply
    • brian

      Those of us who don't know dogs, don't necessarily know not to put your face in front of a dog. Common sense or not. I don't have this problem with my cat.

      February 24, 2012 at 2:21 pm | Report abuse |
  3. popCorn

    It's kind of stupid. The owner of that dog should've killed that evil dog. Instead, the bring the dog back and bite the anchor. you can't trust evil dog in the house.

    What happen if you have baby in the house? Sometimes dogs can be selfish....

    February 24, 2012 at 2:04 pm | Report abuse | Reply
    • charlotte

      dogs are not evil. Evil is an attribute strictly owned by humans, such as ones who suggest a dog should be killed for defending itself against a hostile act. Yeah, she was trying to kiss it. There is nothing in a dog's natural vocabulary that corresponds to "kiss." A strange animal (in this case a human one) suddenly putting its face near yours is a hostile act that could be an attempt to kill you. You respond instinctively. This woman needs to be educated how to behave around dogs. The only evil one is you, popCorn. You like to kill things just because you don't understand them. You're a horrible excuse of a human being.

      February 24, 2012 at 2:08 pm | Report abuse |
    • lillbit

      you're an idiot...

      February 24, 2012 at 2:12 pm | Report abuse |
    • Joe T.

      I disagree. Animals can be evil. I don't think this dog is evil. It was reacting based off instincts and a perceived threat.

      Dolphins have been known to kill for no reason and without provokation of any kind.

      February 24, 2012 at 2:14 pm | Report abuse |
    • popCorn

      You can't trust evil dog in the house. There's numerous stories about mastiff & pitbull biting next door neighbor and sometimes killing infant. Sometimes mastiff & pitbull can be dangerous to society.

      They are not like friendly dogs such as Border Collie, Labrador Retriever, golden retriever, chow chow.

      mastiff & pitbull - they bite and bark.

      February 24, 2012 at 2:16 pm | Report abuse |
    • Fiona

      Popcorn, your capacity for comprehension is abysmal. The owners did not "bring the dog back." good grief.

      February 24, 2012 at 2:17 pm | Report abuse |
    • charlotte

      @lilbit, how am I an idiot for recognizing the irresponsibility of the newswoman? People who want to kill the dog are the idiots.

      February 24, 2012 at 2:18 pm | Report abuse |
    • Lila

      Good lord you are ignorant and BTW Border Collies have a reputation for being biters.

      February 24, 2012 at 2:21 pm | Report abuse |
    • John

      Really, dogs are evil and cannot be trusted? SELFISH!!! You are beyond ignorant and know NOTHING about dogs. And this comment is laughable "You can't trust evil dog in the house. There's numerous stories about mastiff & pitbull biting next door neighbor and sometimes killing infant. Sometimes mastiff & pitbull can be dangerous to society.

      They are not like friendly dogs such as Border Collie, Labrador Retriever, golden retriever, chow chow.

      mastiff & pitbull – they bite and bark."

      Umm, do some research. Do you know that a POMERANIAN has KILLED AN INFANT? All dogs can POSSIBLY bite and kill. Do you even know what breeds kill people the most, or even bite people the most? Hint, one of those "so called" friendly dogs you listed has killed the Chow Chow is responsible for 8 deaths, the Mastiff, 2 deaths....google is your friend, and can help you get facts instead of spewing uninformed vitriolic hate.

      February 25, 2012 at 9:06 pm | Report abuse |
  4. charlotte

    Good grief, WHAT was she thiking??? You don't shove your face at a dog who doesn't know you, nor do you try to hug it (as much as you may want to). These behaviors are viewed as aggressive in dog-speak and the dog was reacting defensively. I hate to say it, but the bite was the woman's own fault. Apparently she realizes this, thank goodness, and the dog is not going to suffer as a result. And to the moron @thatdogshouldbekilled , you obviously know nothing whatsoever about animals and you should be kept isolated from them for their safety. You don't kill a dog for defending itself against a hostile act. You educate the person who did such a stupid thing. Dogs are not stuffed toys or inanimate objects. We breed them, we sell them, we have them in our world, it is therefore mandatory that we learn how to behave around them or keep the hell away. But don't kill the dog, it isn't the dog's fault.

    February 24, 2012 at 2:05 pm | Report abuse | Reply
    • SteveOfTx

      What if the next person though is a 3 year old child visiting the owner's house who is just trying to give the doggie kisses? Oh yeah I know, well the parent should be watching the child ... or the owner should put the dog up ....
      If you've ever had a 3 year old, you can't keep them sitting in your lap all the time. And owners who have never had any reason to doubt their dog's loving nature always believe that "their dog" couldn't possibly harm anyone. That's why there are so many reports of children getting mauled by known-to-be-aggressive breeds, but this one was the exception.

      February 24, 2012 at 2:31 pm | Report abuse |
  5. Linda

    You never put your face into a dog's face like that, unless you know the dog. It's common sense. I had a tiny poodle who bit a friend in the face when she went in to kiss him. It has nothing to do with the fact that it is a pit.....there a plenty of other breeds that will do this. Of course, a pit will do more damage, but the bottom line is to respect the dog's space. They are not HUMANS! People seem to forget that. They are not for show, they are not for the latest dog fashion, etc.

    February 24, 2012 at 2:05 pm | Report abuse | Reply
    • Lila

      It's a Mastiff not a pit, it's a very common mistake.

      February 24, 2012 at 2:14 pm | Report abuse |
  6. JW

    I really blame the guy who's sitting there holding his leash. Just from the photograph I can read that the dog is not comfortable and he should have been able to read the same thing if he's 1/2 a trainer.

    February 24, 2012 at 2:05 pm | Report abuse | Reply
    • samoht

      Not true at all. In the video, the dog is loving the lady and licking her hands. There was only a split second to react when the temperament of the dog turned from loving to defensive.

      February 24, 2012 at 2:15 pm | Report abuse |
  7. tstorm

    I love my Labs and I kiss them all the time. But they know me very well...that's the difference.

    February 24, 2012 at 2:06 pm | Report abuse | Reply
    • John

      I think the diff is you have Labs – known gentle breed – and that was an overgrown pit bull.

      February 24, 2012 at 2:11 pm | Report abuse |
    • Lila

      Did anyone read the article? Mastiffs are not pits, totally different breed.

      February 24, 2012 at 2:15 pm | Report abuse |
  8. Ted

    Bet the owner says "Argentine Mastiffs" rather than Dogo Argentinos because a lot of people know Dogo Argentinos are breed banned in many countries including the UK because they are known to be a vicious and dangerous breed people import for dog fighting.

    February 24, 2012 at 2:06 pm | Report abuse | Reply
    • Archer

      Actually they aren't bred for dog fighting.... they were bred from a dog that was bred for fighting, but the aggressive temperament was actually bred out so they could be a hunting dog that would cooperate with a pack.. get the facts straight!

      February 24, 2012 at 2:08 pm | Report abuse |
    • Jon

      Dogo means Mastiff in Spanish. So he is just calling it by what it's called in English.

      February 24, 2012 at 2:10 pm | Report abuse |
  9. Donna Bailey

    I've been bitten by more poodles and small breed dogs than large dogs. You CAN'T say that it is this dog's breed that causes it to be more aggressive – ALL dogs have that propensity – PERIOD! They are ANIMALS and as such are unpredictable – they run by instinct whether they are a poodle, a pug, a shepherd or a Dogo Argentini. And whoever commented that they should have a cat instead ..... has obviously never had a cat.

    February 24, 2012 at 2:07 pm | Report abuse | Reply
    • pleasedotell

      Agreed. I've been bitten by my late golden retriever & this was 6 years after raising her as a pup. Problem was it was my fault. I let her off her leash, she got into a fight w/ a German Shepard, and when I tried to pull her away, she bit my hand. I still bare the scars 12 years later. As dog owners, we have to be observant of our dogs and the environment we put them in.

      February 24, 2012 at 2:25 pm | Report abuse |
  10. Sujith

    While I am sorry for what happened to her, these situations are mostly, if not totally, avoidable.
    Never forget that dogs are a nicer, domesticated version of wolves.The "wild, un-predicatable" part is still in them.
    And for gods sake, stop associating (human) emotions with them. Be kind and gentle, but no emotions.
    Lastly, I agree with the former poster, stop crucifying the breed.Enough has been said already. I know several well-behaved, loving pit bulls. Outside the general temperament, how a dog behaves depends on how it was trained.

    February 24, 2012 at 2:08 pm | Report abuse | Reply
    • Joe T.

      It's not a pit bull.

      February 24, 2012 at 2:16 pm | Report abuse |
  11. Putthedogdown

    I agree, that getting face to face with a big dog that you don't know is really stupid, always approach unfamiliar dogs as if you're going to get bit and you won't have a problem. You've heard about the rule, never extend your fingers towards a unfamiliar dog's head, only a clenched fist. That being said, any dog that would bite a non-threatening human in the face has got to be put down and put down fast, next time, the dog is going to kill someone's child. The dog is brain damaged.

    February 24, 2012 at 2:08 pm | Report abuse | Reply
    • charlotte

      you idiot. There was nothing "non-threatening" about that human. Putting your face suddenly in a dog's face like that IS threatening and to suggest the dog should be put down is a brainless and witless remark from an ignoramus. Go educate yourself.

      February 24, 2012 at 2:11 pm | Report abuse |
    • lillbit

      If you're dumb enough to have your brat around any animal without supervision, you are the one that should be put down.

      February 24, 2012 at 2:14 pm | Report abuse |
    • Laurie Lat

      the dog had gone thru so much already and he didn't know that woman and he was in a studio with cameras and lights, he should NOT be put down. he should not have been in that situation after what happened. and she put her face so close and he was licking his lips, she had warning if she knew dog language. don't be so fast to kill the animal.

      February 24, 2012 at 2:17 pm | Report abuse |
    • Putthedogdown

      Ignorant, blind animal lovers like, "charlotte" above are the reason that people get their faces ripped off by chimps and the reason dogs kill a number of children or babies every year. Dogs are just another unpredictable animal with a "wild" element in their genes. Don't ever forget that and you'll be ok. Now, if you'd like to hand me the shotgun, I'll do what needs to be done and the dog won't get the chance to do this again to another person.

      February 24, 2012 at 2:26 pm | Report abuse |
  12. Todd

    Argentine Mastiff...Is that the new name for Pit Bull?

    February 24, 2012 at 2:08 pm | Report abuse | Reply
    • Archer

      THANK YOU!! Geesh.. next thing you know someone will call my Jindo a Shiba Inu, and my Shiba Inu a Jindo!!

      February 24, 2012 at 2:12 pm | Report abuse |
    • Laurie Lat

      ignorant. nothing wrong with pitts. its the "people" who train them to kill. WE do that to dogs, not the dogs fault.

      February 24, 2012 at 2:19 pm | Report abuse |
  13. Vogrog

    Don´t care if the human was being careless...as long as she wasn´t being abusive to the animal, that dog is in the wrong and should be put down. It´s too dangerous to allow a known, physically aggressive dog to continue to be around people.

    February 24, 2012 at 2:08 pm | Report abuse | Reply
    • charlotte

      No, the dog was not in the wrong. You are. Shall we put you down?

      February 24, 2012 at 2:12 pm | Report abuse |
    • lillbit

      Oh for the power to 'put down' idiotic human beings! IT IS AN ANIMAL! If you choose to have it as a pet HAVE SOME FREAKIN COMMON SENSE! The dog was just rescued. He didn't bite his rescuer. She needed to back off and in an animal way, he told her to. He could have mauled her to death if he wanted. He didn't.

      February 24, 2012 at 2:15 pm | Report abuse |
    • Putthedogdown

      Thank God, someone else in here with common sense. Yes, I agree, the animal is brain damaged, it will do this again to someone and must be put down, you are completely right Vogrog.

      February 24, 2012 at 2:28 pm | Report abuse |
  14. WhiteBoxer

    I don't think it's a mastiff ... I had a white boxer that looked exactly like this dog. Had the same gentle looking demeanor like this dog, but he would wig out when you least expected it. Come to find out, white boxers are known to have all kinds of issues – mental and physical.

    February 24, 2012 at 2:08 pm | Report abuse | Reply
    • Joe T.

      I think the trainer knows what kind of dog it is more than you would.

      February 24, 2012 at 2:17 pm | Report abuse |
  15. nwnjjim

    It's difficult, if not impossible, to expect all humans to stop acting with their normal human instincts around dogs that appear to be within control of their masters. Most of us show affection to calm animals who are with their handlers. The assumption is that they are under control and not a danger. For certain, most of us realize we have to be more cautious because animals are, well, animals. But not all of us. When an animal reacts dangerously to what would be considered by most to be normal non harmful human behavior, it's not hard to figure out where the fault lies. The handler, then the animal, but certainly not the human victim.

    February 24, 2012 at 2:08 pm | Report abuse | Reply
    • charlotte

      You nitwit. You cannot blame the dog and indeed, any adult human being is responsible to behave intelligently around a strange dog. The only victim here is the dog. True, the handler should have told her in advance not to kiss the dog because only an ignorant idiot would do something like that !!!! Here you are, pretending like it's "perfectly normal" to shove your face into that of a huge dog who has never met you. People are idiots – and it isn't only the newswoman, apparently, who qualifies.

      February 24, 2012 at 2:15 pm | Report abuse |
    • lillbit

      So by your definition if a trained lion is 'under the control' of his trainer, it's okay for me to go up and kiss it on the nose and not expect to get bitten/eaten? IT IS AN ANIMAL! As much as we humans think we can control them...THEY ARE ANIMALS!!!

      February 24, 2012 at 2:17 pm | Report abuse |
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