September 26th, 2012
08:16 PM ET

We asked, you answered: Are we really ready to take a look at 'real women'?

There is arguably not much shock value left in Lady Gaga’s out-there and often barely there wardrobe choices. But when the superstar singer decided to bare it all this week showing nothing but a simple bikini, her bod and a few extra pounds, the world stopped to stare – and comment - once again.

Gaga, admitting a longtime struggle with bulimia, proclaimed on her blog that she was embracing her new curves and urged her “little monsters” to do the same.

Photos: Gaga's new curves and most memorable looks

Meanwhile, fashion designer Ralph Lauren made headlines of its own by hiring Australian plus-size model Robyn Lawley. Lawley stands 6-foot-2 and wears a size 12.

The intense focus on fuller figures prompted Lesley Kinzel, associate editor at xoJane.com and the author of "Two Whole Cakes: How to Stop Dieting and Learn to Love Your Body" to write a piece for CNN.com asking our audience "Are we really ready to take a look at 'real women'?"

The CNN community responded to the question in droves. Check out our roundup of conversations about body image happening on CNN.com.

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Filed under: Advertising • Comments • Gender • Overheard on CNN.com
Comments: Have you experienced Warhol's iconic '15 minutes' of fame?
The Campbell Soup Company celebrates the 50th anniversary of Andy Warhol's soup can series with special edition labels.
September 5th, 2012
04:15 PM ET

Comments: Have you experienced Warhol's iconic '15 minutes' of fame?

Editor's note: We're listening to you. Every day, we spot thought-provoking comments from readers. Here's some comments we noticed today.

Andy Warhol once said that "in the future, everybody will be famous for 15 minutes." He's been dead for 25 years, but he's still got his fame. This week, 1.2 million limited-edition cans of condensed tomato soup with Pop-art-inspired labels go on sale to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Warhol's famed art piece "32 Campbell's Soup Cans."

Readers shared their thoughts on the artist's style and got us thinking about our own fleeting moments in the limelight.

Andy Warhol's '15 minutes' of fame are not up yet

One reader described her Warhol-esque decor.

AndreaMilnes: "I love Warhol, and really pop art in general. You should see my apartment, it's a minor explosion of modernism and it happens to feature the Warhol Wall. Fittingly above my TV I have four tinted photos of him, each with a quote, and I freakin love it. The quotes aren't particularly deep (ex: "everybody must have a fantasy") but then I'm not particularly deep either. It's part of the reason I love his work, you don't have to be 6ft up your own rear and up to your eyeballs in meaning to be interesting and produce great art. Art is awesome when it's done merely for the sake of itself. Add in the pop cultural and fashion aspects of Warhol, and it's a recipe for my adoration. So please believe I'll be eating lots of soup for a while, lol!"

Others took a different view.

norcalmojo: "Warhol was the Sid Vicious of the art world. He knew his art was commercial junk and also knew that people would buy anything if they were told it was cool. It was a joke on his own fans. At least Pistols' fans were in on the joke. Warhol fans are still convinced they're sophisticated."

One commenter described the story of Billy Name, a photographer who knew Warhol at the time the artist survived being shot. He described Name's apartment as a "mini Warhol gallery." FULL POST

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Filed under: Advertising • Art • Comments
July 24th, 2012
08:20 PM ET

Overheard on CNN.com: One-eyed Olympics mascots 'creepy,' but giant mouse OK?

Editor's note: This post is part of the Overheard on CNN.com series, a regular feature that examines interesting comments and thought-provoking conversations posted by the community.

The run-up to the London Olympics has had its share of moments by far, but one of the most unusual things about 2012 is the pair of one-eyed um, creatures, known as Wenlock and Mandeville. As the story goes, they were created out of magical droplets of steel left over from the Olympic Stadium. CNN.com presented a quiz of other odd or controversial mascots throughout the years, but readers had plenty of interesting ways of describing the monocular duo.

Olympic mascots: Cute or creepy?

Too sci-fi for the Olympiad?

Wastrel Way: "If these things had been in a '50's horror movie it would now be considered a classic."

Oh, snap.

tradster: "Creepy mascots and that Olympic tower is an eyesore. Leave it to British to make the Olympics a platform for their eccentricity. I say draw in two eyes and call that one eye a nose, and voila, you've got Snoopy."

But talking rodents are another thing altogether.

nonamevot3r: "Not Creepy, unusual, and why is a six-foot talking rat (Mickey Mouse) not creepy? It was a nice idea to anthropomorphize something other than an animal for a change; two blobs of steel left over from the building of the stadium trying to join up with their friends at the stadium seems to be a very sensible idea. We were promised a number of short films of their travels around the country to get to Stratford in time for the Olympics; it is shame that these don't seem to have made it onto the TV apart from in a negative sense. Go Wenlock, go Manderville."

If you're going to be in London, be sure to share the sights and sounds of the Olympics on CNN iReport. But these folks say they can't bear to watch the games unfold. FULL POST

July 19th, 2012
09:09 AM ET

Is Greenpeace's prank on Shell oil a 'scam'?

By Thom Patterson, CNN

(CNN) - If there's an official ranking for snarkiness, Greenpeace and the Yes Lab have got to be near the top this summer. Their snarky social media mash-up takes Greenpeace's campaign against Shell Arctic drilling to a whole new level.

It's a fake Shell website that encourages supporters to create ads that mock Shell's offshore drilling effort and to sign an anti-drilling petition.

Greenpeace teamed up with Yes Lab in June to create the fake website.

No matter which side you favor regarding offshore Alaska oil drilling, watching this fight is just plain fascinating.  Just make sure you get out of the way when the fur starts flying.

The Greenpeace/Yes Lab social media campaign clearly points to a strategy to succeed in a cacophonous Internet where it's increasingly harder to be heard and credibility is often called into question.

Although Shell is none too happy, calling the campaign a "scam," Greenpeace says it has received no legal action from Shell nor threats of legal action.

Here's a sample of these mocking fake Shell ads:

FULL POST

Massive bather makes splash in German lake
A massive sculpture of a bathing woman will spend 10 days in a Hamburg, Germany, lake.
August 5th, 2011
10:02 AM ET

Massive bather makes splash in German lake

Call it "The Bath of the 70-foot Woman." Or "Two Tons of Mermaid."

The real name of the massive woman in a Hamburg, Germany, lake is actually "Die Badende" ("The Bather"), and she's an ad for British beauty brand Soap & Glory.

"We launched Soap & Glory in Germany last year, and we've been looking for a way to say, 'Thank you!' to everyone for embracing our products, and making us a real success there. At Soap & Glory, we consider it our calling to bring more beauty to the world, and have fun doing it 'Die Badende' does exactly that," the brand's founder, Marcia Kilgore, said in a news release.

"Die Badende" is the work of art creator Oliver Voss. It's almost 13 feet high, 67 feet long and weighs two tons.

The sculpture is made from a steel cage covered with Styrofoam almost a foot thick, which is then covered by a layer of special filler sealed with a polyester resin.

It will spend 10 days in Hamburg's Inner Alster Lake.

Apparently, "Die Badende" is as modest as "she" is massive. Soap & Glory promises a crane will be standing by with a supersize towel when "Die Badende" is ready to come out of the water.

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Filed under: Advertising • Art • Germany