Deceased man’s Wimbledon bet wins $155K for Oxfam
Roger Federer's Wimbledon victory on Sunday won big cash for a charity, thanks to a British man's bet years ago.
July 10th, 2012
04:39 PM ET

Deceased man’s Wimbledon bet wins $155K for Oxfam

Nicholas Newlife has been dead for three years, but he’s just given anti-poverty charity Oxfam a sizable boost - thanks to a bet he made years ago on tennis star Roger Federer.

Newlife, of Oxfordshire, England, bet £1,520 ($2,350) at 66-1 odds that Federer would win seven Wimbledon men’s singles before 2020.

That bet became a winner on Sunday, when Federer beat Andy Murray in four sets to claim his seventh Wimbledon title.

But Newlife, of Oxfordshire, England, died in February 2009 at age 59. So instead of going to him, the £101,840 ($155,000) winnings will go to Oxfam, to which he had left his entire estate, the charity said this week.

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Filed under: Sports • Tennis • United Kingdom • Wimbledon
July 6th, 2012
09:00 PM ET

What's going on at Wimbledon this weekend

History was made on Saturday when American Serena Williams defeated Poland's Agnieszka Radwanska 6-1, 5-7, 6-2, to win the 2012 Wimbledon's women's singles final. This is Williams' seventh finals appearance for the Grand Slam tournament, and her fifth Wimbledon win.

Williams and her sister, Venus, also defeated the Czech Republic's Andrea Hlavackova and Lucie Hradecka in the women's doubles final. The sisters have five singles titles each, and now, five doubles titles.

In the men's doubles final, Briton Jonathan Marray and Denmark's Frederik Nielsen beat Sweden's Robert Lindstedt and Romania's Horia Tecau. Marray's victory gave Britain its first men's doubles champion since 1936 and according to the Wimbledon blog, Nielsen is the first Danish player to win a Grand Slam title, ever.

"Oh my God I can't even describe..." Williams said after her singles win, according to the Wimbledon live blog. "I thank Jehovah for letting me get this far. I almost didn't make it , two years ago I was in hospital... It's so worth is and I'm so happy. I never dreamt of being here again. You just never give up."

Williams was in the hospital recovering from a pulmonary embolism 18 months ago.

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Serena Williams wins 2012 Wimbledon

Serena Williams wins her 5th Wimbledon singles title, beating Agnieszka Radwanska CNN's Amanda Davies reports.

When asked if age 30 is the new 20, Williams replied, ""Oh my God, of course. Hello? I've been saying it all week: mentally I'm kind of 12, 13. I've always wanted everything Venus has had so... I had to copy you again, sorry!"

Radwanska was noticeably disappointed about losing out on her chance to snag her first Grand Slam tournament win.

"I'm still shaking so much, so I think I have the best two weeks of my life you know?" Radwanska said. "Of course she played too good today. I already have great memories from 2005 when I won junior Wimbledon. I think it was not my day today but I will just try next year and we'll see. Thank you very much for the support. Thank you so much."

The men's doubles match proved to be historic. Nielsen is the first Danish man to make the Wimbledon finals since 1955, when his grandfather played in the singles final. Marray was the first British man to play in the men's doubles final since 1960.

"We can't believe it. It's tough to sink in. I don't know what to say," Marray said afterwards.

On Sunday, Andy Murray will go head to head with Roger Federer in the men's singles final.

The last time a Briton reached the Wimbledon men's singles final, the photos taken of the event were in black and white.

On Friday, Andy Murray became the first one in 74 years. Now, he’s up against six-time champion Roger Federer for the final on Sunday. No matter who wins, history will be made. If Murray wins, during this year of Queen Elizabeth II's Diamond Jubilee, you can bet the pubs will be full on Sunday night. If Federer wins, he will join American Pete Sampras and Briton William Renshaw atop the list of all-time men's singles champions.

The Wimbledon finals bring all of the drama to resounding conclusion, in crushing defeat or resounding victory, for two women and two men.

Perhaps you dine on strawberries and cream every summer in your best white outfit in honor of the international event. Or you’re just tuning in to see if Murray makes it in one of those gripping human-interest sports stories viewers like to seize on.

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