Harry Reid released from hospital after vehicle crash
Sen. Harry Reid was evaluated at a hospital after a vehicle collision on Interstate 15 in Las Vegas , his office says.
October 26th, 2012
07:05 PM ET

Harry Reid released from hospital after vehicle crash

[Updated at 7:05 p.m. ET] Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nevada, was discharged late Friday afternoon from a Las Vegas hospital hours after suffering rib and hip bruises in a vehicle collision on a Nevada highway, his office and a hospital spokeswoman said.

The vehicle that Reid was in, one of four vehicles in a caravan going north on Interstate 15, was involved in the multi-vehicle crash around 1 p.m. PT, Nevada Highway Patrol spokesmen Loy Hixson said.

Reid was discharged from University Medical Center shortly before around 4 p.m. PT (7 p.m. ET), hospital spokeswoman Karen Gordon said. For more, check out this story from CNN.com's Political Ticker.

Comments: Are Reid's tax allegations smart move or abuse of congressional power?
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid says Mitt Romney went 10 years without paying taxes, and readers are talking about him.
August 7th, 2012
10:10 PM ET

Comments: Are Reid's tax allegations smart move or abuse of congressional power?

Editor's note: We're listening to you. Every day, we spot thought-provoking comments from readers. What follows is a look at some of the most talked-about stories of the day.

Politics took the reigns of Tuesday's fiery commenting discussions, followed by further debate over Mars exploration and a hard look at the influence of white supremacy groups in the United States. Here's the rundown.

1. Harry Reid vs. Mitt Romney 
2. The big Mars rover question: Is it all necessary? 
3. White supremacy groups 
4. Lupe Fiasco gets heated response 
5. Olympics update: Golden girls, dubious excuses

1. Harry Reid vs. Mitt Romney

This story generated more than 10,000 comments today, dominating conversation on the site. Republican sources say they're in a Catch-22 situation on how to reply to Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid's claims that GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney went 10 years without paying taxes. They either play along with Reid and keep the conversation going, or they refuse to participate and risk rousing suspicions. Some of our readers say this situation is justified, especially after all the requests for President Barack Obama's birth certificate, while some other readers say they think Reid is playing dirty with Romney to harm his candidacy.

Reid puts GOP in a bind over Romney's taxes

What's Reid really thinking?

NoGasBags: "Harry's a genius. The only way for this issue to die down is for Romney to release the returns and disprove him. There's obviously something in there. Romney's too smart to evade taxes, but by some form of manipulation he may have avoided paying them for several years. I'd say keep the issue going. It's one more issue of secrecy in regards Romney, his ideas, plans and faith. Go too it Harry!"

oddjob3422: "A genius indeed. The move might be politically effective, but it's just another example showing how Harry Reid is the biggest embarrassment in our entire government. The man is absolutely reprehensible to abuse his power as Senate majority leader to hawk his unsubstantiated claims. Doubtless there is someone else pulling the strings, though, because Reid can hardly put together a sentence on his own. To watch the man talk on the Sunday morning political shows is to cringe in embarrassment. I didn't see the footage of his asinine Senate floor screed, but I have little doubt that he was, as usual, looking down at a cue card, slowly and haltingly sounding out words written by others. This is what we are down to – outright slander being tolerated, and the U.S. Senate floor being used as the vehicle to spread it."

Who's hunting who? FULL POST

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Filed under: Comments • Crime • Harry Reid • Mitt Romney • Politics • Race • Taxes • Wisconsin
Debt debate: Where things stand
Speaker John Boehner gives the thumbs-up Friday after the House voted 218-210 to approve his debt-ceiling measure.
July 30th, 2011
10:28 PM ET

Debt debate: Where things stand

The federal government has three days left to raise the nation's current $14.3 trillion debt ceiling, the Treasury Department said. Failure to do so will risk an unprecedented national default.

If the debt ceiling is not raised by Tuesday, Americans could face rising interest rates and a declining dollar, among other problems.

As the cost of borrowing rises, individual mortgages, car loans and student loans could become significantly more expensive. Some financial experts have warned of a downgrade of America's triple-A credit rating and a potential stock market crash.

Without an increase in the debt limit, the federal government will not be able to pay all of its bills next month. President Barack Obama recently indicated he can't guarantee Social Security checks will be mailed out on time. Other critical government programs could be endangered as well.

Where do things stand in the fight to raise the debt ceiling?

Senate

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nevada, temporarily stopped legislative consideration of his debt ceiling proposal late Saturday night, reversing an earlier decision to hold a key procedural vote on the measure by 1 a.m. ET Sunday.

Negotiations were still underway at the White House, Reid said. The vote will now be held at 1 p.m. ET on Sunday.

There are "many elements to be finalized" and still "a distance to go," Reid said. "We should give everyone as much room as possible to do their work."

The announcement comes a few hours after Reid denied claims from House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, that progress was being made on a debt ceiling deal.

The Republicans "refuse to negotiate in good faith," Reid said. "The process has not been moved forward during this day."

The Democratic-led Senate on Friday blocked the Boehner plan from being considered, voting 59-41 to table the measure.

Under an amended version, it would reduce federal deficits over the next decade by $2.4 trillion while raising the debt ceiling by a similar amount meeting the GOP's demand that total savings should at least equal any total debt ceiling hike.

Roughly $1 trillion in the savings are based on the planned U.S. withdrawals from military engagements in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Reid's plan also would establish a congressional committee made up of 12 House and Senate members to consider additional options for debt reduction. The committee's proposals would be guaranteed a Senate vote with no amendments by the end of this year.

In addition, it incorporates a process proposed by Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Kentucky, that would give Obama the authority to raise the debt ceiling in two steps while providing Congress the opportunity to vote its disapproval.

House

House Speaker John Boehner expressed optimism Saturday that an agreement is near, despite the House's rejection of a plan proposed by Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid.

"In spite of our differences, we're dealing with reasonable, responsible people," Boehner said.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Kentucky, also said Saturday afternoon that he had talked to President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden "within the last hour" and is "confident and optimistic" that there will be an "agreement within the very near future."

Earlier Saturday, the Republican-controlled House of Representatives rejected Reid's proposed debt ceiling plan in a sharply polarized 173-246 vote. Republicans unanimously opposed the measure while most Democrats backed it. GOP leaders conducted the vote on Reid's bill under rules requiring a two-thirds majority for passage, thereby ensuring its defeat.

The Republican-controlled House on Friday passed a proposal put forward by House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, that seeks to raise the debt ceiling and cut government spending while requiring that Congress pass a balanced-budget amendment to the U.S. Constitution. The 218-210 vote was strictly on party lines. The vote had been scheduled to occur Thursday night, but Republican leaders postponed it because they lacked support within their own caucus to get it passed. After the House vote, the measure went to the Senate, where Democrats blocked it from being considered.

Boehner's plan calls for $917 billion in savings over the next decade, while creating a special congressional committee to recommend additional savings of $1.6 trillion or more. It would allow the debt ceiling to be increased by a total of roughly $2.5 trillion through two separate votes. The $2.5 trillion total would be enough to fund the federal government through the end of 2012.

The plan originally called for a congressional vote on a balanced-budget amendment to the Constitution by the end of the year. Boehner then reached out to disgruntled conservatives by amending the plan to require congressional passage of such an amendment as a condition for raising the debt limit by the full $2.5 trillion.

President Obama

Obama has endorsed Reid's plan and threatened a veto of Boehner's plan. The president strongly opposes any bill that doesn't raise the debt ceiling through the 2012 election, and he has promised to veto any short-term debt ceiling extension unless it paves the way for a "grand bargain" of more sweeping reforms and revenue increases.

On Friday, Obama urged Senate Democrats and Republicans to take the lead in congressional negotiations. He said the House GOP plan "has no chance of becoming law." Obama also urged Americans to keep contacting members of Congress in order "to keep the pressure on Washington."

The president made a nationally televised plea for compromise Monday night, though he also criticized Republicans for opposing any tax hikes on the wealthy.

No face-to-face negotiations are currently scheduled for Saturday.

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Filed under: Barack Obama • Harry Reid • John Boehner • Politics
iReporters weigh in on debt crisis
iReporter Bill Dalton says he sides with the Republican plan that was pushed through the House and defeated in the Senate.
July 30th, 2011
06:43 PM ET

iReporters weigh in on debt crisis

The "debt ceiling" battle is being fought not just in Washington, but all around the United States as people debate on how best to resolve the issue and who is to blame for the crisis.

Many of these people have submitted their thoughts about the topic to CNN in recent days through iReport. Some - be they military personnel, small business owners fearful of tax increases, or people receiving entitlement benefits - called for action as they spoke of the personal impact of failing to reach a resolution.

Others echoed Democratic and Republican leaders' talking points. In the former case, that includes possible revenue hikes  and insisting that the debate shouldn't be renewed next year, and in the latter by insisting on no tax increase and movement on a balanced budget amendment that would mandate the nation balance its books.

Below is a sampling of recent iReporters' comments, as the U.S. government creeps closer to an August 2 deadline to raise the $14.3 trillion debt ceiling or default on its debt.

FULL POST

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Filed under: Barack Obama • Budget • Economy • Harry Reid • John Boehner • Politics • Taxes
November 3rd, 2010
10:24 AM ET

On the Radar: 2012, jobs and mailing terror

Road to 2012 Wednesday belongs to Republicans. The GOP knocked Democrats out of at least 10 governorships on Tuesday and grabbed the majority in the House by winning at least 60 seats. That means John Boehner is likely to be the next speaker of the House, and President Obama called to congratulate him. Democrats held on to power in the Senate, with Sen. Harry Reid of Nevada beating Tea Party-backed candidate Sharron Angle. The day brought victory for some other Tea Party-backed candidates, but the winning group did not include Christine O'Donnell, who lost to Democrat Chris Coons in the contest for the Senate seat vacated by Vice President Joe Biden.

But what everyone is really talking about is two years away. The race to 2012 begins today.

Jobs – The victorious vibes are already transitioning into pressure to deliver. Voters are concerned about the economy, and the burden is on those elected Tuesday to deal with it. According to the outplacement firm Challenger, Gray and Christmas, employers announced nearly 38,000 job cuts last month. In a separate report, payroll processor ADP says private-sector jobs increased by 43,000 in October. Economists are predicting steady growth, which could improve Obama's chances of holding onto his job.

Shipping and terror – With the new focus on safety in package shipments, Greece suspended air shipments of all mail and packages for 48 hours due to parcel bombs mailed from Athens this week. Packages were sent on Tuesday to the leaders of Germany and Italy. At least nine other bombs were sent to embassies in Athens. Authorities in Europe are scrambling to safeguard the public. One aviation chief is calling for a complete security overhaul within the industry.

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Filed under: Barack Obama • Delaware • Democratic Party • Germany • Greece • Harry Reid • Italy • John Boehner • National security • Nevada • Politics • Republican Party • Tea Party
November 3rd, 2010
12:41 AM ET

Harry Reid defeats Sharron Angle in Nevada Senate race

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid has defeated Tea Party-backed Republican nominee Sharron Angle in Nevada's Senate race, CNN projects. Projections are based on CNN analysis of exit poll data.

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Filed under: Elections • Harry Reid • Nevada • Politics
October 5th, 2010
09:49 AM ET

Scott Ashjian: Spoiler in the Nevada Senate race?

Sharron Angle was allegedly taped asking candidate Scott Ashjian to drop out of the race.

A secret audio tape is shaking up a close Senate race in Nevada, where House Majority Leader Harry Reid is running against Sharron Angle.

On a recording made by third party Tea Party candidate Scott Ashjian, Angle is on tape trying to persuade Ashjian to drop out of the race and throw his support behind her.

While Ashjian is no direct competition for Angle, according to the latest CNN polling, Ashjian is getting about 5 percent of the vote - enough to steal away votes from Sharron Angle and give Harry Reid just enough of a margin for a win.

FULL POST

September 21st, 2010
11:44 AM ET

Student's 'DREAM,' last hope rests on Senate vote

Yahaira Carrillo and other students take part in news conference promoting the Dream Act.

When Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid said he would be introducing the DREAM Act and a “don’t ask, don’t tell” repeal as amendments to the defense authorization bill it sent shockwaves through political and immigration circles. Before those two additions can be voted on, the Senate must agree to close debate on the larger defense bill - something that may not happen.

GOP senators, in addition to frustrations with the possible “don’t ask, don’t tell” repeal, also dislike Reid's plan to add the DREAM act, an immigration-related provision to the defense bill.

The DREAM Act would create a path to citizenship for illegal immigrants who entered the United States as children. Under the bill, an individual would have to be of “good moral character” and either receive a college degree or complete at least two years of U.S. military service. Yahaira Carrillo is a college student who, while in high school, participated in Jr. ROTC, while dreaming of becoming a United States Marine.

“I wanted to be in uniform,” she told CNN, but she quit ROTC when a Captain-classmate warned that her undocumented status would bar her from joining the Marines.

The 25-year-old college senior is currently in deportation proceedings, but if the Dream Act became law she could earn U.S. citizenship.

“This is where I want to be.” Carrillo told CNN’s Dick Uliano. “I want to be here. I don’t want to be anywhere else.”

Listen to Carillo's story here:


Or you can also listen to the CNN Radio Reports' podcast on iTunes or subscribe to the podcast here.

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Filed under: Harry Reid • Immigration • Politics
April 26th, 2010
09:31 AM ET

On the Radar: Twister damage, financial reform, H1N1

Morgan Hayden digs through her belongings after a tornado hit in Yazoo City, Mississippi.

Mississippi tornado Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour plans to ask for a federal disaster declaration after a tornado hit over the weekend. Massive cleanup efforts are under way after the tornado tore through towns, killing at least 11 people 10 in Mississippi and leaving a swath of devastation across several states, including Alabama and Louisiana.

Financial reform showdown Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nevada, has scheduled a vote at 5 p.m. ET Monday to move ahead with the Senate's version of a financial reform bill. But Republicans say they still don't have a bipartisan compromise yet and they'll try to delay things until they do.

FULL POST

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Filed under: Finance • Harry Reid • Health • Politics • U.S. • Weather
March 26th, 2010
09:21 AM ET

On the Radar: Violence against Congress, McCain-Palin, Iraq

A giant cross overshadows St. Peters Square at the Vatican on March 25.

Here’s a look at some of the stories CNN.com reporters are working on Friday:

Church Abuse - We follow the global story of Catholic church abuse with the reactions around the world from several archbishops and stories looking at how much the Vatican knew about the alleged abuse and when. Friday the Catholic Archdiocese in Munich, Germany, denied a report that the Pope knew a priest convicted of abusing minors was back at work. On the same day, French bishops wrote a letter saying they felt "shame and regret for the abominable acts" by some priests in the Catholic church. The Catholic Archbishop of Westminster called the child abuse committed within the church "totally unacceptable" and said he was ashamed of what happened.

McCain and Palin on the trail again - Sen. John McCain is running for re-election and for the first time in nearly 20 years is facing a tough challenge from J.D. Hayworth. When he hits the campaign trail this weekend, there will be a familiar face alongside him - Sarah Palin.  The pair will be at an event in Tucson, Arizona, at 3:30 p.m. on Friday.

FULL POST

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Filed under: Church Abuse • Harry Reid • Iraq • John McCain • On the Radar • Politics • Sarah Palin • Vatican • World
March 12th, 2010
05:59 PM ET

Reid's wife undergoes neck surgery after wreck

The wife of Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid underwent neck surgery Friday after being injured with their daughter in a four-vehicle wreck in suburban Washington a day earlier, her surgeon said.

Since the surgery, Landra Reid, 69, has been able "to get out of bed, her pain is well-controlled and she's able to swallow some," said Dr. Elizabeth Franco of Inova Fairfax Hospital.

FULL POST


Filed under: Harry Reid • Politics