July 1st, 2013
11:42 PM ET

Snowden rips Obama administration

The anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks says it has submitted asylum requests to 19 more countries for Edward Snowden, the ex-National Security Agency computer contractor who has admitted leaking details of U.S. surveillance programs to reporters.

The countries include Russia, where Snowden has been holed up at Moscow's Sheremetyevo International Airport since June 23. The rest are scattered from South America to several European Union countries, India and China.

"The documents outline the risks of persecution Mr. Snowden faces in the United States and have started to be delivered by the Russian consulate to the relevant embassies in Moscow," WikiLeaks, which has been assisting Snowden's effort to find a haven from U.S. espionage charges, said in a statement issued early Tuesday.

FULL STORY

Filed under: Uncategorized
July 1st, 2013
11:41 PM ET

Loss of 19 firefighters 'unbearable'

They were part of an elite squad confronting wildfires on the front line, setting up barriers to stop the spreading destruction. But in their unpredictable world, it doesn't take much to turn a situation deadly.

In this case, a wind shift and other factors caused a central Arizona fire, which now spans 8,400 acres, to become erratic, said Mike Reichling, Arizona State Forestry Division spokesman.

Though the deaths are under investigation, the inferno appears to have proved too much, even for the shelters the 19 firefighters carried as a last-ditch survival tool.

"The fuels were very dry, the relative humidity was low, the wind was coming out of the south. It turned around on us because of monsoon action," Reichling told CNN affiliate KNXV. "That's what caused the deaths.

FULL STORY

Filed under: Arizona
July 1st, 2013
11:39 PM ET

Egypt's military gives Morsy ultimatum

Just don't call it a coup.

Appearing to throw its weight behind an opposition that swarmed Cairo's Tahrir Square, the Egyptian military told the country's civilian government it has until Wednesday evening to "meet the demands of the people" or it will step in to restore order. In a statement carried nationwide on radio and television, the military called the 48-hour ultimatum "a final chance to shoulder the burden of a historic moment in our country."

But a military spokesman said late Monday that the culture of the armed forces - which dominated the country for decades - "doesn't allow it to adopt the policy of military coups." The statement was meant to push all factions toward quick solutions and a national consensus, and the armed forces aren't looking to be part of the political or ruling circles, the spokesman, Col. Ahmed Ali, said in written statement.

FULL STORY

Filed under: Egypt