Ahead of the curve: The next 7 days
June 24th, 2012
02:56 PM ET

Ahead of the curve: The next 7 days

Here is a look at some of the stories that CNN plans to follow this week:

Supreme Court rulings on two hot-button laws

The high court is expected to rule this week on Arizona's controversial legislation on immigration and possibly on the federal health-care reform law that is the signature legislation of President Barack Obama's term in office.

The Arizona ruling could have widespread implications for other states with similar laws. At issue is whether states have any authority to step in to regulate immigration matters or whether that is the exclusive role of the federal government. In dry legal terms, this constitutional issue is known as pre-emption.

Several other states followed Arizona's lead by passing laws meant to deter illegal immigrants. Similar laws are under challenge in lower courts in Georgia, Alabama, Utah, Indiana and South Carolina. Arizona's appeal is the first to reach the Supreme Court.

The four provisions of the Arizona law that are on hold pending the decision are:

– A requirement that local police officers check a person's immigration status while enforcing other laws if "reasonable suspicion" exists that the person is in the United States illegally.

– A provision authorizing police to arrest immigrants without warrant where "probable cause" exists that they committed any public offense making them removable from the country.

– A section making it a state crime for "unauthorized immigrants" to fail to carry registration papers and other government identification.

– A ban forbidding those not authorized for employment in the United States to apply, solicit or perform work. That would include immigrants standing in a parking lot who "gesture or nod" their willingness to be employed.

Law leaves divisive legacy

The justices are also weighing the constitutionality of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, the health-insurance law Democrats had dreamed of for generations until a compromise version finally signed into law  in 2010.

The  key issues in that case:

– Does the law overstep federal authority, particularly with the "individual mandate" that requires nearly everyone to obtain health insurance or pay a penalty?

– Must the entire act be scrapped if that key provision is unconstitutional?

– Are the lawsuits brought by the states and other petitioners barred under the Anti-Injunction Act and must they wait until the law goes into effect?

– Are states being "coerced" by the federal government to expand their share of Medicaid costs and administration, with the risk of losing that funding if they refuse?

The rulings could come on Monday or Thursday.

London poetry drop

It's dubbed the "Rain of Poems" and organizers vow it will be "one of the most visually stunning displays of aeronautical poetry ever seen."

At sunset on Tuesday, 100,000 poems from more than 300 artists in 203 countries will be dropped on bookmarks over London's Jubilee Gardens as part of the Poetry Parnassus, a festival being in conducted as part of the buildup to the Summer Olympic Games.

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Dude, where's my president?
Cairo's Tahrir Square was flooded with people anxiously waiting for election results on Sunday.
June 24th, 2012
11:12 AM ET

Dude, where's my president?

Around the world Sunday, people waited anxiously for the results of Egypt's groundbreaking presidential election.

And the payoff was a long time coming - especially when Egypt's election commission began its announcement of the results, but took an hour to get around to telling who had won. That prompted the Twittersphere to poke some fun at the long, long announcement.

Here's a sampling of some of the things people were tweeting:

Are you there? Share your images.

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Filed under: Egypt • World