Outbreak of deadly tornadoes tear through U.S.
A car lies overturned in the parking lot of the Henryville school after a tornado ripped through Henryville, Indiana.
March 2nd, 2012
08:36 PM ET

Outbreak of deadly tornadoes tear through U.S.

A powerful storm system rolled across the U.S. Friday causing at slew of tornadoes from Alabama to Indiana. The deadly tornadoes left a devastating path of destruction behind. This is something you'll have to see to believe.

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‘Take it away from us’

A woman near West Liberty, Kentucky can be heard praying on camera as a huge funnel cloud forms over her house.

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'This was time to take shelter'

A WDRB reporter and photographer got caught in the storm as they headed out to cover the severe weather in Indiana.

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‘It’s heartbreaking’

Indiana was among the hardest-hit states.

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Well built homes 'wiped' to the ground

Video captures the heartbreak as tornado survivors try and pick up the pieces from what's left of their homes.

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Filed under: Indiana • Kentucky • Survivor Stories • Tennessee • Tornadoes • U.S. • Weather
March 2nd, 2012
06:42 PM ET

At least 28 deaths blamed on Friday's apparent tornadoes

Editor's note: A devastating storm system moved across the United States on Friday, spawning a slew of tornadoes that contributed to at least 28 fatalities in Indiana, Kentucky and Ohio.

Friday's storms come days after a separate tornado outbreak that left 13 dead across Kansas, Missouri, Illinois and Tennessee and battered parts of Kentucky as well.

[Updated at 11:41 p.m. ET] the death toll from Friday's storms has risen to at least 28, authorities say. The deaths were reported in Indiana, Kentucky and Ohio.

[Updated at 6:42 p.m. ET] A second person has died in Clark County, Indiana, as a result of apparent tornadoes that swept through the area Friday, the county's emergency management director told CNN.

That brings the death toll for the state to five two in Clark County and three in Jefferson County according to state and county officials.

[Updated at 6:14 p.m. ET] At least four people have been killed in Indiana after powerful tornadoes swept through the state Friday, according to state and local officials. Three of the deaths are in Jefferson County and one is in Clark County.

[Updated at 4:02 p.m. ET] Between 40 to 50 homes in Hamilton County, Tennessee, have "significant damage that we know about," the county's Chief of Emergency Management Bill Tittle told CNN on Friday. He said that there are 24 reported injuries and, while none of those appear to be life-threatening, he acknowledged that "we have not reached all the homes."

[Updated at 3:01 p.m. ET] Trained weather spotters reported a tornado at 1:43 p.m. CT (2:43 p.m. ET) in Posey County, Indiana, according to the National Weather Service. It is the third tornado the weather agency has reported on Friday.

[Updated at 2:35 p.m. ET] Severe weather injured at least six people Friday and caused damage near Chattanooga, Tennessee, said Amy Maxwell, a spokeswoman for the Hamilton County Office of Emergency Management.

[Updated at 11:44 a.m. ET] At least 17,000 customers were without power Friday near Huntsville, Alabama, amid reports of a tornado or tornadoes in the area, the Madison County Emergency Management Agency said. Huntsville is in Madison County, which is in far northern Alabama.

[Updated at 11:26 a.m. ET] The National Weather Service issued a tornado emergency for Madison County, Alabama, on Friday morning after saying a large and extremely dangerous tornado caused widespread damage near Meridianville, Alabama.

[Updated at 11:20 a.m. ET] At least one apparent tornado damaged or destroyed several homes Friday morning in Limestone County, Alabama, just west of Huntsville in far northern Alabama, said Cindy Adams of the Limestone County Sheriff's Office.

Touchdowns were reported in the communities of Tanner and East Limestone, she said. One apparent tornado touched down at least once before authorities could sound a warning siren, she said.

[Initial post, 10:55 a.m. ET] An apparent tornado touched down Friday morning near Huntsville, Alabama, authorities said. Officials have reports of houses damaged in Madison County, said Paige Colburn, an emergency management official.

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This Week's Top Videos
March 2nd, 2012
03:09 PM ET

This Week's Top Videos

Editor's Note: This post is a recap of the top five videos on CNN.com from the past week. So in case you didn't catch our best videos during the week, here is your chance to see what you missed.
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Filed under: 2011 tsunami • Academy Awards • Angelina Jolie • Celebrity • Child safety • Crime • Hoax • Japan • Justice • Natural Disasters • Showbiz • Tsunami • Uncategorized • World
Overheard on CNN.com: Romney's gaffes, you say? Try waxing poetic on politics of the day
Mitt Romney campaigns Thursday in Fargo, North Dakota, ahead of the Super Tuesday primaries.
March 2nd, 2012
03:00 PM ET

Overheard on CNN.com: Romney's gaffes, you say? Try waxing poetic on politics of the day

Editor's note: This post is part of the Overheard on CNN.com series, a regular feature that examines interesting comments and thought-provoking conversations posted by the community.

Happy Friday. Some of our commenters have been feeling a bit poetic as they react to a story about Mitt Romney's verbal missteps during the GOP presidential race.

Gaffes keep Romney playing defense

Some readers said they weren't sure the remarks in question were gaffes. Others expressed their support of Romney's past success and present views.

A comment below was written in a sort of poetic verse, prompting others to chime in with replies.

Cali_Mafia:
"Mitt entered the presidential race
Thinking 'Hey, I’ve got a presidential face.'
But try as he may,
People always would say
That his head contained nothing but space."

Guest:
"Mitt created jobs and turned companies around
Successful as a governor and fiscally sound
But liberals won't hear
They plug their ears
And vote for massive debts that run the country to the ground."

Arkady:
"Willard, Willard, what do you say?
What lobby group are you addressing today?
Are you the Lib who once ruled Mass?
Or an Obama hater, tea party and crass?
There's no way of knowing
What real views you're showing
So, personally, I think I'll pass."

Another set of semi-poetic comments also appeared. If you've got some literary aspirations, perhaps you'll want to give it a shot as well. FULL POST

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Filed under: Elections • Overheard on CNN.com • Politics
March 2nd, 2012
02:38 PM ET

Baseball's playoff expansion to start this year

Major League Baseball will expand its playoffs this season from eight teams to 10 by adding an extra wild-card spot to each league, MLB.com reported Friday.

The expansion was agreed to last year in a collective bargaining deal between Major League Baseball and its players' union, but the parties didn't announce until Friday that the change would start with the 2012 season.

In each league, the playoffs will now consist of the three division winners plus two wild cards, which would be top two teams that didn't win a division. A league's two wild cards will play one post-season game against each other, with the winners advancing to their league’s Division Series.

SI: New wildcard format will have its flaws

Although more teams will make the postseason, wild-card teams now face more of a burden. In recent years, each league's wild-card team went straight to a best-of-five Division Series. Now, wild-card clubs have to spend some of their pitchers on an extra game while the division winners rest, MLB.com points out.

"It used to be if a team had the wild card locked up, they could start setting their rotation for the playoffs," Texas Rangers infielder and designated hitter Michael Young said, according to MLB.com. "Now you have to do everything you can to win the division. You're in - you don't have to play a win-or-go-home game."

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Filed under: Baseball • Sports
March 2nd, 2012
02:33 PM ET

What to do in event of tornado watch, warning

Editor's note: The following is advice from CNN Meteorologist Sean Morris on steps you can take when a tornado watch or a tornado warning is issued in your area.

A tornado watch means that tornadoes, high winds, and hail are possible in the watch area.

When a watch is issued in your area, keep abreast of the latest information by monitoring television, radio, and NOAA weather radio. A NOAA weather radio is a must, especially for storms that may occur overnight, when you may not be monitoring television or radio. Know the name of the county or parish in which you live and keep road maps handy to assist in tracking the storms.

Tornado warnings mean that a tornado has been spotted, or that radar has indicated that one exists. When a warning is issued in your area:

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Filed under: Tornadoes • Weather
Romney, Santorum: Their war of words with themselves
On the campaign trail, Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum have both made comments providing a field day for their critics.
March 2nd, 2012
12:57 PM ET

Romney, Santorum: Their war of words with themselves

Both Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum have suffered self-inflicted wounds while campaigning for the Republican presidential nomination.

For Romney, it has been comments that play into the stereotype he’s an elitist, out of touch with the common Joe, or not a committed conservative.

For Santorum, his long-held, far-right positions on social issues may make it difficult for him to sway independents and disaffected Democrats that he would need to win the general election.

Here’s a look at their greatest, er, hits:

Romney: ‘I have some great friends who are NASCAR team owners’

During a stop at the Daytona 500, Romney was asked if he was a fan of the popular sport. Romney told an Associated Press sports reporter that he was kind of “but I have some great friends who are NASCAR team owners.”

Romney: ‘A couple of Cadillacs’

During a speech in the nation’s automotive capital before the Michigan primary, Romney casually told the Detroit Economic Club that he drove a Mustang and a Chevrolet pickup and his wife, Ann, drove “a couple of Cadillacs” (one at each of their two homes) as he tried to show his family’s commitment to buying American cars.

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Filed under: Elections • Mitt Romney • Politics • Rick Santorum
Behind the scenes at Iditarod 2011
Angie Taggart participated in her first Iditarod race in 2011.
March 2nd, 2012
12:05 PM ET

Behind the scenes at Iditarod 2011

In 2011, CNN.com went on a never-before-seen journey through Alaska during the Iditarod.  A rookie Iditarod racer, 36-year-old teacher Angie Taggart, agreed to strap Go-Pro cameras to her sled and forehead and record her two weeks on the trail.

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Rookie cries at Iditarod start

After training herself and her dogs for years, Angie had a jittery start, filled with anxiety and tears for the 1,150 miles that lay ahead of her.

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Rookie crashes on Iditarod trail

Angie had to quickly get get her bearings, because she soon faced the biggest challenge of the race, the infamous Dalzell Gorge, where the trail drops hundreds of feet in only two miles.

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Dogs slip on icy Iditarod trail

The weather was always a concern for Angie, so when she and her dogs faced thick sheets of ice from one side of the trail to the other, she was unsure if she could get them across.

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Iditarod rookie takes wrong turn

Nearing the finish, Angie and her dogs got bad directions and ended up going the wrong way.

Taggart is not racing in this year’s Iditarod, but she’s spent the past year raising and training her dogs to race on Jan Steve’s team.  Taggart will be helping out on the trail, at checkpoints Nikolai and Nome. She said that nine of her 12 dogs will be in the race this year. And next year? "Who knows," she told CNN. "Maybe next year I will mush under that arch once again." You can see more videos from the 2012 race on CNN.com/Video

 


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Filed under: Alaska • Dogs • Sports
Affiliate reports: $16.80 for the Waldorf; school bans hallway talking
The Waldorf Astoria hotel in New York City is cutting quite a deal for two of its former customers.
March 2nd, 2012
10:39 AM ET

Affiliate reports: $16.80 for the Waldorf; school bans hallway talking

A sampling of Friday morning's headlines from some of CNN's affiliates nationwide:

ctnow.com: Waldorf Astoria room at 1952 price for anniversary couple

Sixty years ago, Joan and Isidore Schwartz spent $16.80 for their wedding-night stay at New York City's legendary Waldorf Astoria hotel. Now, for their 60th anniversary, the hotel - whose room prices now start at $319 - is letting them have a suite of rooms for the 1952 price, CNN affiliate ctnow.com reports.

WDRB: School bans talking in hallways

To cut down on opportunities for bullying and fights, a middle school in Louisville, Kentucky, has outlawed talking in the hallways. Students who chat during the few minutes they're given to get from class to class may get detention, CNN affiliate WDRB reports.

WFOR: Worker nails hand to roof

A worker accidentally nailed his left hand to the roof of a home with a nail gun in Coconut Grove, Florida, and rescuers needed 90 minutes to conduct the tricky moves to free him, CNN affiliate WFOR reports.

KPTV: Team triumphs year after wrestler's death

A year after junior wrestler Charley Englefried collapsed and died following a match, his high school team has won an Oregon state wrestling championship, CNN affiliate KPTV reports.


Filed under: U.S.
March 2nd, 2012
07:43 AM ET

Friday's live events

The race to the Republican presidential nomination continues March 6 with Super Tuesday.  CNN.com Live is your home for all the latest news and views from the campaign trail.

Today's programming highlights...

9:00 am ET - Rutgers cyber-bullying trial - The trial of a former Rutgers University student accused of bullying his roommate, who later committed suicide, continues in New Jersey.

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Filed under: Elections • Politics • Republican Party
Gotta Watch: Dr. Seuss turns 108
Author Dr. Seuss, or Theodor Seuss Geisel, sits with a copy of his book, 'The Cat in the Hat' in1957.
March 2nd, 2012
05:47 AM ET

Gotta Watch: Dr. Seuss turns 108

Dr.Seuss was born on March 2, 1904. He gave us stories like "The Lorax," "The Cat in the Hat" and much more. Theodor Seuss Geisel wrote books for all ages, with whimsical characters, rhyming and new phrases. Between a Grinch who stole Christmas, Sneetches and Thneeds, Dr. Seuss had an impact that all generations can see. So whether its "Green Eggs and Ham" or "Horton Hears a Who" we want to wish a very happy 108th birthday to you!

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'The Lorax' leaps to life on big screen

TheTruffula trees come to life and roam free in this sneak peak of ‘The Lorax’ that’s playing in 3D.

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'Suessologist' uncovers lost Seuss books

One man found a collection of Dr. Seuss stories that are new. It’s amazing what a bit of sleuthing can do.

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2004: Dr. Seuss gets Hollywood star

In 2004 you didn’t have to look far. Dr. Seuss finally got his Hollywood star.

You can also check out our education blog to learn about Read Across America Day, which takes place today.

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Filed under: Animals • California • Celebrity • Environment • Gotta Watch • Los Angeles • Showbiz
March 2nd, 2012
03:40 AM ET

Iran votes in first nationwide poll since 2009 anti-regime protests

Iranians headed to the polls Friday in a parliamentary election marking the first nationwide poll since the disputed 2009 vote triggered massive protests.

About 3,400 candidates are vying for 290 seats in the parliamentary election.

Iran faces an escalating international outcry and western sanctions over its nuclear program, prompting leaders to call for a higher voter turnout to establish legitimacy.

In Iran, elections are heralded by the revolutionary regime as a popular demonstration that it enjoys the overwhelming support of the population.

But the poll marks the first time Iranians are voting since allegations of rigging in the 2009 presidential elections triggered mass street demonstrations against the regime.

FULL STORY

Filed under: Politics • World
March 2nd, 2012
03:17 AM ET

Syria "green lights" aid into hard-hit Baba Amr

Aid workers were given the go ahead by President Bashar al-Assad's government to begin evacuating the wounded and delivering supplies Friday to the shattered rebel stronghold in Homs as reports emerged that Syrian forces turned attention to other targets in the city.

Opposition reports of shelling and sniper attacks in Sunni-dominated neighborhoods follow news that Syrian forces seized Baba Amr, a flashpoint in a nearly year-long uprising that has left thousands dead.

The International Committee of the Red Cross and the Syrian Arab Red Crescent have "received the green light" to enter Baba Amr, Carla Haddad Mardini, an ICRC spokeswoman, said.

She predicted the humanitarian aid and evacuation operations would be made more complex because snow was falling in the city.

FULL STORY

Filed under: World
March 2nd, 2012
02:41 AM ET

Judge apologizes for forwarding a racist e-mail aimed at Obama

Montana's chief federal judge has offered his apologies for forwarding a racist e-mail aimed at President Barack Obama. The judge also initiated a judicial misconduct investigation against himself.

Liberal advocacy groups demanded that U.S. District Judge Richard Cebull resign.

Cebull, in an interview Wednesday with the Billings Gazette newspaper, offered his regrets for forwarding the e-mail, saying it was "a hard lesson to learn."

"To say it's inappropriate and stupid is an extreme understatement," Cebull said in courthouse chambers on Wednesday, according to the newspaper. "There is no doubt it's racist. It wasn't forwarded for that purpose. If anything, it was political."

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Filed under: Politics • U.S.
March 2nd, 2012
01:45 AM ET

Sandusky federal probe may have different focus

It's fairly clear the federal investigation into Penn State University won't be a duplication of the grand jury probe that led to charges of more than 50 counts of child sex abuse against Jerry Sandusky.

Instead, federal authorities seem to be stepping into areas where the state attorney general's office hasn't gone.

This time, they seem to be exploring the possibility of a cover-up at Penn State, as well as possible bribes, fraud, or misuse of federal money, according to three former federal prosecutors asked to independently review the subpoena Penn State received February 2.

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Filed under: Crime • U.S.
March 2nd, 2012
01:27 AM ET

2 more bodies found after Coast Guard helicopter crash

The U.S. Coast Guard on Thursday found an additional two bodies of crew members missing after a helicopter crash in Alabama's Mobile Bay.

Rescuers have now found a total three bodies from the Tuesday crash, and have suspended the extensive search even though one other person was still missing, the Coast Guard said.

The helicopter, an MH-65C, crashed Tuesday night while on a mission from the Aviation Training Center at Mobile Regional Airport, a statement from the Coast Guard said.

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Filed under: U.S.