April 27th, 2012
06:25 PM ET

Overheard on CNN.com: How should we handle widows, daughters of bin Laden?

Editor's note: This post is part of the Overheard on CNN.com series, a regular feature that examines interesting comments and thought-provoking conversations posted by the community.

Fourteen members of Osama bin Laden's family were deported to Saudi Arabia from Pakistan on Friday, less than a week ahead of the first anniversary of his death at the hands of U.S. commandos. Our readers are debating whether this was the appropriate action, and whether those associated with bin Laden should be adversely affected in turn.

Deported bin Laden widows, daughters go to Saudi Arabia

Some said they felt the bin Laden family is being treated too kindly. This was the most-liked comment.

cooldude2011: "The article says bin Laden and family lived in Pakistan for eight years with the help of Pakistanis who arranged 'everything' for them. Pakistan provides an 'all-inclusive' resort-like package deal to all kinds of terrorists as long as they pay them."

Then there were those who said others should not pay a price for bin Laden's issues.

Bobby62: "So what? These women are not responsible for bin Laden's actions. Being married to him was a big enough punishment as far as I am concerned."

But then, there are different definitions of punishment.

1Courageous: "Wives and daughters got deported from Pakistan? Can someone explain to me how this is a punishment?"

Some compared the issue to illegal immigration, like in this comment from one reader.

"They were deported from Pakistan because they were living there illegally. Many persons in our world live illegally in various countries. That does not make them bad people or terrorists. Wishing them a good future as there is no proof of serious wrongdoing especially when it come to the kids."

What's your take on this issue? Share your opinion in the comments area below and in the latest stories on CNN.com. Or sound off on video via CNN iReport.

Compiled by the CNN.com moderation staff. Some comments edited for length or clarity.

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Filed under: Overheard on CNN.com • Pakistan • Saudi Arabia • World
soundoff (57 Responses)
  1. Philip

    Tired of the same old stories? Well, I'm just putting the finishing touches on my next one. It's the story of a Jewish family who declared their valuables at the German border, got-in with a dozen ship convoy headed for the USA, and were rejected assylum. Not one country would allow them in. My story is what happened to this family when they were forced to return to Nazi Germany, feeling of being rejected by the entire world of mankind in tow. Look for it on the blahgs 'bout Saturday morning next. :) It's a real tear-jerker slash eye opener.

    April 27, 2012 at 9:43 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  2. wOT

    Leave those people along, they are not Americans! Take care of the people in our own country!

    April 27, 2012 at 9:46 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  3. Ripley, believe it! Or dont!

    Philip, have you ever thought of really writing a book?

    April 27, 2012 at 10:06 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  4. "Joah Gershom Digs" (sneek peek)

    "I'm fairly certain they [wife and teenage son] were placed on the train headed for Bayer AG's corporate camp. The healthier of us men were placed on different trains once we arrived at the Fatherland Security Camp. I was first sent to Pinamunde where I dug for about a year before being placed on another train bound for Nordhausen.
    I'll never forget the looks on the faces of those left behind for the incinerators. They were hollow, already lifeless stares. Bodies filled with voids where human compassion had been. I recall those same looks from people standing on the docks as our ships headed back for Germany, as our requsts for assylum were rejected in one country after another.
    As the train rambled along, loud explosions could be heard coming from Pinamunde...Allied Forces had discovered the underground secret weapons facilities and were levelling the entire city. But by that time, most of the operation had already been moved to Nordhausen, where I was...:) Rate this as if FB. ty

    April 27, 2012 at 10:14 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  5. @Ripley

    Yes. I had been writing a book about a little boy from Collbran Colorado who had patterened his life his life after a story his grandpa used to tell him over and over and over again. But his grandpa died when he was almost 5, so this is all he remembers:
    Tom Twist was a wonderful fellow
    He was so nimble and strong
    He could turn 10 somersaults backwards!
    And stand on his head all day long!
    His muscles were all girdaperchy...

    Tom Twist goes on to travel the world and have many adventures. Working alongside Chinamen pulling huge ships up the Yellow River even.
    Anyway, other than that, no. And i'm not writing any more of that one either. Writing is too hard, errr, painful.

    April 27, 2012 at 10:30 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  6. @Ripley

    *that one. It got really wierd. I did WAY too much research over WAY too many years and found-out too much to even put in a book. My own childhood...it was as I remembered, and ohhhhhhh so much more. And plus I would never change the names to protect the guilty, all of us being guilty, some of us never caught nor disciplined. The book would have literally killed my own mother, had at least one of my brothers seeking to kill ME, my sisters moving further away than Seattle and Boston (not counting MY sister Donna, who hooked-up with a saudi prince in college and was never heard from again) and my entire extended family having proof of just why I am the middle child. Because I CAN! But I don't have to be. Writing either. (thx 4 asking Ripley. Who are you?

    April 27, 2012 at 10:46 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  7. Ripley, believe it! Or dont!

    You know who I am

    April 28, 2012 at 12:39 am | Report abuse | Reply
  8. claudia

    You guys are freaky

    April 28, 2012 at 12:47 am | Report abuse | Reply
  9. nausia

    clodia

    April 28, 2012 at 1:11 am | Report abuse | Reply
  10. ron

    How should "we" handle them? I would reccomend rubber gloves...

    April 28, 2012 at 5:46 am | Report abuse | Reply
  11. ronvan

    WHY, should WE handle them at all? What a bunch of BULL!

    April 28, 2012 at 8:15 am | Report abuse | Reply
  12. just saying

    When you handle the husband, you handle the wife and kids too. Unless you are ignorant, of course. And then in your sick little pea brain you can keep everything in seperate little boxes.

    April 28, 2012 at 8:35 am | Report abuse | Reply
  13. saywhat

    What's there to debate/
    Let these women in peace. Or do we want them handed over to us and carted away to Gitmo for some water boarding?
    For chrissake.

    April 28, 2012 at 10:57 am | Report abuse | Reply
  14. krm1007

    Not sure what the point is. A lot of terrorists (depending on whose perspective) have been or are residing in USA, Europe, South America, Middle East, India etc are iving in spa like resorts with billions in the banks. Go figure !!!!

    April 28, 2012 at 2:57 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  15. Philip

    @saywhat. Of course I wasn't seriously wanting these or any women "waterboarded", put through the same routine as male prisoners of War on Terror. Sheesh. Hitler's wife would of been given a free pass too had she not committed suicde, if in fact that's what happened. Clepatra? Well, she is a bit Joan of Arcy for this illustration. Lets stick to Barbara Bush and xanax. he he :)

    April 28, 2012 at 4:17 pm | Report abuse | Reply
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