Nancy Grace: I don't have to agree with Casey Anthony jury
HLN host and former prosecutor Nancy Grace broadcasts live during verdict watch in the Casey Anthony trial this week.
July 6th, 2011
08:56 PM ET

Nancy Grace: I don't have to agree with Casey Anthony jury

HLN host Nancy Grace has been credited with making the Casey Anthony case a national story. She has been outspoken in her belief that Anthony is guilty of murdering her daughter, despite a jury's verdict. She's also a former prosecutor with strong opinions about what went on in the Florida courtroom in the past few weeks. She spoke with CNN.com about how she would have tried the case, the "CSI effect" on juries and why she doesn't "give a fig" about what Anthony's defense team thinks about her.

Grace: As I’ve always said since 1984, when I started trying cases, you win or lose your case - it’s all over at the end of voir dire (jury selection). I’ve always believed that. It’s true. I think this jury hamstrung the state. The state absolutely put up a good case and I get real fed up when I hear this is a circumstantial case. Most cases are circumstantial because rarely do people commit felony crimes in the open. Murder, armed robbery, you do it in private, in secret, so very rarely is there an eyewitness or direct evidence to a crime.

CNN: Watching a case like this, do you miss the courtroom and prosecuting cases?

Grace: I always miss the courtroom. I miss the courtroom all the time because the courtroom gave me immediate gratification. I knew I’d done something worthwhile when I put someone behind bars or represented crime victims, I knew I had a done a good thing by speaking for people who couldn’t speak for themselves. I don’t get that immediate gratification from being on TV.

CNN: As a former prosecutor, if you could retry this case, how would you do it differently?

Grace: I think they did such a very good job it’s hard to attack anything they did. I think maybe I would’ve taken a different tack in jury selection but that’s really it. There were some obvious problem jurors: You had one on there with an arrest for DUI; another with an arrest for drug paraphernalia; one whose sister and her boyfriend beat up their father; one juror who said she could not judge. Why the heck would you not want someone off the jury who cannot judge? The jury is the sole judge of facts, evidence and the law. Who the heck wants someone who can’t judge? They tried to get rid of them but were not successful. I think the jury was snakebitten from the get-go.

CNN: What do you think is the most important piece of evidence that the jury never saw or heard?

Grace: I don’t believe they saw all of the audiotapes or heard all the videotapes (of Casey Anthony’s jailhouse phone calls). I think the so-called bodyguard or bail bondsman had a lot to offer, his discussions with tot mom when she was referring to Caylee in the past tense before her body had been found, her being very flip about Caylee, being more concerned about a hot guy flirting with her on Facebook. Evidence of that nature.

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July 5th, 2011
07:55 PM ET

Jury's verdict: Casey Anthony not guilty of murder

Editor's note: For more on the jury's finding that Casey Anthony is not guilty in daughter Caylee's death read our full story here.

[Updated at 8:20 p.m.] From the moment word came that Casey Anthony was acquitted of murdering her 2-year-old daughter, online networking sites were flooded with a cascade of amateur commentary. A few big names, including Kim Kardashian, joined the fray. Most condemned the verdict "no justice for Caylee" was a common comment which comes after years of the case serving as fodder for cable news, tabloids and the like.

[Updated at 7:55 p.m.] Mourners of Caylee Anthony want you to turn your porch lights on tonight in honor of the slain 2-year-old.

The Facebook event, "Porch lights on for Caylee Marie Anthony," urges people "all over the world" to start participating at "9 pm in your own time zone."

Already, 546,610 have said they're attending, and some say their lights are already on.

ALTERNATE JUROR SPEAKS

[Updated at 7:20 p.m.] Alternate juror Russell Huekler said he agrees with the jury's verdict "wholeheartedly" and surmised that Caylee Anthony's death was a "horrific accident" gone awry.

"The prosecution did not prove their case," said Huekler, who sat through the entire case but did not get to deliberate the charges.

Prosecutors failed to answer the question of how Caylee died, he said.

From the testimony, Huekler said he drew the conclusion that "it was probably a horrific accident" that Anthony and her father, George Anthony, covered up.

"Unfortunately it did snowball and got away from them," Huekler said. "It was such a horrific accident that they didn't know how to deal with it. The family appeared to be very dysufintional and instead of admitting there was an accident, they chose to hide it, for whatever reason."

CASEY ANTHONY'S FAMILY

[Updated at 5:08 p.m.] Attorney Mark Lippman issued a statement on behalf of Lee, George and Cindy Anthony:

While the family may never know what has happened to Caylee Marie Anthony, they now have closure for this chapter of their life. They will now begin the long process of rebuilding their lives.

Despite the baseless defense chosen by Casey Anthony, the family believes that the Jury made a fair decision based on the evidence presented, the testimony presented, the scientific information presented and the rules that were given to them by the Honorable Judge Perry to guide them.

The family hopes that they will be given the time by the media to reflect on this verdict and decide the best way to move forward privately.

The family also wanted the public to know that if anyone wanted to honor Caylee by leaving stuffed animals or other toys at any area near their home, that they would prefer those items be donated in Caylee’ s name to families in need, religious centers, or any other entity where the toys would be appreciated.

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Florida v. Casey Anthony: A look back at evidence and testimony
July 5th, 2011
05:22 PM ET

Florida v. Casey Anthony: A look back at evidence and testimony

A Florida jury on Tuesday found Casey Anthony not guilty in the 2008 death of her daughter, Caylee. Here's a look back at highlights from 33 days and more than 100 witnesses in the trial of the year:

Week 1: As Casey Anthony murder trial begins, mysteries remain

The case of Florida v. Casey Marie Anthony began with both sides summing up their versions of what they believed the evidence would show. From the prosecution, jurors heard a timeline of the defendant's activities before her mother reported Caylee missing: parties, drinking and sleepovers with men.

Those days included getting a tattoo, participating in a "hot body" contest at an Orlando club, many Caylee-free nights at her then-boyfriend Anthony Lazzaro's apartment and many, many lies, the prosecution said.

"No one else benefited from the death of Caylee Marie Anthony," said assistant state attorney Linda Drane-Burdick in her opening statement. "Caylee's death allowed Casey to live a good life, at least for those 31 days."

From the defense, jurors were presented with an image of loving mother, whose dysfunctional family forced her to live in a state of denial. They argued the family held dark secrets, including that Casey was sexually abused by her father and brother.

The defense also revealed their theory of the case: Caylee drowned in the family pool as the result of what Baez called "an accident that snowballed out of control." He said it was an accident to which Casey's father, George Anthony, was privy. Baez said George Anthony tried to cover up the drowning at Casey's expense.

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Psychologists: Casey Anthony is competent
Casey Anthony is accused of killing her two-year-old daughter.
June 27th, 2011
10:11 AM ET

Psychologists: Casey Anthony is competent

Casey Anthony, charged with killing her 2-year-old daughter in 2008, underwent examinations by three psychologists over the weekend after her defense team filed a motion to determine her competency to proceed, the judge in her trial said Monday.

All three psychologists found Anthony competent, Orange County Chief Judge Belvin Perry said out of the jury's presence. Their reports will be sealed, he said. It was implied - but not expressly stated - that the motion was the reason for the abrupt recess Perry called on Saturday.

The resumption of the trial Monday was delayed for more than a half-hour as attorneys huddled in Perry's chambers.

Saturday had been planned as an extended weekend work day in the trial. But Perry ordered a recess over the sudden emergence of what one analyst said must be a major issue.

"Obviously it's big, and obviously it's troublesome and obviously it's something that can't be disclosed," HLN legal analyst Linda Kenney Baden said.

Perry emerged from his chambers Saturday morning after nearly an hour of discussion with lawyers both inside and outside the courtroom to announce the day's planned testimony would be canceled.

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Body of honor student missing since December found, father says
April 21st, 2011
04:56 PM ET

Body of honor student missing since December found, father says

The body of a 17-year-old honor student from North Carolina - missing since December - has been found in a Maryland river, her father said Thursday.

Russel Barnes said that a female body found Wednesday in the Susquehanna River in Maryland is that of his daughter, Phylicia Barnes (pictured). The father said he'd learned as much after talking with authorities.

The teenage girl said she was going out to get something to eat and maybe a haircut when she left a residence in Baltimore where she'd been staying with her half-sister, according to that city's police.

Later, authorities said they feared that Barnes - who is from Charlotte - had been abducted or otherwise harmed. She'd left her debit card where she was staying, and hadn't answered her cell phone since her disappearance, her mother, Janice Sallis, told HLN's "Nancy Grace."

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50 people in 50 days: Teen missing after ride with brother's friend
Kayla Berg was last reported to have been seen in Wausau, Wisconsin, on August 11, 2009.
March 29th, 2011
03:52 PM ET

50 people in 50 days: Teen missing after ride with brother's friend

Editor's note: Nancy Grace's new show on HLN, "Nancy Grace: America's Missing," is dedicated to finding 50 people in 50 days. As part of the effort, which relies heavily on audience participation, CNN.com's news blog This Just In will feature the stories of the missing.

This is the 50th case, and it was shown Friday night on HLN.

Kayla Berg's mother remembers the last time they talked: On the phone, hours before the Wisconsin teenager’s last known sighting in August 2009.

"She had called me earlier that day," said Kayla's mother, Hope Sprenger. "[She] told me that she might possibly be going over by some friends, hanging out. If she did, she would give me a call back later.

"She told me that she loved me. I told her I loved her, too, and we would chat later. And that was the last time we heard from her."

Police say Kayla, 15, of Antigo, Wisconsin, disappeared after getting a ride from her brother’s friend on August 11, 2009.

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50 people in 50 days: Texas teen disappears in middle of night
Monica Carrasco was 16 when she disappeared in 2003.
March 24th, 2011
11:27 PM ET

50 people in 50 days: Texas teen disappears in middle of night

Editor's note: Nancy Grace's new show on HLN, "Nancy Grace: America's Missing," is dedicated to finding 50 people in 50 days. As part of the effort, which relies heavily on audience participation, CNN.com's news blog This Just In will feature the stories of the missing.

This is the 49th case, and it was shown Thursday night on HLN.

Monica Carrasco was 16 years old when she disappeared in the middle of the night from her aunt and uncle's home in Balmorhea, Texas, in October 2003.

The last time they'd seen her was around 1:30 a.m., before she went to sleep. The room she was staying in had a door to the outside, which wasn't locked when officers checked the home.

Monica was said to have had difficulty dealing with the death of her father three years earlier. She was under a doctor's care and needed medication.

Canines with the border patrol did a sweep of the area and were unable to pick up any scent of her. Since then, police have received thousands of tips, but none that have led anywhere.

50 people in 50 days: Woman disappeared after leaving party
Jamie Harper, shown in a 2005 photo, was 20 when she disappeared in March 2007.
March 23rd, 2011
09:59 PM ET

50 people in 50 days: Woman disappeared after leaving party

Editor's note: Nancy Grace's new show on HLN, "Nancy Grace: America's Missing," is dedicated to finding 50 people in 50 days. As part of the effort, which relies heavily on audience participation, CNN.com's news blog This Just In will feature the stories of the missing.

This is the 48th case, and it was shown Wednesday night on HLN.

Jamie Harper was supposed to stay at a friend's house after attending a party in Rantoul, Illinois, in March 2007.

Friends say she left the party on the early morning of March 10, but she didn't arrive at the friend's house and she never returned to her own home in Paxton, Illinois.

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50 people in 50 days: Former child actor disappears
Jason Pilcher appeared in movies such as "The Fan" and "Varsity Blues" before he went missing.
March 22nd, 2011
09:10 PM ET

50 people in 50 days: Former child actor disappears

Editor's note: Nancy Grace's new show on HLN, "Nancy Grace: America's Missing," is dedicated to finding 50 people in 50 days. As part of the effort, which relies heavily on audience participation, CNN.com's news blog This Just In will feature the stories of the missing.

This is the 47th case, and it will be shown Tuesday at 9 p.m. on HLN.

Former child actor Joseph "Joe" Pichler was 18 when he disappeared from his hometown of Bremerton, Washington, more than five years ago.

Friends last saw him in the early morning of January 5, 2006, in Pichler's apartment, where he had been playing cards. After several people were unable to reach him in the coming days, they reported him missing. His vehicle subsequently was found abandoned behind a Bremerton restaurant four days after he was last seen, according to his family.

His family still doesn’t know what happened to him.

Pichler worked as a child actor in local commercials before moving to Los Angeles in the mid-90s. He appeared in movies such as "The Fan," "Varsity Blues" and "Children on Their Birthdays" before moving back to Bremerton, where he graduated high school. He looked forward to moving back to California to resume acting, his family said.

50 people in 50 days: Authorities search for California woman's body
March 21st, 2011
11:10 PM ET

50 people in 50 days: Authorities search for California woman's body

Editor's note: Nancy Grace's new show on HLN, "Nancy Grace: America's Missing," is dedicated to finding 50 people in 50 days. As part of the effort, which relies heavily on audience participation, CNN.com's news blog This Just In will feature the stories of the missing.

This is the 46th case, and it was shown Monday night on HLN.

Police say they believe California resident Dawn Viens, who disappeared in October 2009, is dead, but her body has not been found.

HLN reports that authorities say her husband is a suspect in the case. Viens, then 39, was last seen leaving the restaurant owned by her husband in Lomita, California, they say.

Joe Cacace, one of her friends, told HLN that her husband told him that they had an argument, but that she had walked away and didn't come back.

50 people in 50 days: Woman on vacation last seen at nightclub
Stepha Henry Henry was visiting an aunt in South Florida over Memorial Day weekend 2007 when she disappeared.
March 18th, 2011
09:20 PM ET

50 people in 50 days: Woman on vacation last seen at nightclub

Editor's note: Nancy Grace's new show on HLN, "Nancy Grace: America's Missing," is dedicated to finding 50 people in 50 days. As part of the effort, which relies heavily on audience participation, CNN.com's news blog This Just In will feature the stories of the missing.

This is the 45th case, and it was shown Friday at 9 p.m. on HLN.

Stepha Henry, 22, disappeared after going to a party at a nightclub in Sunrise, Florida.

Henry and her teenage sister were visiting an aunt in South Florida over Memorial Day weekend in 2007. Her aunt said she left her apartment about 1 a.m. to go to a club called Peppers Cafe. The aunt said she saw her get into a car driven by a family acquaintance, Kendrick Williams.

Initially, Williams told investigators he had left the club early and that Henry had decided to stay. She has not been seen since. But a forensic analysis of his car revealed substantial evidence that detectives were able to conclusively link to Henry, police said.

Williams was charged with Henry's murder, but her body has not been found.

50 people in 50 days: Girl last seen working at store in 1990
Rosemary Diaz, 15, played the flute and was a favorite of her teachers. She vanished in November 1990.
March 17th, 2011
09:25 PM ET

50 people in 50 days: Girl last seen working at store in 1990

Editor's note: Nancy Grace's new show on HLN, "Nancy Grace: America's Missing," is dedicated to finding 50 people in 50 days. As part of the effort, which relies heavily on audience participation, CNN.com's news blog This Just In will feature the stories of the missing.

This is the 44th case, and it was shown Thursday night on HLN.

Rosemary Diaz, 15, was excited about entering the work force as a clerk at Dane's Country Store just down the road from home in Danevang, a one-traffic-light town south of Houston that is known as the Danish capital of Texas. The small convenience store sold everything from hamburgers to gasoline, and Rosemary was trusted to do the work on her own.

On the night of November 24, 1990, just weeks into the job, Rosemary was waiting for her sister. Elia, to visit her at the store, police say. Rosemary called home at 7:30 p.m. to make sure they were still coming.

Soon afterward, two customers entered the shop, and no clerk was to be found. Office hurried to the store and found Rosemary's car parked outside. Her purse with cash and her paycheck were left behind in the store, police say. No money was missing from the register, and there were no obvious signs of a struggle. Only the soda machine had been moved and the front leg bent.

To this day, there are no strong leads and for Rosemary's family, many nagging 'what ifs'. Elia Diaz says she almost stopped by the store earlier that day to buy a drink. Instead she drove to her mom's house first.

"Maybe I would have saved her."

50 People in 50 days: Stacy Peterson's disappearance remains a mystery
March 16th, 2011
10:59 PM ET

50 People in 50 days: Stacy Peterson's disappearance remains a mystery

Editor's note: Nancy Grace's new show on HLN, "Nancy Grace: America's Missing," is dedicated to finding 50 people in 50 days. As part of the effort, which relies heavily on audience participation, CNN.com's news blog This Just In will feature the stories of the missing.

This is the 43rd case, and it was shown Wednesday at 9 p.m. on HLN.

Not long after 23-year-old Stacy Peterson disappeared in October 2007, the search became overshadowed by suspicions against her husband, Drew Peterson.

Stacy Peterson was the former officer's fourth wife. They began living together in Bolingbrook, Illinois, while he was going through a contentious divorce from his previous wife, Kathleen Savio. She was later found dead in a bathtub in 2004.

Police have investigated the sites of several remains for Stacy Peterson near the couple's home without success.

Meanwhile, Stacy Peterson's disappearance prompted authorities to reopen the case into Kathleen Savio's death, resulting in murder charges against Drew Peterson in her death. He is awaiting trial, while the families of the two victims await answers and justice.

50 people in 50 days: 'Good girl' disappears on way to drugstore
Kimberly Arrington was 16 when she disappeared October 30, 1998, in Montgomery, Alabama.
March 15th, 2011
06:57 PM ET

50 people in 50 days: 'Good girl' disappears on way to drugstore

Editor's note: Nancy Grace's new show on HLN, "Nancy Grace: America's Missing," is dedicated to finding 50 people in 50 days. As part of the effort, which relies heavily on audience participation, CNN.com's news blog This Just In will feature the stories of the missing.

This is the 42nd case, and it was shown Tuesday at 9 p.m. on HLN.

Kimberly Arrington's mother died without knowing what had become of her daughter, who disappeared in 1998 without a trace.

But the memory of the 16-year-old lives on among those who love her. Kimberly's father still waits for her to come home, and her sister named her daughter after her missing aunt.

Kimberly left the family's home in Montgomery, Alabama, around 5 p.m. on October 30, 1998, telling her mother that she was going to a nearby CVS drugstore. She never came home.

Kimberly was a "good girl," a friendly, outgoing teen who accepted everyone with open arms. Someone may have asked his daughter for directions, Walter Arrington believes, and forced her into a car.

"Most people liked her, and she was very friendly towards everybody," he said. "I felt like maybe that's part of the reason why they got her."

50 people in 50 days: Man says girl vanished from his car
March 11th, 2011
08:34 PM ET

50 people in 50 days: Man says girl vanished from his car

Editor's note: Nancy Grace's new show on HLN, "Nancy Grace: America's Missing," is dedicated to finding 50 people in 50 days. As part of the effort, which relies heavily on audience participation, CNN.com's news blog This Just In will feature the stories of the missing.

This is the 40th case.

Tangena Hussein was 2 when her mother's boyfriend reported her missing in Detroit on October 2, 2008.

The man told police he put her in his car, and he began driving to a mall to pick up Tangena's mother from work. On the way, he stopped at a Detroit gas station, left Tangena in his locked car and went inside the store to get some gum, he told police.

He told police that when he exited the gas station, Tangena was no longer in the car. He reportedly drove to the mall to pick up Tangena's mother before returning to the gas station to call police and report the girl's disappearance.

Police say the vehicle showed no signs of forced entry. They say they don't know what happened to Tangena.

50 people in 50 days: Woman disappeared after leaving Ohio workplace
March 10th, 2011
08:43 PM ET

50 people in 50 days: Woman disappeared after leaving Ohio workplace

Editor's note: Nancy Grace's new show on HLN, "Nancy Grace: America's Missing," is dedicated to finding 50 people in 50 days. As part of the effort, which relies heavily on audience participation, CNN.com's news blog This Just In will feature the stories of the missing.

This is the 39th case, and it will be shown Thursday at 9 p.m. on HLN.

After working the second shift as an assembly line supervisor at a Honda plant in Union County, Ohio, 29-year-old Patricia Adkins (pictured) clocked out at midnight on June 29, 2001.

Friends say she was going to spend the Fourth of July week with a married co-worker with whom she'd been having an affair. The two allegedly were headed to a remote part of Canada.

When the single mother didn't pick up her daughter as scheduled on July 8, relatives reported her missing. Police say they've questioned the married co-worker several times, and that he is the only person of interest in the case, but no charges have been filed.

50 people in 50 days: Girl vanished after mom left for meeting
March 9th, 2011
06:19 PM ET

50 people in 50 days: Girl vanished after mom left for meeting

Editor's note: Nancy Grace's new show on HLN, "Nancy Grace: America's Missing," is dedicated to finding 50 people in 50 days. As part of the effort, which relies heavily on audience participation, CNN.com's news blog This Just In will feature the stories of the missing.

This is the 38th case, and it will be shown Wednesday at 9 p.m. on HLN.

Andrea Durham's mother said she last saw the teen in their Florida apartment as the mother left to attend a meeting in February 1990.

Andrea, 13, was supposed to be vacuuming. When her mother returned two hours later, a vacuum cleaner was standing upright in the family room, but Andrea was gone - and her family hasn't seen her since.

Police said they found no signs of forced entry or foul play in the Fort Walton Beach apartment, and none of Andrea's personal items was missing.

50 people in 50 days: Teen failed to arrive at sister's Kentucky home
March 9th, 2011
05:43 PM ET

50 people in 50 days: Teen failed to arrive at sister's Kentucky home

Editor's note: Nancy Grace's new show on HLN, "Nancy Grace: America's Missing," is dedicated to finding 50 people in 50 days. As part of the effort, which relies heavily on audience participation, CNN.com's news blog This Just In will feature the stories of the missing.

This is the 36th case, and it was shown Monday night on HLN.

Police say Paige Johnson, 17, disappeared last fall after leaving her Kentucky home with an acquaintance on the night of September 22.

The acquaintance, a 22-year-old man, says he spent a couple of hours with her at his home before dropping her off early in the morning in Covington, Kentucky, a few blocks from her sister's home, where she was supposed to stay, according to police.

Her sister reported her missing because Paige didn't arrive. The man has not been charged in the case.

50 people in 50 days: Teen drove into ditch, vanished as parents searched
Minnesota college freshman Brandon Swanson, shown with his sister, Jamine, disappeared in May 2008.
March 8th, 2011
03:35 PM ET

50 people in 50 days: Teen drove into ditch, vanished as parents searched

"Editor's note: Nancy Grace's new show on HLN, "Nancy Grace: America's Missing," is dedicated to finding 50 people in 50 days. As part of the effort, which relies heavily on audience participation, CNN.com's news blog This Just In will feature the stories of the missing.

This is the 37th case, and it will be shown Tuesday night on HLN.

Brandon Swanson called his parents shortly after midnight on May 14, 2008, to ask them for a ride after driving his car into a ditch. His parents set out in their pickup truck to find him in the nearby town of Lynd, Minnesota. Brandon became frustrated as their efforts to find him turned fruitless. They exchanged several calls just before 2 a.m. and eventually carried on a long conversation while the younger Swanson was walking, trying to direct his father to where he was.

He told his father to look for him at a nightclub parking lot that was a popular meeting spot in Lynd. But at the 47-minute mark, the call ended abruptly. The teen shouted an expletive, and the phone went dead.

It was the last time anyone heard from him.

At 6:30 a.m., Annette Swanson called the Lynd Police Department to report Brandon missing, and officers eventually joined the search. They, too, came up with nothing, and a countywide request was dispatched to expand the search.

Phone records later showed that the teen was nowhere near Lynd, where he told his parents he was. His cell phone calls were traced to a tower 20 miles away in Minnesota.

Anyone with information that could lead to the whereabouts of Brandon Swanson is asked to call the Lincoln County Sheriff at (507) 694-1664.

50 people in 50 days: Mom walks to mailbox in pajamas, never seen again
March 4th, 2011
10:35 PM ET

50 people in 50 days: Mom walks to mailbox in pajamas, never seen again

"Editor's note: Nancy Grace's new show on HLN, "Nancy Grace: America's Missing," is dedicated to finding 50 people in 50 days. As part of the effort, which relies heavily on audience participation, CNN.com's news blog This Just In will feature the stories of the missing.

This is the 35th case, and it was shown Friday night on HLN.

Venus Stewart walked out to her mailbox in her pajamas to mail a letter the morning of April 26, 2010, and was never seen again.

Police believe the young mother of two little girls is dead, but a body has not been found. Drag marks in the yard pointed to signs of a struggle. Search warrants later revealed blood believed to belong to the 32-year-old mother in her estranged husband’s truck, along with a receipt for a shovel, tarp and gloves.

The estranged husband, Doug Stewart, is on trial for Stewart’s murder. While Venus’ family finds solace with the justice system, they want to find their daughter to give her a proper burial.

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