Algeria hostage takers demand passage to Libya
January 17th, 2013
06:38 AM ET

Algeria hostage takers demand passage to Libya

Islamist militants who seized Westerners at an Algerian gas plant are demanding a safe passage to nearby Libya, authorities said, as fallout from the French offensive in Mali reverberates globally.

Media in the region reported that the attackers issued a news release demanding an end to "brutal aggression on our people in Mali" and cited "blatant intervention of the French crusader forces in Mali."

In the news release, the militants said they carried out the operation in Algeria because it allowed French forces to use its air space in attacking Islamist militants in Mali.

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soundoff (10 Responses)
  1. Joey Isotta-Fraschini ©™

    The Islamist militants must expect a good reception in Libya, if they want to go there.
    The USA was active in removing Libya's former leaders. Did the USA have inadequate information concerning what wound probably happen under the present government of Libya?
    This reminds me of my negative reaction to the removal of the Shah in Iran: look at our relationship to Iran today.
    I do not think that all revolutionary change is necessarily good.

    January 17, 2013 at 8:24 am | Report abuse | Reply
    • Portland tony

      The US installed the Shah as the Iranian military dictator as part of our foreign policy at the time. In retrospect, it was a very bad move. We propped him up, gave him arms, and hoped we could keep Iran as a cold war adversary to the Soviet Union as well as a source of cheap oil. Well the whole episode just bit us in the a ss.

      January 17, 2013 at 9:18 am | Report abuse |
  2. the prophet

    The US is not the police of world...it is however the must uneducated society in the world

    January 17, 2013 at 9:26 am | Report abuse | Reply
    • Joey Isotta-Fraschini ©™

      @ the prophet:
      I would agree with your post to the extent that most USA citizens are far less educated than the average European citizen, but I could not agree that we are "the most uneducated society in the world."

      January 17, 2013 at 9:48 am | Report abuse |
  3. Joey Isotta-Fraschini ©™

    Obviously, @ Portland tony and I see the issue of Iran from different points of view.
    I know wonderful people from that country who call it "Persia," will not say "Iran," and say, "the Shah was the best."
    I have met members of the Shah's family, and they were fine human beings.
    There are vast differences of opinion in the USA: see "Democrats" and "Republicans."

    January 17, 2013 at 9:36 am | Report abuse | Reply
  4. saywhat

    Good morning all.
    When a western power invades a foreign land not even on its own continent or even remotely posing a military threat to them, a reaction manifest in such incidents is inevitable.

    January 17, 2013 at 11:59 am | Report abuse | Reply
  5. saywhat

    On Iran.
    The way this nation is willing to be led by its proverbial nose thru propaganda & Americans own ignorance becomes painfully visible if you all read "Iran". An article by West Point graduate, US army vet, film maker, writer & president /ceo of Americana Films Merlin Miller.

    January 17, 2013 at 12:06 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  6. saywhat

    Miller spent some time in Iran recently when attending Int.Independent Film makers festival. This article can be found on the web.

    January 17, 2013 at 12:08 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  7. saywhat

    @Portland tony
    That is correct we derailed democracy in Iran by toppling Mussadaq's elected govt & installing Shah, one of the worst dictators to ever rule in that region. hat was a folly.

    January 17, 2013 at 12:11 pm | Report abuse | Reply
  8. the prophet

    @JIF i am a sovereign revolutionary don't believe in statics a corrupt Government puts out, i don't in any form Government all Governments are corrupt including the US and poor Countries the worst

    January 17, 2013 at 2:52 pm | Report abuse | Reply

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