Gotta Watch: Amazing flood rescues
A girl swims to a nearby tree to wait to be rescued from rising floodwaters.
May 9th, 2011
11:11 AM ET

Gotta Watch: Amazing flood rescues

Inevitably there will be swollen rivers that catch people before they can escape and, each year, brave rescuers wade into rising waters to help others to safety. In light of the extreme flooding of the mighty Mississippi, we've highlighted some of the most courageous rescues from past flooding episodes.

Teen clings to tree in swollen river – This video shows the harrowing rescue of Raquel Dawson, a teenager who had decided to walk to work and was caught in a flash flood in Oklahoma City. For more, you can watch a full interview with the teen here.

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Gotta Watch: Dogs of war
Jacko is honored for his military service.
May 6th, 2011
11:43 AM ET

Gotta Watch: Dogs of war

The recent mission to capture and kill Osama bin Laden has only underscored the need for military canine units. It was recently revealed that part of the SEAL team included a dog , who was choppered in to help identify possible threats to his team. These videos highlight stories of heroic military dogs during times of peace and war.

Deployed canines honored - A dog who survives six IED explosions surely deserves a war monument. Jacko is just one of many dogs to be honored at the F. Walton working dog memorial.

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Filed under: Animals • Dogs • Gotta Watch • Military • TV-American Morning • Uncategorized • Veterans
Gotta Watch: 'Birthers' here to stay
Donald Trump disputes the existence of a CNN poll with John King.
April 28th, 2011
11:40 AM ET

Gotta Watch: 'Birthers' here to stay

Even as the president jokingly proclaimed he was carrying an ID to prove his citizenship, it seems the "birther" movement just won't let up. These are the latest fiery interviews that seem to be fueling the movement.

'Blowhard and a phony' – Those are some strong words for Donald Trump from New York Times journalist Christopher Byron. Last night,  Trump continued to question President Obama while sparring with CNN's John King . This is Byron's fierce analysis of the feud.

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Gotta Watch: Donald Trump
Several polls have Donald Trump as a top condender for the GOP race to the White House.
April 21st, 2011
12:13 PM ET

Gotta Watch: Donald Trump

As MSNBC has said, Donald Trump is to politics what Charlie Sheen is to entertainment. You want to watch him just to see what he says next. He keeps questioning President Obama's birthplace, but he gets annoyed when anyone presses him on his "birther" theory. Trump has been a media magnet for years, and now he's dangling the prospect of a potential presidential run. In today's Gotta Watch, we take a look at some of Trump's greatest hits.

'Birther' controversy – Trump says his strengths as a potential candidate like in his stance on "jobs, the economy, and protecting our nation from OPEC, China and all these other countries that are ripping us off." And yet, he complains that, every time he's on TV, he's asked about the theory that President Obama wasn't born in the U.S. Check out this feisty exchange between Trump and CNN's Ali Velshi and Kyran Chetry.

What's in a Trump name? – From "stupid" to "blatherside," so many in the media have their own way to describe Donald Trump. CNN's Jeanne Moos takes a look.

Donald Trump said what?? - Sometimes it seems as though Trump says anything that comes to his mind. And it's not always nice. As he eyes a possible presidential run, CNN.com dug up some of the more zany things the mogul has said over the years.

Gloria Borger: Is Donald Trump bankrupting the GOP?

McCain wants U.S. to go after Gadhafi
March 29th, 2011
10:42 AM ET

McCain wants U.S. to go after Gadhafi

President Obama addressed the nation Monday about the United States' involvement in Libya, and he said the goal there is regime change without direct U.S. military force.

Sen. John McCain, R-Arizona, ranking member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, criticized the president's statement and says the use of military force to take the leader out of power shouldn't be taken off the table. He speaks to Christine Romans about Obama's address:

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Filed under: Libya • Politics • TV-American Morning
February 25th, 2011
08:32 AM ET

American who fled Libya: "It was like a tsunami hit Tripoli"

Americans are fleeing Libya as unrest in the country continues. CNN's T.J. Holmes speaks to George Sayar and Cyrus Sany, who just returned to the United States from Libya.

The men described a chaotic scene. "Me and my colleague finally made it out after three hours of kicking and shoving and kicking," Sayar says. Sany described taking six hours to get from the parking lot to the airport ticket counter.


Filed under: Libya • TV-American Morning
Kristof: Bahrain regime has 'backed off'
Anti-government protesters in Bahrain gather in the capital city of Manama on Wednesday afetr the deaths of two protesters in clashes with police.
February 16th, 2011
01:19 PM ET

Kristof: Bahrain regime has 'backed off'

Thousands of people had gathered Wednesday for a peaceful funeral procession for a Bahraini man killed when clashes erupted during another protester's funeral procession, the president of a human rights group said. Bahrain's Interior Ministry said those involved in the deaths of two people during recent protests are in custody.

New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof told "American Morning" that the protesters' demands are changing.

Initially, protesters in Bahrain talked about wanting more democracy and to have political prisoners released, Kristof told T.J. Homes. Increasingly, protesters are calling for the overthrow of the ruling family and the conversion of Bahrain into a constitutional monarchy in which the king would reign, but not rule, Kristof said.

“They were really outraged at the government's brutality toward the peaceful protests earlier in the week. And at those two deaths,” he says.

There is some uncertainty about where protests will go later today, Kristof said.

“Now that the regime has backed off, it's a little hard to say where things will go,” he said. "It is possible that similar concessions will win the day. And that there will be some kind of a truce and agreement to have more democracy, some more concessions. And then people will go home. It's just very hard to predict.”


Filed under: Protest • TV-American Morning
One dead, five missing in Pennsylvania gas explosion
February 10th, 2011
10:10 AM ET

One dead, five missing in Pennsylvania gas explosion

At least one person is dead and five are missing after an explosion leveled several homes in Allentown, Pennsylvania, authorities said early Thursday morning.

Robert Scheirer, Allentown's fire chief, told American Morning’s Kiran Chetry that the fire is out, and gas lines in the area have been turned off. He said emergency responders consider this a recovery at this point.

“We believe it to be a natural gas explosion,” he told Chetry. “We don’t know if the leak was inside the home or out on the street. That all has to be investigated.”

Scheirer also said about 500 people from Gross Towers were evacuated and taken to shelters in the city.

FULL STORY

Filed under: TV-American Morning
OK to remove fewer lymph nodes, breast cancer study finds
Mastectomy patients need not lose all their nearby lymph nodes, a new study suggests.
February 9th, 2011
12:30 PM ET

OK to remove fewer lymph nodes, breast cancer study finds

Breast cancer affects one out of every eight women in the United States. If it hasn't touched your family or friends, it could. This morning, there's new information that many of the women affected might not have needed painful, unnecessary surgery to remove the entirety of a patient's lymph nodes.

American Morning's Kiran Chetry spoke with Dr. Monica Morrow, a surgical oncologist with Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and the author of this new study in the "Journal of the American Medical Association." Morrow explains why this is good news for women.


Filed under: Health • TV-American Morning
Debunking sports myths
Many myths surround sports, including the most hyped event of them all, the Super Bowl.
February 4th, 2011
10:58 AM ET

Debunking sports myths

Two childhood friends who love football, one an award-winning sportswriter, the other a finance geek, have the answers that just might help you win your Super Bowl bet.

Jon Wertheim, senior writer at Sports Illustrated, and Tobias Moskowitz, University of Chicago finance professor, are co-authors of Scorecasting: The Hidden Influences Behind How Sports Are Played And Games Are Won, which takes a Freakonomics-type approach to the science of winning games. The book answers questions like, does the hometown team really have an advantage? And, how much do fans make a difference?

From Arlington, Texas, Wertheim and Moskowitz tell American Morning’s T.J. Holmes how their research can be applied to predicting the Super Bowl winner.

So which team will it be–Packers or Steelers– for Super Bowl XLV?


Filed under: Football • Pro football • Sports • TV-American Morning
Pushing out Mubarak
Soldiers and barbed wire keep a crowd back on Friday at Cairo's Tahrir Square.
February 4th, 2011
09:45 AM ET

Pushing out Mubarak

Today on American Morning, Kiran Chetry talks with James Rubin, former U.S. assistant secretary of state and current executive editor of the The Bloomberg View. Rubin's wife is ABC News' Christiane Amanpour, whose car was attacked while reporting in Egypt.

Rubin says Mubarak's tactics to attack protesters and round up journalists were not successful. Protesters today show that this "really is the end for Mubarak," Rubin tells Chetry.


Filed under: Egypt • TV-American Morning
Egypt’s influence on the Middle East
Jordan's King Abdullah II, left, shakes hands with Hamzi Mansour, leader of Jordan's Islamic Action Front, Thursday in Amman.
February 4th, 2011
09:06 AM ET

Egypt’s influence on the Middle East

Countries across the Middle East are watching the chaotic unrest in the streets of Egypt and recent demonstrations in Tunisia with a close eye.

In Jordan, King Abdullah II sacked his government, named a new prime minister and met privately with leaders of the nation's main Islamist group in response to anti-government protests there. The Islamic Action Front, the political wing of Jordan's Muslim Brotherhood, planned another round of demonstrations Friday. On today’s American Morning, Salameh Nematt, Jordanian political analyst and international writer for the Daily Beast, joins AM’s T.J. Holmes from Amman, Jordan.

Nematt says anti-government protests and how the violence is being handled in Egypt are having a "major influence on public opinion" throughout the Middle East, especially in Jordan, which he calls a "moderating force" for the United States in the Middle East.

Nematt describes why Jordanian protesters are taking to the streets and how the king is reacting.


Filed under: TV-American Morning
Socialism for capitalist
February 3rd, 2011
11:57 AM ET

Socialism for capitalist

The No. 1 bestselling book “The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine” that details the 2008 financial crisis is now out on paperback with a new afterword. Today on American Morning, "Big Short" author Michael Lewis talks about the roller-coaster ride of the economy last year and the reactions to the book by some of its subjects, including members of Congress.

Lewis also gives his insight on the protests in Egypt and the economic toll they may have on the financial markets in the United States. Watch to see why he says Wall Street is always looking for something to blame.


Filed under: TV-American Morning
Ads for the everyman
February 3rd, 2011
11:49 AM ET

Ads for the everyman

Miller High Life markets itself as the beer for the everyman. And now the company is launching an ad campaign for the everyman too.

Miller High Life will air new commercials that revolve around the customer. Consumers will be able to sign up with Miller High Life to be "sponsored" and will then have the choice of receiving a $1 check, a $1 coupon for Miller High Life or donating $1 to U.S. veterans.

Windell Middlebrooks, the man starring in the ads, talks to T.J. Holmes about the philosophy behind the Miller High Life campaign and gives American Morning a preview of a new commercial.


Filed under: TV-American Morning
Egypt’s inspiration
February 3rd, 2011
11:00 AM ET

Egypt’s inspiration

Who are the pro-democracy protesters leading the demonstrations on the streets of Egypt? While protesters of all ages have all been spotted participating, the young generation—bound together by the internet— is significantly influencing the rising movement in the country.

TIME’s cover story takes a closer look into the pro-democracy protesters. The organizers are young, but maybe not as young as you think. Check out American Morning’s preview of the piece with its author Bobby Ghosh, deputy international editor of TIME.

What other countries in the Middle East and North Africa have rising youth movements? Find out here.


Filed under: TV-American Morning
Egypt’s treasures at risk
Soldiers guard the Egyptian Museum in Cairo from looters on Monday.
February 3rd, 2011
08:48 AM ET

Egypt’s treasures at risk

Egyptologists and archaeologists have been uneasy since late last week when the unrest in Egypt led to damage to some of the nation's priceless treasures. On Friday, looters at the Cairo Museum damaged two statues of King Tutankhamun, broke 13 glass showcases and damaged 70 other antiquities. There have also been reports of looting at dig sites around the country.

This morning, Dr. Bob Brier, Egyptologist, tells American Morning’s Kiran Chetry and TJ Holmes what damage has been done, how it can be repaired, and how some Egyptians are banding together to protect the museums.

Brier says the entire country of Egypt is a "vast outdoor museum," and that the monuments are certainly not safe.


Filed under: TV-American Morning
U.S. student opts to stay in Egypt
A man shouts slogans during Tuesday's protest at Cairo's Tahrir Square.
February 1st, 2011
11:17 AM ET

U.S. student opts to stay in Egypt

Thousands of American tourists and residents are fleeing Cairo, taking State Department-chartered flights sent to ferry American citizens out of the escalating crisis zone. But amid the chaos, one young American woman has decided to stay and document the uprising from the frontlines.

Lauren Bohn, a 23-year-old Fulbright Fellow studying Arabic and journalism at American University in Cairo, told CNN's "American Morning" on Tuesday what she is seeing on the ground and what prompted her to remain in Cairo.

"I've been caught in some tear gas and bumped around a few times, but, if anything, the people here on the ground are very protective of foreigners," Bohn says.

"It's been essentially a media blackstorm," Bohn said about reports of media outages in Cairo. "I was able to tweet yesterday for about an hour. I found internet. I can't tell you where I found it, but I was able to upload some video and people have been able to call me on my cell phone, on my Blackberry."

Bohn said although she's been unable to make outgoing international calls, she can receive them. "It's been completely demobilizing, and, of course, that's the whole point," she said.

She said she has not felt any danger or hostility toward Americans from demonstrators.

"They're embracing me on the ground and embracing people on the ground," Bohn said.

"They want to make sure that the U.S. government is hearing them."

What a judge's ruling means for Obama's health care law
February 1st, 2011
10:37 AM ET

What a judge's ruling means for Obama's health care law

A federal judge in Florida has tossed out the sweeping health care reform law championed by President Barack Obama, setting up what is likely to be a contentious Supreme Court challenge over the legislation in coming months. Monday's sweeping ruling came in the most closely watched of the two dozen separate challenges to the law. Florida, along with 25 other states, had filed a lawsuit last spring, seeking to dismiss a law critics had labeled "Obamacare."

Unlike the judge who ruled the individual mandate unconstitutional last month, the federal judge in Florida, U.S. District Judge Robert Vinson, ruled that the unconstitutionality voided the entire act.

So what does this mean for your health care coverage today?

Tuesday on "American Morning," CNN senior legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin explained how the law stands today. He described what parts of the law the judge ruled unconstitutional, why it may be the most far-reaching ruling yet, and what happens next.


Filed under: TV-American Morning
Who are the Muslim Brotherhood?
Two Egyptian men hang out in Alexandria near a poster with a message against Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood.
February 1st, 2011
10:23 AM ET

Who are the Muslim Brotherhood?

The scenes in Egypt have been dramatic, as thousands turn out onto the streets demanding that President Hosni Mubarak resign after 30 years in power. Few images have been more powerful than those of demonstrators dropping to the ground to pray in the face of security forces. And while some have been inspired by the role of religious faith in the protests, there are definite worries that the banned Muslim Brotherhood is waiting in the wings, hoping for a chance to take over.

The Muslim Brotherhood has been part of the political scene in Egypt for more than 80 years and advocates a move away from secularism and a return to the rules of the Quran. It's the oldest and largest opposition group in Egypt and is illegal under Egyptian law. And while the Brotherhood officially rejects the use of violent means to secure its goals, offshoots of the group have been linked to attacks in the past.

CNN terrorism analyst Paul Cruickshank has met with top leaders of the Muslim Brotherhood. Today on "American Morning," he gave his analysis on the Muslim Brotherhood's current role in Egypt. Cruickshank explains to AM's TJ Holmes why many are concerned about their influence and how their role in Egypt affects al Qaeda.

Learn more about the Muslim Brotherhood.


Filed under: TV-American Morning
Raw 'Skins': The drama and legal issues of MTV's new show
The cast of MTV's new show "Skins." The show has sparked controversy whether the "edgy" has gone too far.
January 21st, 2011
09:30 AM ET

Raw 'Skins': The drama and legal issues of MTV's new show

Brian Stetler, has reported on the controversy surrounding MTV's new drama 'Skins' and is a writer for the New York Times.

The series, based on the popular U.K. show of the same name, has been billed as "edgy" in how it tells the by now familiar story of foul-mouthed high school teens who spend a lot of time seeking sex and drugs.

Stetler speaks to CNN's Kiran Chetry about the investigations into child pornography the Justice Department and Congress are calling for.

Marquee blog: What's the verdict on 'Skins'?

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