November 15th, 2010
02:13 PM ET

Monday's intriguing people

Garry Trudeau

The creator of "Doonesbury" is celebrating his 40th anniversary drawing the politically and socially charged comic strip.

He is making the media rounds in support of two books being published: “40: A Doonesbury Retrospective” and “Doonesbury and the Art of G.B. Trudeau.”

The comic strip, which is more likely to appear on the op-ed page of a newspaper than in the comics section, routinely skewers those on the political landscape. Trudeau’s loyal readership has led to the strip being published in 1,500 newspapers around the world since it was first published on October 26, 1970.

Collections of his cartoons have filled almost 60 books and have sold more than 7 million total copies. His 1975 Pulitzer Prize for editorial cartooning made him the first comic strip artist to win the award.

His comic has sometimes earned him a reputation as a left-winger, but a column in The Boston Globe pointed out that Trudeau’s jabs can target anyone.

“I’ve always thought he was an equal-opportunity balloon-popper,” wrote Alex Beam. “Anybody who figured out that John Kerry was a narcissistic blowhard as a Yale undergraduate is someone who sees the world through a wide-angle lens, taking in all azimuths of social and political tomfoolery.”

Several media outlets are paying homage to Trudeau and his drawings this week. NPR is one of the few media outlets to have gotten an interview with oft-reclusive Yale graduate.

The radio network offers a condensed retrospective of Trudeau’s work as well as several anecdotes from the artist. In one, the 62-year-old recounts how he became syndicated shortly after his strip appeared on campus.

“It's a ridiculous story, and it nauseates my children,” Trudeau says, “that I would find my life's work six weeks into it.”

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September 2nd, 2010
10:29 PM ET

'Healing process' begins at Discovery Channel

There were "a lot of hugs" and "a lot of tears" among employees at Discovery Channel headquarters in Silver Spring, Maryland, on Thursday - one day after police shot and killed a man there who was holding three hostages.

"The healing process" has begun, said David Leavy, a company spokesman. "Yesterday knocked us off the horse. But we're back in the saddle today."

Leavy said the company's employees spent much of the day in a "town hall" with senior managers, and that over a dozen crisis counselors had been called in.

Wednesday's hostage crisis "was a scary situation," he said. "I don't think anyone walked into the building today with the same bounce in their step."

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Filed under: Discovery Channel • Hostages • Maryland