August 1st, 2012
12:10 PM ET

More than half of U.S. counties now disaster zones due to drought, officials say

More than half of all U.S. counties have been designated disaster zones, the Department of Agriculture reported Wednesday, blaming excessive heat and a devastating drought that's spread across the Corn Belt and is contributing to rising food prices.

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack on Wednesday declared disaster zone designations for an additional 218 counties in 12 states because of damage and losses caused by drought and excessive heat.

The states are Arkansas, Georgia, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Mississippi, Nebraska, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Tennessee and Wyoming.

Nearly three-quarters of the nation's cattle acreage is inside a region hit by drought, as is about two-thirds of the country's hay acreage, the agency reported.

USDA researchers added that an average of 37% of the nation's soybeans were last week ranked from very poor to poor, the lowest quality recorded since a massive drought in 1988.

More on the drought

Food prices climbing

Corn prices hit record as crops shrivel

Opinion: Extreme weather and a changing climate

FULL STORY
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Filed under: U.S. • Weather
soundoff (66 Responses)
  1. uhoh

    And these same people who yelled about TARP and bailouts are getting ready to get in line for federal aid...funny how when it is about them, the tone changes...

    August 2, 2012 at 1:29 pm | Report abuse |
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