Full text of Rick Santorum e-mail endorsing Romney
May 8th, 2012
09:23 AM ET

Full text of Rick Santorum e-mail endorsing Romney

Rick Santorum told supporters in an e-mail Monday he was endorsing his one-time rival for the GOP presidential nomination Mitt Romney.

Below is the full text of the e-mail Santorum sent out:

Friends,

Thank you again for all you did as one of my strongest and committed supporters. Your belief in our campaign helped us start a movement of Americans who believe deeply that our best days are ahead as long as we fight to strengthen our families, unshackle our economy and promote freedom here and around the world. Karen and I will be forever grateful for the support, kindness and commitment you showed us, as well as our children, over these last months.

On Friday, Governor Romney came to Pittsburgh for an over-hour long one-on-one meeting. The conversation was candid, collegial and focused on the issues that you helped me give voice to during our campaign; because I believe they are essential ingredients to not only winning this fall, but turning our country around.

While the issue of my endorsement did not come up, I certainly have heard from many of you who have weighed in on whether or not I should issue a formal endorsement. Thank you for your counsel, it has been most helpful. However, I felt that it was completely impossible for me to even consider an endorsement until after a meeting to discuss issues critical to those of us who often feel our voices are not heard by the establishment: social conservatives, tea-party supporters, lower and middle income working families.

Clearly without the overwhelming support from you all, I never would have won 11 states and over 3 million votes, and we would not have won more counties than all the other candidates combined. I can assure you that even though I am no longer a candidate for president, I will still continue to fight every day for our shared values – the values that made America the greatest country in the history of the world.

During our meeting I felt a deep responsibility to assess Governor Romney's commitment to addressing the issues most important to conservatives, as well his commitment to ensuring our appropriate representation in a Romney administration.

The family and its foundational role in America's economic success, a central point of our campaign, was discussed at length. I was impressed with the Governor's deep understanding of this connection and his commitment to economic policies that preserve and strengthen families. He clearly understands that having pro-family initiatives are not only the morally and economically right thing to do, but that the family is the basic building block of our society and must be preserved.

FULL POST

Overheard on CNN.com: Can public, private life coexist? Santorum suspends campaign
Rick Santorum had been Mitt Romney's closest rival but still had less than half of his delegate total.
April 10th, 2012
03:26 PM ET

Overheard on CNN.com: Can public, private life coexist? Santorum suspends campaign

Editor's note: This post is part of the Overheard on CNN.com series, a regular feature that examines interesting comments and thought-provoking conversations posted by the community.

Rick Santorum suspended his campaign for the Republican presidential nomination Tuesday. This gives Mitt Romney fewer obstacles toward becoming the GOP nominee. Readers talked about the Republican horse race and about the occasional conflict between family demands, as in the case of Santorum's daughter, and a highly public life.

Santorum to suspend campaign, sources say

This reader said they believe Santorum is making the right decision for his family.

Matt Dotseth: "One has to wonder why Santorum is running. Like Sarah Palin, he has a special needs child. This makes it quite challenging for him to ever be able to focus 100% on the campaign, and probably being president. I for one think he should stick to his family, and take care of his daughter, and that's not because I completely disagree with his politics. For a 'family values' guy, isn't a family value taking care of your sick child, and putting that child before your own wants and needs?"

Some were happy to shift the focus to Mitt Romney. Some were not.

starspangled: "Now we all can finally rally behind our candidate and future President of the United States of America, Mitt Romney. The focus can finally be placed on obama who is dismantling our economy and turning this nation into something unrecognizable."

AlanThinks: "What do you live on? Sure isn't the same I live. Obama dismantled the economy? The last I heard the Republicans deregulated everything, robbed the bank and we are still digging out from it."

One reader was concerned about the implications for health care in America. FULL POST

Santorum suspends presidential campaign
April 10th, 2012
02:13 PM ET

Santorum suspends presidential campaign

[Updated at 2:40 p.m. ET] Rick Santorum suspended his campaign for the Republican presidential nomination on Tuesday.

[Posted at 2:13 p.m. ET] Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum will announce he will suspend his campaign on Tuesday at an event in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, a senior adviser to the campaign tells CNN.

A second source told CNN that Santorum, his wife, and campaign manager held a conference call with staff Tuesday, advising them not to grow discouraged.

"We are going to stay involved and stay active in the next couple of months," Santorum said, according to the source.

READ FULL POLITICAL TICKER POST
April 5th, 2012
09:36 PM ET

CNN prime time: Kid-free zones on planes, 'nothing left' for Santorum

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Specter: No point in Santorum continuing

Arlen Specter is mincing no words when it comes to whether or not Santorum should throw in the towel.

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Flights with a no-child zone

When it comes to kids on airplanes, don't get Richard Quest started.

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Swain: 'Hoodies feed into stereotype'

Boyce Watkins and Carol Swain argue the aspect of race in the Martin case and the movement to boycott Sanford, Florida.

March 26th, 2012
10:34 PM ET

CNN prime time: Santorum gets feisty, Obama gets caught

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Romney reacts to Obama open mic gaffe

GOP candidate Mitt Romney wasted no time attacking Obama's now-controversial "open-mic" comment with Russia's leader.

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Santorum explains bulls*** remark

GOP presidential candidate Rick Santorum tells CNN's Wolf Blitzer why he lashed out at a New York Times reporter.

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Khan: 'We're sick and tired'

Chaka Khan talks to Piers Morgan about the Trayvon Martin case.

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Filed under: Barack Obama • CNN Prime Time • Politics • Rick Santorum • Russia • Trayvon Martin
March 7th, 2012
01:58 PM ET

Overheard on CNN.com: Will GOP voters accept Romney? Does it matter?

Editor's note: This post is part of the Overheard on CNN.com series, a regular feature that examines interesting comments and thought-provoking conversations posted by the community.

Mitt Romney came out ahead on Super Tuesday, but plenty of Republicans voted for Rick Santorum instead, and Georgia went for Newt Gingrich by a decisive margin. The morning after, readers are exploring two questions. First, why haven't GOP voters fully embraced Romney? Second, does this apparent conflict actually mean anything in the long run?

Analysis: In key Romney win, some warning signs remain

One reader offered this theory:

chadpv: "Republicans' main focus is who can beat Obama in November. That's what is driving votes. But Republicans are not confident that Romney (or any candidate in the run) can beat Obama; they just think if someone can squeeze a win, it will be Romney. That is why he cannot really 'seal the deal' as fast as most Republican primaries. That is also why the field is very weak, Anyone who has wide appeal with the Republicans will wait four more years when there is not an incumbent running and their chances are better to win."

Doucher: "And this is one of many problems with the two-party system; they want to beat each other more than they want to give us a good candidate."

Another person said Romney doesn't need to worry too much.

GoPSULions: "The ultra conservatives that are not now voting for Romney will vote for whoever wins the nomination rather than vote for Obama. So this is why Romney is not concerned about their votes in the primaries. He is focused on staying more to the middle so he can potentially win the swing states and voters that are not locked to voting straight party lines."

Of course, several other readers disagreed. FULL POST

Romney, Santorum: Their war of words with themselves
On the campaign trail, Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum have both made comments providing a field day for their critics.
March 2nd, 2012
12:57 PM ET

Romney, Santorum: Their war of words with themselves

Both Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum have suffered self-inflicted wounds while campaigning for the Republican presidential nomination.

For Romney, it has been comments that play into the stereotype he’s an elitist, out of touch with the common Joe, or not a committed conservative.

For Santorum, his long-held, far-right positions on social issues may make it difficult for him to sway independents and disaffected Democrats that he would need to win the general election.

Here’s a look at their greatest, er, hits:

Romney: ‘I have some great friends who are NASCAR team owners’

During a stop at the Daytona 500, Romney was asked if he was a fan of the popular sport. Romney told an Associated Press sports reporter that he was kind of “but I have some great friends who are NASCAR team owners.”

Romney: ‘A couple of Cadillacs’

During a speech in the nation’s automotive capital before the Michigan primary, Romney casually told the Detroit Economic Club that he drove a Mustang and a Chevrolet pickup and his wife, Ann, drove “a couple of Cadillacs” (one at each of their two homes) as he tried to show his family’s commitment to buying American cars.

FULL POST

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Filed under: Elections • Mitt Romney • Politics • Rick Santorum
Overheard on CNN.com: Readers debate open primaries after Michigan mischief, robo calls
What do you think about the GOP primaries thus far and the candidates' campaigning tactics?
February 29th, 2012
05:01 PM ET

Overheard on CNN.com: Readers debate open primaries after Michigan mischief, robo calls

Editor's note: This post is part of the Overheard on CNN.com series, a regular feature that examines interesting comments and thought-provoking conversations posted by the community.

Readers are talking about the tactics of Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum after the Michigan and Arizona primaries. Meanwhile, Democrats have been explaining some mischief as well. Readers compared the candidates and debated open vs. closed primaries.

Santorum flips on Dems voting in GOP primaries

Santorum's robo call encouraging Democrats to vote for him as a hit against Romney drew lots of ire.

Dan J: "Had it been a general election-style robo call, where Santorum highlighted his strengths and why he should be president (not just the Republican nominee), then it can be defended as attempting to attract all Americans, not just Republicans. That's fine. It wasn't that. Not even close. That makes him a hypocritical sellout sleazebag that clearly puts self before party, and self before country."

Another reader came to Santorum's defense.

CBS: "Santorum is asking Democrats who do not intend to vote for Obama (do you think there might be a few of those?) to become Republican and choose their candidate. He is not asking them to vote Republican so they can choose the weaker candidate so Obama has a better chance."

But some said Romney can't play innocent. FULL POST

February 24th, 2012
09:13 PM ET

CNN prime time: Revealing Palin e-mails, fake Denny's boss helps himself

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Palin e-mail mentions divorce

“I can’t afford this job,” says Sarah Palin in newly-released e-mails that reveal frustration over legal costs and bring the health of her marriage into question.

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Santorum: Romney on wrong team

Rick Santorum escalates his rhetoric, accusing Mitt Romney of false attacks and playing for the wrong team.

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Fake Denny's boss cooks himself a burger

Talk about fake it ‘til you make it. A guy walks into a Denny’s, claims he’s the new boss, goes to the kitchen and cooks himself a burger and fries.

February 23rd, 2012
01:40 AM ET

Truth Squad: Fact checking Wednesday's debate

CNN examines statements made by Republican presidential candidates during Wednesday night's CNN/Republican Party of Arizona debate in Mesa, Arizona.

Newt Gingrich criticized the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff for characterizing Iran as a "rational actor" in international affairs and defending the possibility of preventing an Israeli attack on Iranian nuclear sites

 The statement: "The fact is this is a dictator, Ahmadinejad, who has said he doesn't believe the Holocaust existed. This is a dictator who said he wants to eliminate Israel from the face of the Earth. This is a dictator who said he wants to drive the United States out of the Middle East. I'm inclined to believe dictators ... If you think a madman is about to have nuclear weapons, and you think that madman is going to use those nuclear weapons, then you have an absolute moral obligation to defend the lives of your people by eliminating the capacity to get nuclear weapons." FULL POST

Overheard on CNN.com: Santorum's views stir debate about women's roles
Readers are debating the views of Sen. Rick Santorum as the GOP presidential race presses on.
February 14th, 2012
08:19 PM ET

Overheard on CNN.com: Santorum's views stir debate about women's roles

Editor's note: This post is part of the Overheard on CNN.com series, a regular feature that examines interesting comments and thought-provoking conversations posted by the community.

Writer Stephanie Coontz posits that presidential candidate Sen. Rick Santorum's views about women come straight from the ultra-olden days in an opinion article on CNN.com on Tuesday. Her story got thousands of comments.

Santorum's stone-age view of women

The most-liked comment was about women's rights and ambitions, which many of our readers said could be in danger under a conservative president.

abcdef54321: "Conservative women make me sorry that American liberals worked so hard for so long to give women the vote, to allow them to own property, to allow them to wear pants, to give them equal pay, to protect them from sexual harassment at work, to give them access to abortions, to allow them to use birth control, to encourage them to seek advanced education, and to allow them to serve in the military. Conservative women vote every November for men who would pay them less than men, outlaw abortion, outlaw birth control, perhaps outlaw divorce, repeal child nutrition programs, repeal child health programs, repeal laws protecting them from sexual harassment, make it harder for them to get a college degree, and close public schools. Go figure."

But then, here's what a reader identifying as one of those conservative women had to say:

not1not99: "Well, I was an American liberal and I am now an American conservative. I am college-educated, I have a good job, I've never been on welfare and my husband loves me as Christ loves the church. I am not oppressed, beaten, ignorant, or chained to the kitchen (actually I love to cook!). I have my own ideas, thoughts, and opinions that are not my husband's but conclusions based on facts that I research on my own. The people I associate with are other college-educated moms who have made the choice to stay home, raise and educate their children instead of leaving that responsibility in someone else's hands (public school system, day care). They respect my choices, I respect their choices. However, in retrospect I would have rather have stayed home, and raised and educated my children.

"Our choice is our choice. Not out of ignorance or some distorted or perverse sense of 'obedience to our husbands.' Husbands that choose to dominate their wives come from all sorts of different backgrounds, conservative and liberal. So stop being childish, pointing fingers and playing silly stereotyping games."

Several commenters talked about the many difficult challenges involved in staying home with the kids.

FULL POST

Overheard on CNN.com: Santorum shakes up GOP race, but will he last?
Rick Santorum's mix of fury and folksy is working for him, says Timothy Stanley.
February 8th, 2012
01:00 PM ET

Overheard on CNN.com: Santorum shakes up GOP race, but will he last?

Editor's note: This post is part of the Overheard on CNN.com series, a regular feature that examines interesting comments and thought-provoking conversations posted by the community.

Rick Santorum was thrice victorious in Tuesday's GOP contests, leading some to wonder if he's gaining momentum. Some, like opinion writer Timothy Stanley, are wondering what real impact he will have. Is Santorum the "coulda, shoulda, woulda" candidate, as Stanley asserts?

Santorum, the 'coulda, shoulda, woulda' candidate

We heard from a few Santorum supporters, who said they believe the candidate could be a good option for Republicans.

AngelThree: "He is looking better each primary. He is a devoted family man who appears to have no skeletons in his closet. He is a devout Christian who puts family first. He is a moderate who is not aggressive militarily. He truly cares about our country. He also seems to have a bit of that Kennedy mystique about him that will attract the independent voters. He does not attack the other candidates. Like all humans, he will have faults, but they seem minimal as opposed to the other candidates or the incumbent. I believe he has a chance to serve."

This reader didn't think Santorum's success over Mitt Romney, Ron Paul and Newt Gingrich would carry over in other places.

Evilchicken: "Of course the surge isn't real. States like Colorado, Missouri and Minnesota do not reflect popular opinion anywhere outside of the Midwest. Romney will win ... sadly."

There were quite a few comments from those who are not fans of Santorum, as evidenced by this comment addressed to Stanley. It was the most-liked response.

angie412: "A professor at Oxford, huh? Do you study past speeches of candidates, sir? Mr. I-Want-to-Ban-All-Abortions and Amend-the-Constitution-to-Suit-My-Own-Personal-Religious-Beliefs is the most frightening candidate I've ever seen. I can't believe, given his terrible track record of crazy, that you'd even suggest he's an appropriate candidate in any party for the President of the United States. I'd vote Bush in for a third term before I'd vote for Santorum!"

Some of the posts were about a dissatisfaction with the choices available for Election 2012. FULL POST

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Filed under: Colorado • Elections • Minnesota • Missouri • Overheard on CNN.com • Politics • Republican Party • Rick Santorum • U.S.
Overheard on CNN.com: Feisty Florida debate chock full of memorable moments
Newt Gingrich and Mitt Romney sparred during Thursday night's Florida GOP debate.
January 27th, 2012
03:06 PM ET

Overheard on CNN.com: Feisty Florida debate chock full of memorable moments

Editor's note: This post is part of the Overheard on CNN.com series, a regular feature that examines interesting comments and thought-provoking conversations posted by the community.

Quite a debate was had on Thursday night ahead of the Florida GOP primary. Candidates sparred over a variety of issues, and the conversation was spirited both on stage and in our comments section.

On Romney's apparent air of dominance: Romney beats Gingrich at his own game

We saw our readers giving more praise for Mitt Romney after this debate than we have seen after other such events.

Phange: "Romney very clearly did what needed to be done yesterday. Not only did he make Newt look disheveled and decisively off-kilter, he presented himself as pragmatic and intellectual. With this being the last debate before the Florida primary, I think it's highly unlikely that Newt can recover in time to win the state."

sdpianomom: "One of my favorite moments; Romney praises his wife for her strength in battling cancer and MS. Then there's Gingrich, standing next to him, who cheated on his wives while they were battling those very same diseases."

Not everyone was buying what Romney was saying. FULL POST

January 27th, 2012
04:32 AM ET

Truth Squad: Fact checking Thursday's debate

CNN examines statements by Republican presidential candidates during Thursday night's CNN/Republican Party of Florida debate in Jacksonville, Florida.

Mitt Romney and Newt Gingrich both accused each other of having financial interests in Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac

The statements: "We discovered, to our shock, Gov. Romney owns shares of both Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Governor Romney made $1 million off of selling some of that. Governor Romney has an investment in Goldman Sachs, which is, today, foreclosing on Floridians." - Gingrich

"First of all, my investments are not made by me. My investments, for the last 10 years, have been in a blind trust, managed by a trustee. Secondly, the investments that they have made, we learned about this as we made our financial disclosure, have been in mutual funds and bonds. I don't own stock in either Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac. There are bonds that the investor has held through mutual funds. And, Mr. Speaker, I know that sounds like an enormous revelation, but have you checked your own investments? You also have investments through mutual funds that also invest in Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac." - Romney FULL POST

Overheard on CNN.com: Romney's debating, Romney's taxes
Mitt Romney and Newt Gingrich at Monday night's GOP presidential debate in Florida.
January 24th, 2012
04:30 PM ET

Overheard on CNN.com: Romney's debating, Romney's taxes

Editor's note: This post is part of the Overheard on CNN.com series, a regular feature that examines interesting comments and thought-provoking conversations posted by the community.

On Monday, people were talking about Newt Gingrich. On Tuesday, two of the most talked-about topics on CNN.com have been Mitt Romney and Mitt Romney. His debating and his taxes, that is. Here's a look at these different angles on the GOP presidential candidate.

Romney does some damage

Debate coach and commentator Todd Graham took a look at Monday night's Florida GOP presidential debate and said Romney had some successes. He also gave props to candidate Ron Paul for doing well that evening. One commenter said Romney and Paul did a good job of stopping Gingrich, but some disagreed.

Maiaw: "Romney and Paul caught Newt in a bind last night. Romney said that Newt was a failed leader and had to resign in disgrace as speaker. Newt countered and said that he 'voluntarily stepped down'. Paul rebutted Newt's claim and said that is not what happened because Paul was there during the investigation and it was a 'mess being under Newt's leadership! In a previous debate, (Rick) Santorum stated the same thing since he was there; Newt did not 'voluntarily step down.' Newt just stood there all quiet after that exchange with Paul. Not a Paul fan, but that was a good exchange from him."

ljburgher: "Anyone who is not prepared will look bad during any debate. Dont just pin that on Newt. Romney has been flopping all over the place, especially on his taxes when questioned. He looks and sounds horrible."

Some readers said Romney came off badly. FULL POST

January 21st, 2012
12:20 AM ET

Iowa GOP officials declare Rick Santorum winner of Iowa caucuses

The Iowa Republican Party officially declares Rick Santorum the winner of the Iowa caucuses late Friday.

Initial returns gave Mitt Romney a eight-vote margin of victory over Santorum, giving the former Massachusetts governor a major momentum boost heading into the New Hampshire primary.

However, a recount later gave Santorum a 34-vote advantage over Romney in Iowa. The news comes as voters head to the polls Saturday for the South Carolina primary.

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Filed under: Elections • Iowa • Mitt Romney • Politics • Rick Santorum
January 20th, 2012
12:59 AM ET

Truth Squad: 4 checks on Thursday's GOP debate

CNN examines statements by Republican presidential candidates during Monday night's CNN Southern Republican Debate in Charleston, South Carolina.

Rick Santorum on President Obama's budget cuts

The statement: "We have the president of the United States who said he is going to cut veterans benefits, cut our military, at a time when these folks are four, five, six, seven tours, coming back, in and out of jobs, sacrificing everything for this country.  And the president of the United States can't cut one penny out of the social welfare system and he wants to cut a trillion dollars out of our military and hit our veterans, and that's disgusting."

FULL POST

January 19th, 2012
07:50 AM ET

Final Iowa results show Santorum with 34-vote lead

[Updated at 11:09 a.m. ET] Rick Santorum finished the Iowa Republican caucuses 34 votes ahead of Mitt Romney, but results from several precincts are missing and the full actual results may never be known, according to a final certified tally released Thursday by the Iowa GOP.

The new numbers show 29,839 votes for Santorum and 29,805 votes for Romney, according to the party.

The initial returns from Iowa gave Romney a razor-thin 8-vote margin of victory over Santorum, reinforcing the former Massachusetts governor's frontrunner status and giving him a major momentum boost heading into the New Hampshire primaries. Romney went on to win New Hampshire easily, allegedly making him the first non-incumbent Republican in modern history to win the first two contests of the cycle.

Now history is being rewritten, casting a shadow over the first-in-the-nation caucuses and potentially shaking up the GOP race two days before the critical South Carolina primary.

News of the new results is "very exciting," Santorum campaign spokesman Hogan Gidley told CNN. "The narrative for a long time has been that Mitt Romney was 2-0. ... If these results are true and Rick is ahead by 34 votes, then that's not the narrative anymore. There have been two states, two different victors."

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Filed under: Mitt Romney • Politics • Republican Party • Rick Santorum