September 25th, 2013
11:07 AM ET

Gotta Watch: Soldier shocks daughter on football field

13-year-old Bella Lund thought she was on the field during a University of Wisconsin-Madison football game as part of the team’s tradition of honoring a military family of the game during home games.

What she didn’t know was that her mom, Army Captain Jane Renee “J.R.” Lund, was returning home from a 6-month deployment in Afghanistan. Lund stood a few yards behind her daughter on the sidelines waiting to surprise her with a cheering crowd of more than 80,000 fans as an audience.

The reunion that followed is sure to warm any heart.

Check out the full video here:

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Filed under: Gotta Watch • Military • U.S. Army
September 22nd, 2013
07:01 PM ET

Two missing after crash of U.S. Navy helicopter in Red Sea

Three crew members aboard a U.S. Navy helicopter that crashed in the Red Sea on Sunday were found alive and in stable condition, the Navy said. Two others remained missing.

The MH-60S Knighthawk was operating with the guided-missile destroyer USS William P. Lawrence when it went down in the central Red Sea, which lies between Africa and the Arabian Peninsula.

Search efforts are under way for the two remaining crew members.

FULL STORY
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Filed under: U.S. Navy
Blog: Navy looking to 'see what red flags, if any, were missed'
U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Martin Dempsey prepare to lay a wreath at the U.S. Navy Memorial plaza on Tuesday to honor the victims of Monday's Washington Navy Yard shootings.
September 17th, 2013
06:13 PM ET

Blog: Navy looking to 'see what red flags, if any, were missed'

  • 12 people were killed and at least eight were injured in shooting at Washington Navy Yard, authorities say
  • The shooter, Aaron Alexis, 34, was killed in confrontation with security
  • Alexis was information-technology contractor and former full-time Navy reservist who lived in Texas
  • Live updates below. Also, read the full story and a profile of Alexis.

[Updated 8:13 p.m. ET] Alexis entered Building 197 at Washington's Navy Yard with a small bag that is believed to contain a disassembled shotgun he used in the mass shooting, a federal law enforcement official says. Surveillance video shows Alexis ducking into a bathroom with the bag and leaving it with a shotgun, according to the source.

Alexis had 00 buckshot shells, each of which are packed with a dozen pellets and are capable of causing tremendous damage, the same law enforcement official says.

[Updated 8:08 p.m. ET] Alexis contacted two Veterans Affairs hospitals in and around Washington recently and got treated for sleep-related issues, a law enforcement source says. A second law enforcement source tells CNN that, as far as investigators know now, Alexis sought help for insomnia. But another source said Alexis asked for help because he was "having problems sleeping" and "hearing voices."

[Updated 8:05 p.m. ET] Rep. Michael McCaul, chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, tells CNN that the eight instances of misconduct that Alexis had while in the Navy "were kind of swept under the rug." “There is a tendency to not want to deal with a problem," McCaul says. "It is real easy to just pass the buck along to another military base or, in this instance, to a defense contractor.”

[Updated 8:03 p.m. ET] Navy officers knew about an incident in which Alexis was arrested for shooting the tires of a car - in what he later told detectives was an anger-fueled "blackout" - but admitted him to the Navy and gave him secret security clearance in 2007 anyway, a senior Naval officer told CNN.

"It appears as if investigators were aware of the incident, interviewed him and were satisfied that it did not preclude granting the clearance," the officer said.

[Updated 7:56 p.m. ET] The Experts, the contracting firm for which Alexis worked for about six months over the past year, said it performed two background checks on him and confirmed twice with the Defense Department that Alexis had a secret security clearance. "The latest background check and security clearance confirmation were in late June of 2013 and revealed no issues other than one minor traffic violation," the company says in a statement.

[Updated 7:36 p.m. ET] Alexis paid $419 to buy a shotgun at Sharpshooters Small Arms Range, said the store's lawyer,  J. Michael Slocum. Slocum also said that he made the purchase on Saturday afternoon - and not Sunday, as he had earlier told CNN.

[Original post at 4:14 p.m. ET] Alexis bought a shotgun and about 24 shells on Sunday the day before the shooting from the Sharpshooters Small Arms Range in northern Virginia, the store's attorney, J. Michael Slocum, said.

Before buying the Remington 870 shotgun and the ammunition, he used a store rifle at a practice range, and he was at the store for at least a couple hours, Slocum said.

Video of Alexis at the store has been given to the FBI, according to Slocum.

[Updated 7:27 p.m. ET] Aaron Alexis' dark blue rented Toyota Prius was towed Tuesday from the Washington hotel where he'd been staying, a law enforcement source says.

[Updated 6:29 p.m. ET] Navy spokesman John Kirby says that authorities are looking to "see what red flags, if any, were missed" ahead of Aaron Alexis's mass shooting at Washington's Navy Yard.  Alexis got security clearance in 2007, and it was still valid when he left the Navy in 2011, according to Kirby.

As to Alexis's issues while in the service - including eight "relatively minor" instances of misconduct - the Navy spokesman said, “He wasn’t a stellar sailor, we know that.”

[Updated 6:17 p.m. ET]   Washington, D.C., police Officer Scott Williams shot and killed Aaron Alexis, ending the latter's rampage at the historic Navy Yard, Mayor Vincent Gray told CNN.  Williams is in good spirits after undergoing surgery tied to his being shot in the leg, according to Gray.

[Updated 6:12 p.m. ET] The Washington Navy Yard will be opened Wednesday to "essential" personnel only, says base spokesman Ed Zeigler. "Access to Building 197 is still prohibited," he added, referring to the building where the shooting occurred.

[Updated 4:04 p.m. ET] Police in Newport, Rhode Island, say Alexis contacted them while he was staying there in August, complaining that he was hearing voices and was worried that three people were harassing him, according to CNN's Deborah Feyerick.

Newport police say they contacted the Newport naval base in August about their encounter with Alexis, who was working there as an information-technology contractor.

Alexis told Newport police that during a flight from Virginia to Rhode Island, he got into a “verbal altercation” with someone, Newport Police Lt. William Fitzgerald said.

Fitzgerald says Alexis told police “he was a naval contractor who travels often.” He explained that during a flight from Virginia to Rhode Island, he got into a “verbal altercation” with an individual. Alexis told police he believed that the “individual had sent three people to follow him and to talk, keep him awake and send vibrations into his body," Fitzgerald said.

According to a police report, Alexis said he first heard the people talking to him through a wall at a Middletown hotel where he was staying. He packed up and went to an unidentified hotel on the naval base where he heard the same voices talking to him, so he moved to a third hotel.

According to Fitzgerald, Alexis heard the people “speaking to him through the floor and then ceiling.“ Alexis said the individuals were “using a microwave machine to send vibrations through the ceiling, penetrating his body so he could not speak.”

Fitzgerald said Alexis would not elaborate or tell police what his alleged harassers were saying, but he told police “he never felt anything like this and felt these individuals would harm him.”

Earlier Tuesday, a source with direct knowledge of the investigation told Feyerick that Alexis exhibited signs of mental problems in recent months and tried to get help at a Veterans Affairs facility in Rhode Island.

[Updated 3:27 p.m. ET] Alexis bought a shotgun from Sharpshooters Small Arms Range in the last few weeks, an attorney for the store said, according to CNN's Chris Lawrence.

The attorney, J. Michael Slocum, said Alexis had a valid driver's license, and the gun shop "did the full required background check, the same that's done when someone buys a weapon of any sort." Slocum indicated there was nothing in the background check to stop the sale to Alexis.

Slocum also said the FBI visited the store once since Monday's shooting, and that the store is cooperating with the investigation.

The FBI has said the Alexis used a shotgun in the shooting.

[Updated 2:28 p.m. ET] The news conference is over. Some more highlights from D.C. Police Chief Cathy Lanier: She said that within seven minutes of the first emergency call, police had at least two units inside the building where the shooting was happening.

The first unit arrived at the yard itself within two minutes of the call. It took police a while to determine which building was the shooting site, because callers were giving different building numbers, she said.

Security personnel from several agencies had "multiple engagements" with Alexis before the final shots were fired, she said.

[Updated 2:23 p.m. ET] More from the news conference: D.C. Police Chief Cathy Lanier elaborated on why she thinks the officer who was shot in both legs will make a full recovery, when there had been questions Monday of whether he would walk again.

"We have a very good prognosis from the doctors," Lanier said. She said that because of his personality, she believes that he will eventually be "outrunning all of us."

[Updated 2:15 p.m. ET] More from the news conference: The Washington police officer who was shot in both legs Monday is doing well, D.C. Police Chief Cathy Lanier said. He had surgery Monday.

“We expect he will make a full recovery,” Lanier said.

Earlier, CNN's Chris Lawrence reported that physicians were expected to begin determining Tuesday whether the officer would be able to keep the limbs.

Also, Lanier said at the news conference that there's "no doubt in my mind" that the officers responding to the shooting "saved numerous lives."

[Updated 2:11 p.m. ET] More from the news conference: Alexis arrived in the Washington area on or about August 25, staying in hotels, said Valerie Parlave, assistant director in charge of the Washington FBI field office.

He most recently stayed at a Residence Inn in southwestern Washington, D.C., beginning around September 7, she said. Anyone who contacted him during that time should contact the FBI, she said.

[Updated 2:08 p.m. ET] FBI and other officials have begun a news conference in Washington, updating reporters on the investigation.

Alexis entered the yard's building 197 where the shooting took place with a shotgun, and investigators believe he obtained a handgun inside the building after he started shooting, Valerie Parlave, assistant director in charge of the Washington FBI field office, said moments ago at a news conference. This confirms what federal law enforcement sources said earlier.

[Updated 2:01 p.m. ET] U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel is ordering a worldwide review of physical security measures at all U.S. military installations in the wake of Monday's shooting, a senior Pentagon official said Tuesday, according to CNN's Barbara Starr.

Hagel will order the military to look at all existing security measures to see if they are sufficient and to determine what other measures may be needed, the official said.

At the same time, the Pentagon is still trying to determine what it needs to do to begin a parallel review of security clearances and access standards for contractors and other employees, according to a Defense Department official. Some elements of clearance procedures are handled by other parts of the government so coordination will be required, but the official said it’s expected some review of that element will also take place.

This follow an earlier confirmation from the Navy that it was beginning a similar physical security review at all of its installations.

[Updated 1:13 p.m. ET] Alexis was “having problems sleeping” and was “hearing voices,” a source with direct knowledge of the investigation said, according to CNN's Deborah Feyerick. The source said Alexis exhibited signs of mental problems in recent months and tried to get help at a Veterans Affairs facility in Rhode Island. He had been working in Newport, Rhode Island, as an information-technology contractor in August.

The source also said that the 9/11 attacks triggered Alexis to leave his home in New York City. Alexis could not deal with the attack, left New York and essentially became a wanderer going from place to place – San Diego, Texas, and overseas, the source said.

His father told Seattle police in 2004 after Alexis was arrested there that his son was suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder after taking part in 9/11 rescue efforts, according to police records.

Earlier Tuesday, law enforcement sources told CNN that Alexis recently made contact with two Veterans Administration hospitals for apparent psychological issues.

[Updated 12:44 p.m. ET] A gun store in northern Virginia, Sharpshooters Small Arms Range in Lorton, released a statement in response to inquiries about Alexis. For context: An FBI source with firsthand knowledge of the investigation told CNN that one of the weapons Alexis is accused of using was purchased recently at a northern Virginia store. The Sharpshooters statement, shown below, does not affirm that it sold Alexis the gun.

"Sharpshooters Small Arms Range has been and continues to fully cooperate with law enforcement authorities in their investigation of the events at the Washington Navy Yard," Sharpshooters said. "In light of the many questions surrounding the event, it is not appropriate to provide any comment at this time, except to affirm that Sharpshooters fully complies with all requirements to conduct background checks on all potential purchasers as required by law, and to further affirm that all purchasers are required to comply with all laws concerning allowed purchases."

[Updated 12:06 p.m. ET] The Navy began proceedings in 2010 to give Alexis a "general discharge" from the Navy Reserve because of military and civilian disciplinary issues, but eventually gave him an honorable discharge in January 2011 because of a lack of evidence supporting the sterner measure, a U.S. defense official told CNN's Barbara Starr.

The disciplinary issues include at least eight instances of misconduct while on duty, the official said.

The attempt to give him a general discharge began after the Navy learned of his 2008 arrest in Georgia (on suspicion of disorderly conduct) and his 2010 arrest in Texas (over an allegation that he fired a gun through the ceiling of his apartment), the official said.

Alexis was a full-time Navy reservist from mid-2007 to January 2011.

[Updated 11:53 a.m. ET] We now have all the slain victims' names. The latest five to be released by Washington police are:

– Arthur Daniels, 51, of Washington, D.C.
- Mary Francis Knight, 51, of Reston, Virginia
- Gerald L. Read, 58, of Alexandria, Virginia
- Martin Bodrog, 54, of Annandale, Virginia
- Richard Michael Ridgell, 52, of Westminster, Maryland

On Monday night, Washington police released the first seven names:

– Michael Arnold, 59, of Lorton, Virginia
- Sylvia Frasier, 53, of Waldorf, Maryland
- Kathy Gaarde, 62, of Woodbridge, Virginia
- John Roger Johnson, 73, of Derwood, Maryland
- Frank Kohler, 50, of Tall Timbers, Maryland
- Kenneth Bernard Proctor, 46, of Waldorf, Maryland
- Vishnu Schalchendia Pandit, 61, of North Potomac, Maryland

[Updated 11:46 a.m. ET] It's back to baseball on Tuesday for the Washington Nationals, who postponed a Monday game as the organization allowed the Navy to use one of their parking lots as a site where Navy Yard evacuees could reunite with their loved ones.

The Nationals will wear their "Patriotic Blue" jerseys in the first game of a double-header with the visiting Atlanta Braves, the team said. The first game, to start at 1:05 p.m., is the make-up for Monday's postponement.

The Navy Yard is just blocks from Nationals Park.

[Updated 11:30 a.m. ET] Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus on Tuesday will "order reviews of all physical security at all Navy and Marine Corps installations," a U.S. Navy official told CNN's Barbara Starr.

"The first will be a quick look to ensure all physical security requirements are being met. The second will be a deeper review to ensure the right physical and personal security requirements are in place," the official said.

Earlier, U.S. Rep. Mike Turner, an Ohio Republican and a member of the Armed Forces Committee, said he believed cost-cutting compromised security at the yard, and he wants a congressional briefing from the Pentagon inspector general on a Navy security audit that he says was released after Monday's shooting.

"It is my understanding that the IG report indicates the Navy may have implemented an unproven system in order to cut costs," Turner said. "I also learned that potentially numerous felons may have been able to gain restricted access to several military installations across the country due to insufficient background checks, increasing the risk to our military personnel and civilian employees."

[Updated 11:21 a.m. ET] Arrests don't automatically prevent people from getting security clearance, says Anita Gorecki-Robbins, a military justice lawyer.

Alexis, who had been arrested a few times since 2004, received Department of Defense security clearance so that he could work for The Experts, a subcontractor of HP Enterprise Services that was contracted to "refresh equipment used on the Navy Marine Corps Intranet network," according to a statement released by his employer.

Gorecki-Robbins told CNN's Chris Cuomo and Ashleigh Banfield that the Defense Department can decide to give security clearances to people who have been arrested. In Alexis' case, either the arrests weren't picked up in screening, or "someone did see (the arrests) and decided to give it to him anyway."

[Updated 10:19 a.m. ET] A former Army attorney says the shooting should raise questions about whether military installations should randomly check vehicles.

Alexis entered the Navy Yard because he had a valid military-issued ID and was assigned to work there as a contractor. Greg Rinckey, a former attorney in the Army judge advocate general's office, told CNN's John Berman that the shooting could boost arguments for random vehicle checks, even for people with valid credentials.

Authorities have recovered three weapons from the scene of the mass shooting, including a shotgun that investigators believe Alexis brought into the compound, federal law enforcement sources with detailed knowledge of the investigation told CNN on Tuesday. The other two weapons handguns may have been taken from guards, the sources say.

[Updated 10:09 a.m. ET] To honor the shooting victims, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel and Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Martin Dempsey have just placed a wreath near the "The Lone Sailor" statue at Washington's U.S. Navy Memorial plaza.

Other federal officials are marking the shooting, too. Nearly 10 minutes ago, the U.S. Senate observed some moments of silence.

[Updated 9:59 a.m. ET] If you're wondering how Alexis could have been honorably discharged from the Navy Reserve in 2011 after a pattern of misconduct, a former Army attorney might have an answer.

Greg Rinckey, a former attorney in the Army judge advocate general's office, told CNN's John Berman that a pattern of misconduct doesn't necessarily result in an other-than-honorable discharge but an honorable discharge might not be Alexis' full story, either.

“Most people with patterns of misconduct are discharged usually with an other-than-honorable discharge or a general discharge," Rinckey, of Albany, New York, said Tuesday morning. "I think we need to dig a little bit further into this to see if it was a general-under-honorable-conditions discharge or an honorable discharge.”

Alexis, who served as a full-time Navy reservist from 2007 to January 2011, was honorably discharged after a "pattern of misconduct," a U.S. defense official with knowledge of the investigation told CNN earlier on condition of anonymity. The official did not detail the misconduct.

[Updated 9:17 a.m. ET] Of the eight injured survivors, three were shot and those three were doing better today at MedStar Washington Hospital Center. A Washington policeman is in fair condition, a female civilian is in fair condition and another female civilian is in good condition.

The police officer was shot in his legs. As of Monday night, medical personnel had yet to determine whether he would be able to keep the limbs, CNN's Chris Lawrence reported.

[Updated 9:02 a.m. ET] Alexis, the dead gunman, recently made contact with two Veterans Administration hospitals for apparent psychological issues, law enforcement sources said Tuesday.

[Updated 8:57 a.m. ET] Alexis was arrested in August 2008 on a charge of disorderly conduct in DeKalb County, Georgia, county police said Tuesday.

This is in addition to at least two other arrests, dating back to at least 2004 when he was arrested in Seattle. In that incident, he was accused of shooting out the tires of a man's truck in an anger-fueled "blackout," according to a Seattle Police Department report.

In 2010, Alexis was arrested by Fort Worth, Texas, police but never charged over an allegation that he fired a gun through the ceiling of his apartment. According to records, he told police he accidentally fired it while cleaning it.

[Updated 8:55 a.m. ET] Authorities have recovered three weapons from the scene of the shooting, federal law enforcement sources said. Investigators believe Alexis brought a shotgun into the compound and may have taken two handguns from guards, the sources said.

Initial reports said Alexis used an AR-15 semiautomatic rifle during the attack, but by Tuesday, law enforcement sources with knowledge of the investigation said that was not the case.

It is believed that Alexis had rented an AR-15, but returned it before Monday's shooting, the officials said. Investigators have recovered three weapons from the scene, including a shotgun that Alexis is believed to have brought into the compound. The other two weapons handguns the sources say, may have been taken from guards.

September 17th, 2013
02:51 AM ET

Navy Yard shooting: 7 victims identified

They were civilians and contractors, just starting their day at a massive military compound that's normally a bastion of safety.

But for reasons that may never be known, a former Navy reservist cut their lives short when he went on a shooting rampage at Washington's Navy Yard on Monday.

Twelve families were left anguished. On Monday night, seven of them received dreaded news.

FULL STORY

Filed under: Crime • District of Columbia • Military • U.S. • U.S. Navy
Live blog: 12, plus suspect, dead after Navy Yard shooting
The FBI identified the dead suspect in Monday's shooting rampage at the Washington Navy Yard as Aaron Alexis, 34, a military contractor from Texas.
September 16th, 2013
10:47 PM ET

Live blog: 12, plus suspect, dead after Navy Yard shooting

Shots were fired Monday at a Washington Navy Yard building, killing at least 12 people and injuring 14 others, according to local officials and the Navy.

Also killed was a suspect, Aaron Alexis, a 34-year-old military information-technology contractor and former full-time Navy reservist who lived in Texas, the FBI said. One other gunman may be on the loose, police said.

The incident began about 8:20 a.m. ET when several shots were fired inside the Naval Sea Systems Command headquarters in the southeast portion of the capital. Developments below:

[Updated at 10:47 p.m. ET] Police released the names and ages of seven of the 12 people killed in the shooting. None of the seven was military personnel:

– Michael Arnold, 59
- Sylvia Frasier, 53
- Kathy Gaarde, 62
- John Roger Johnson, 73
- Frank Kohler, 50
- Kenneth Bernard Proctor, 46
- Vishnu Pandit, 61.

[Updated at 10:40 p.m. ET] Alexis had access to the yard because of his contracting work, and he used a valid pass to enter the yard, said Valerie Parlave, assistant director in charge of the Washington FBI field office.

[Updated at 10:39 p.m. ET] Besides the 13 people who were killed, eight people were injured in Monday morning's shooting, Washington Mayor Vincent Gray told reporters Monday night. Three of those were injured by gunfire, and the others had other types of injuries, such as contusions and chest pain.

Earlier Monday night, Navy Vice Adm. William D. French said 14 people were injured. The 13 dead include suspect Aaron Alexis.

[Updated at 10:38 p.m. ET] Washington police are confident that only one person was involved in Monday morning's shooting, and they are lifting a shelter-in-place order for residents who live nearby, Police Chief Cathy Lanier said Monday night. Authorities have said suspect Aaron Alexis, 34, was killed after an encounter with security.

FULL POST

August 30th, 2013
04:05 AM ET

UK, U.N. and U.S. get jitters over Syria

Going it alone against the Syrian government is not what President Barack Obama wants, U.S. Secretary of State Chuck Hagel said Friday.  But that scenario is looking more and more likely.

A day earlier, the United States' closest ally, Great Britain, backed out of a possible coalition. A U.N. Security Council meeting on Syria ended in deadlock, and in the U.S. Congress, doubts about military intervention are making the rounds.  

Skeptics are invoking Iraq, where the United States government under President George W. Bush marched to war based on a thin claim that former dictator Saddam Hussein was harboring weapons of mass destruction.

Full story


Filed under: David Cameron • Military • National security • NATO • Security • Syria • TV-Piers Morgan • TV-The Situation Room • U.S. • United Kingdom • War • World • World Update
August 27th, 2013
02:34 PM ET

Hagel on Syria: 'Ready to go' if ordered

With a flurry of diplomatic signals and activity, U.S. officials sought Tuesday to lay the groundwork for a possible military strike on Syria in response to last week's suspected chemical weapons attack that Washington blames on President Bashar al-Assad's regime.

Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel and Secretary of State John Kerry consulted allies and indicated potential imminent action by a coalition likely to include key NATO partners and regional powers.

Days after the United States moved warships armed with cruise missiles into the region, Hagel told the BBC on Tuesday that forces were ready to carry out a strike if ordered. A senior Defense Department official told CNN that any strike could be completed "within several days."

FULL STORY

Filed under: Military • Syria
August 27th, 2013
12:33 AM ET

Nuc base sacks security chief

A nuclear missile base in Montana that failed a safety test this month has let its security chief go.

The 341st Missile Wing at Malmstrom Air Force base operates about a third of the nation's Minuteman III nuclear missiles.

It did not relieve Col. David Lynch from his command over the security forces group because of the failure, the base said in a statement released this week. But missile wing commander, Col. Robert Stanley, will feel more confident about passing the next inspection without him.

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U.N.: Chemical weapons use must be punished
August 26th, 2013
01:35 AM ET

U.N.: Chemical weapons use must be punished

The use chemical weapons is a crime against humanity and must be punished, United Nations chief Ban Ki-Moon told journalists Monday in Seoul, South Korea.

Washington may be preparing to take on the role of the punisher, if reports the Syrian government used poison gas against civilians are verified.

U.N. inspectors on the ground in Syria may be close to doing that.

Full Story

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Filed under: Arab Spring • CNN Inside Syria • Iraq War • Military • Pentagon • Russia • Syria • U.S. Navy • War • World • World Update
August 22nd, 2013
05:14 PM ET

Army sergeant says Afghan killing spree was 'act of cowardice'

The Army sergeant who admitted to gunning down 16 civilians in a 2012 rampage through two villages near his outpost in southern Afghanistan reportedly apologized Thursday, describing the massacre as an "act of cowardice."

Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales pleaded guilty in June to more than 30 criminal charges, including 16 premeditated murder counts.

The plea spares the 39-year-old Bales the prospect of a death sentence in the killings. He now faces life in prison, but a jury of four officers and two enlisted personnel will decide whether he will have a chance at parole.

FULL STORY
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Filed under: Afghanistan • U.S. Army
August 14th, 2013
03:17 AM ET

Some sailors dead after India submarine blast

An unspecified number of Indian sailors have died after an explosion and fire on a navy submarine at a dockyard in Mumbai, authorities said Wednesday.

Rescue efforts are under way at the scene following the explosion and "major fire" early Wednesday on the INS Sindhurakshak, the defense ministry said in a statement.

Defense Minister A.K. Antony later said that some officers had lost their lives, but he didn't give any details on how many had died.

FULL STORY
August 12th, 2013
05:49 AM ET

India unveils home-built aircraft carrier

India launched a 37,500-ton indigenous aircraft carrier Monday in its bid to join a select group of nations capable of building such warships.

The carrier INS Vikrant, meaning courageous, was unveiled at a shipyard in Kochi in southern India, defense ministry spokesman Sitanshu Kar told CNN.

FULL STORY
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Filed under: India • Military
August 6th, 2013
02:23 AM ET

Body found at site of U.S. chopper crash

Authorities have suspended their search for a missing crew member of a U.S. military helicopter that crashed in Okinawa after human remains were found at the site.
The helicopter crashed Monday at Camp Hansen, a Marine base on the Japanese island.

FULL STORY
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Filed under: Japan • Military • U.S. • World
May 8th, 2013
03:53 PM ET

17 stripped of authority to launch nuclear missiles

In an unprecedented action, an Air Force commander has stripped 17 of his officers of their authority to control and launch nuclear missiles.

The 17 are being sent to undergo 60 to 90 days of intensive refresher training on how to do their jobs. The action comes after their unit performed poorly on an inspection and one officer was investigated for potential compromise of nuclear launch codes, according to Lt. Col. John Dorrian, an Air Force spokesman.

The story was first reported by The Associated Press.

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Filed under: Military • U.S. Air Force
U.S. military plane crashes in Kyrgyzstan
A KC-135 tanker flies over Chicago in 2004.
May 3rd, 2013
02:55 PM ET

U.S. military plane crashes in Kyrgyzstan

An American military refueling plane took off and crashed in Kyrgyzstan on Friday, Kyrgyz and U.S. officials said.

Three people were on board, said Bolot Sharshenaliev of the Kyrgyz Emergencies Ministry. A ministry spokeswoman had previously said there were five. The U.S. military didn't give the number of those on the plane and said "the status of the crew is unknown."

The plane was a U.S. Air Force KC-135 tanker aircraft, according to the U.S. 376th Air Expeditionary Wing Public Affairs Transit Center at Manas, near Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan. The crew and aircraft are assigned to the transit center.

FULL STORY
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Filed under: Kyrgyzstan • Military
May 29 court-martial for Hassan
May 1st, 2013
07:56 PM ET

May 29 court-martial for Hassan

A military judge on Wednesday set a May 29 court-martial for U.S. Army Maj. Nidal Hasan, who is charged in a shooting rampage at Fort Hood, Texas, in November 2009 that left 13 people dead.

Hasan is charged with multiple counts of murder and attempted murder charges for the alleged shootings at the post's processing center, where soldiers were preparing to deploy to Afghanistan and Iraq.

Hasan's court-martial has been repeatedly delayed since it was initially set to begin in March 2012, most notably after an appeals court delayed the case over the question of whether the Army major's beard could be forcibly shaved.

FULL STORY
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Filed under: Military • Texas • U.S. Army
North Korea shuns Seoul offer for talks
April 26th, 2013
04:52 AM ET

North Korea shuns Seoul offer for talks

North Korea on Friday shunned a South Korean proposal for talks over the two countries' joint manufacturing zone, where Pyongyang halted activity this month amid tensions.

In a statement on state media, a spokesman for the North's National Defense Commission described Seoul's offer of talks about the Kaesong Industrial Complex as "deceptive."

The complex, which is on the North's side of the border but houses the operations of more than 120 South Korean companies, is seen as the last major symbol of cooperation between the two countries.

FULL STORY
April 15th, 2013
01:54 PM ET

Reward offered year after soldier's disappearance

It's been one year since Fort Bragg soldier Kelli Bordeaux went missing, and there's now a reward being offered for information that could help authorities solve the mystery, according to police in Fayetteville, North Carolina.

The military is offering $25,000 for information that could help explain what happened to Pfc. Bordeaux, Detective Jeff Locklear told CNN on Monday.

Last April, police and the military searched an area near a Fayetteville bar where Bordeaux was last seen and last used her cell phone, authorities then told CNN.

The 23-year-old soldier left the Froggy Bottoms bar early on a Saturday, police told CNN then. She had been drinking and was given a ride home by a bar employee, according to a U.S. Army official who spoke on condition of anonymity at the time of that story.

FULL STORY
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Filed under: Military • North Carolina • U.S. Army
April 9th, 2013
07:24 AM ET

Two killed in Afghanistan helicopter crash

Two coalition service members died following a helicopter crash in eastern Afghanistan on Tuesday, NATO's International Security Assistance Force said.

ISAF didn't release the service members' nationalities or the precise location of the crash.

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Filed under: Afghanistan • Military • NATO
Seoul thinks Kim may test a missile this week
April 7th, 2013
04:15 AM ET

Seoul thinks Kim may test a missile this week

South Korea's government said Sunday it believes North Korea may test a missile around April 10, citing as an indicator Pyongyang's push for workers to leave the Kaesong Industrial Complex by then.

Seoul "is on military readiness posture," said South Korea's Blue House spokeswoman Kim Haeng in a briefing. She said national security chief Kim Jang-soo also based the assessment on North Korea's hint to foreign diplomats in Pyongyang to send personnel out of the country.

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Filed under: District of Columbia • Kim Jong Un • Military • National security • North Korea • Pentagon • Security • South Korea • U.S. • Uncategorized • War • World • World Update
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