July 27th, 2011
01:20 PM ET

Federal judge allows stem-cell research to continue

A federal judge dismissed a lawsuit Wednesday that tried to block funding of stem-cell research on human embryos.

A federal appeals court in April lifted a previous injunction on continued funding, and U.S. District Chief Judge Royce Lamberth has now agreed with the Obama administration that the lawsuit brought by two scientists should be dismissed.

The 38-page decision is a victory for supporters of federally funded testing for a range of diseases and illnesses.

The field of embryonic stem-cell research has been highly controversial, because in most cases the research process involves destroying the embryo, typically four or five days old, after removing stem cells. These cells are blank and can become any cell in the body. Because of the destruction of embryos, most opponents believe this is moral issue. Supporters of the research point to the potential for saving lives.

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Court lifts ban on federal funding for stem cell research
A federal court has lifted a ban on federal funding for stem cell research.
April 29th, 2011
11:20 AM ET

Court lifts ban on federal funding for stem cell research

A federal court has given the Obama administration the go-ahead to continue embryonic stem cell research.

The controversial 2-1 decision Friday is a victory for supporters of federally funded testing for a range of diseases and illnesses.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia lifted an injunction imposed last year by a federal judge, who said all embryonic stem cell research at the National Institutes of Health amounted to destruction of embryos, in violation of congressional spending laws.

The case is Sherley v. Sebelius (10-5287).

See CNN's full coverage of the court's stem cell research decision
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September 28th, 2010
06:19 PM ET

Temporary halt on stem-cell research lifted

Federally funded embryonic stem-cell research can continue while the Obama administration appeals a federal judge's ruling against use of public funds for such research, after an appeals court lifted a temporary injunction.

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September 7th, 2010
07:20 PM ET

Judge: No delay in ruling blocking stem-cell research funding

A federal judge Tuesday rejected the Obama administration's request to stay his recently imposed injunction against use of public funds in embryonic stem-cell research.

District Court Judge Royce Lamberth said he could not agree to delay his injunction while the case is appealed.

"Defendants (the government) are incorrect about much of their 'parade of horribles' that will supposedly result from this Court's preliminary injunction," Lamberth wrote in his court order.

The "horribles" he referred to are an extensive list of research projects outlined by the National Institutes of Health that will have to be shelved if a stay is not granted. Lamberth issued his injunction largely on the basis of agruments from scientists who said their projects would be damaged if public funds were used for embryonic stem cell research.

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August 24th, 2010
09:28 PM ET

Government will appeal stem cell funding ruling

The Obama administration will appeal a federal judge's decision to temporarily block federal funding of embryonic stem cell research, Justice Department spokesman Matthew Miller confirmed Tuesday.
An appeal is expected to be filed later this week asking the court to lift the injunction ordered Monday, according to Miller.

The ruling by U.S. District Judge Royce C. Lamberth was a blow to the Obama administration, which last year issued guidelines to allow federal funding for embryonic stem cell research.

On Tuesday, the director of the National Institutes of Health said he was stunned by Lamberth's decision to order a temporary injunction.

"This will mean very promising research will not get done, screening for new drugs will stop, and researchers who have been energized will likely grow discouraged and move to other countries or on to other research," Dr. Francis Collins told reporters.

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