February 22nd, 2013
07:56 PM ET

Microsoft: Computers hacked as at Apple and Facebook

Microsoft was hacked much like Facebook and Apple, the technology company announced today on its security blog.

Microsoft said that its investigators "found a small number of computers, including some in our Mac business unit ... were infected by malicious software using techniques similar to those documented by other organizations."

Apple said Tuesday that some of its employees' computers were compromised, and Facebook revealed a similar breach weeks earlier.

Read more about Apple, Facebook hacks

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Filed under: Apple • Facebook • Microsoft • Security breaches
Facebook says it was hacked
February 15th, 2013
06:24 PM ET

Facebook says it was hacked

The largest social network in the world is the latest high-profile site to say it's been hacked this year but it says no ndta about its more than a billion users was compromised.

Facebook described the "sophisticated attack" in a blog post on Friday, saying it took place in January when a small number of employees visited a compromised website that installed malware on their machines.

Twitter announced a similar intrusion earlier this month, and major news organizations including The New York Times, Wall Street Journal and Washington Post have also admitted to being hacked.

FULL STORY
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Filed under: Facebook • Technology
February 4th, 2013
04:50 AM ET

#BlackoutBowl generates social media moment for jokesters, advertisers

Call it the Super Bowl MVP - the most valuable power outage.

For 35 bewildering minutes Sunday night, the Super Bowl showdown between the Baltimore Ravens and the San Francisco 49ers ground to a halt when half of the lights in the New Orleans Superdome went out.

Players stretched on the field. The more than 71,000 fans in attendance did the wave.

And with no immediate explanation for the outage, social media lit up.

FULL STORY
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Filed under: California • Facebook • Maryland • New Orleans • Technology • Twitter • U.S.
'Gay' dog gets euthanasia reprieve
The Facebook page of TN Euthanasia said this dog was given up because its owner considered it gay.
January 31st, 2013
10:48 PM ET

'Gay' dog gets euthanasia reprieve

A dog whose rejection by his owner caused an Internet uproar has been adopted into a new, and presumably more tolerant, home.

The male pit bull mix, whose name no one seems to know, was left at the Madison County, Tennessee, Rabies Control animal shelter, CNN affiliate WBBJ reported.

According to the irreverent website Gawker, Facebook users had a hissy fit Wednesday when they found out the dog's owner got rid of the animal after he (the dog, not the owner) humped another male dog.

"His owner threw him away (because) he refuses to have a 'gay' dog!" a Facebook user named TN Euthanasia wrote.

The post went semi-viral, with 861 likes, 1,869 comments and 5,048 shares. After Gawker told the rest of the digital world about it, noting that the dog was in imminent danger of being put down, the shelter was swamped with calls offering to adopt the uncloseted canine.

By Thursday morning, shelter workers confirmed to WBBJ that the amorous animal had been adopted by a person associated with a rescue/shelter group.

What would you name this dog if you adopted him? Share your ideas in the comments below.

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Filed under: Animals • Dogs • Facebook • Gay and lesbian • Tennessee • U.S.
November 29th, 2012
11:40 AM ET

New York cop's act of kindness goes viral

[Updated at 8:45 a.m. ET Friday] Here's how a simple act of kindness can become a worldwide inspiration and a public relations bonanza for the New York Police Department.

In a case of being in the right place at the right time, a tourist from Arizona, who happens to work in law enforcement herself, was visiting New York City earlier this month when she noticed a man without shoes asking for change near Times Square.

FULL POST

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Filed under: Facebook • New York • Social media • Times Square
Facebook earns $1.2 billion in third quarter
Mark Zuckerberg rings the Nasdaq opening bell on May 18, 2012.
October 23rd, 2012
04:38 PM ET

Facebook earns $1.2 billion in third quarter

There was a whole lot of talk about a Facebook face plant when the company's stock first went public.

And then there were massive concerns about how the company was raising money and moving into the future. We just got a little bit of information that may show whether critics were right or not. The company's third quarter sales were reported to be $1.2 billion, a number that is in line with analyst expectations, according to CNNMoney.com.

Their stock began rising, showing perhaps, that better things are on the horizon for the social media giant.

Facebook pulls location-tracking feature
The 'Find Friends Nearby' feature aimed to help Facebook users make new contacts.
June 26th, 2012
02:01 PM ET

Facebook pulls location-tracking feature

Following a period of freak-out on the Internet on Monday, Facebook appears to have pulled a controversial feature that let the social network's users get a digital list of other Facebookers nearby.

The "Find Friends Nearby" feature was not accessible in a CNN test on Tuesday morning, and other media outlets, including CNET, reported that Facebook had pulled the service.

In a statement e-mailed to CNN, a Facebook spokeswoman declined to elaborate.

"This wasn't a formal release - this was something that a few engineers were testing," the spokeswoman wrote. "With all tests, some get released as full products, others don't. Nothing more to say on this for now - we'll communicate to everyone when there is something to say."

FULL STORY
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Toast to fallen sailor goes viral
May 28th, 2012
11:08 PM ET

Toast to fallen sailor goes viral

A bar patron's toast to a fallen sailor has become a phenomenon on Facebook.

On March 28, Hannah Hobbs, a waitress at a Bennigan's restaurant near Borger in the Texas Panhandle, posted a photo of a glass of beer, with a handwritten note from the customer that read:

In memory of Lt. j.g. Francis Toner, USN.
Killed in action 27 March 2009,
Baikh Province, Afghanistan
"Non Sibi Sed Patriae"
NOT FORGOTTEN!

In her photo caption Hobbs explained:

"This guy came in today and asked if it was ok if he left this on the bar.. I cried :( I left it there until like 1130 tonight.... I didn't want to pour it out but I had to. So I'm posting this pic so it can stay forever!! So can I get some likes people??"

Yes, yes she could get some likes. As of 10 p.m. ET Monday, Memorial Day, 1,239,045 people had clicked the "Like" button, and the numbers were continuing to skyrocket as the image was shared more than 117,000 times. FULL POST

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Filed under: Afghanistan • Facebook • Military • U.S. Navy • War
Overheard on CNN.com: 'I saw this one coming a mile away,' reader says of Facebook
This thumb points upward at Facebook's headquarters in Menlo Park, California, but many readers see things differently.
May 23rd, 2012
07:11 PM ET

Overheard on CNN.com: 'I saw this one coming a mile away,' reader says of Facebook

Editor's note: This post is part of the Overheard on CNN.com series, a regular feature that examines interesting comments and thought-provoking conversations posted by the community.

We've seen a lot of talk about the Facebook IPO's less-than-stellar debut. Some are surprised; some aren't. We decided to look back at the comments from our readers and see how views have changed or indeed whether they have changed. Here's some comments from before and after the IPO; looks like many are saying "I told you so."

BEFORE

Back at the end of January, we were seeing a lot of cynicism about the IPO. Much of it was centered around the idea that going public might affect the course of a business' mission. We also heard from a lot of readers who said they didn't like Facebook in general. To be fair, there were also plenty of folks who said they thought it was a good move for CEO Mark Zuckerberg and Co.

Facebook IPO's meaning: Zuckerberg faces reality

People at that time were talking about increased focus on profit after an IPO.

BossMoney: "Facebook is now 100% profit-driven ... expect it to turn into an advertising billboard and your personal info to be sold to commercialists as shareholders demand mega-profits from this ... Facebook and Zuckerberg are on the way out ..."

zeitsev: "This will be the end of Facebook. Just like all other companies that thought this was a good idea, a business-minded (not consumer-minded) Board of Directors will oust the CEO, and install another businessman who will ruin everything that Zuckerberg built. Like him or not, Zuckerberg has largely been consumer-oriented and won't allow ads to impede usability. That won't be the case when an MBA gets a hold of it."

Fr33Th1nk3r: "I miss the old, non-corporate capitalism. Where small business thrived, and big business didn't sell your privacy to the highest bidder."

Others were feeling cynical about Zuckerberg.

URKiddinMe: "Now he's going to have to answer to shareholders. I hope they beat him down to a pulp. Can't stand the guy or FB."

whatfor2name: "You cannot compare Zuckerberg to Gates and Jobs. The first one is manipulative and sick, the other two are creative and mature."

BanHammer: "Jealous much?"

This reader was more optimistic. FULL POST

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Filed under: Business • Facebook • Finance • Overheard on CNN.com • Social media • Technology
Oh, Zuck: Facebook's bumpy start just got a little worse
May 23rd, 2012
11:55 AM ET

Oh, Zuck: Facebook's bumpy start just got a little worse

To say its been a rough ride for Facebook's IPO would be an understatement.

And as the social media giant edges toward the close of its first week of trading, questions are swirling about the company's valuation, its profitability and now allegations that full details of the stock's likely value were shared with only a select group of people.

Did some people get a heads-up Facebook's IPO wasn't what it seemed?

Regulators are now looking into the possibility that Facebook's Wall Street investment banks may have tipped off some clients that Facebook wasn't necessarily a great buy or worth the hype it was receiving, according to reports Wednesday from Reuters and several other news organizations.

“Facebook changed the numbers – they didn’t forecast their business right and they changed their numbers and told analysts,” a person at one of Facebook’s banks told Reuters.

Overheard on CNN.com 'I saw this one coming from a mile away'

The big question is: Did certain privileged customers receive information about the Facebook offering that you as an individual investor might not have?

Rick Ketchum, head of the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, an independent regulatory body, acknowledged in an article from Reuters that a Morgan Stanley analyst reduced his revenue projections for Facebook shortly before the offering and shared the information with institutional investors.

And now Facebook shareholders have filed a lawsuit against the social network, CEO Mark Zuckerberg and a number of banks, alleging that crucial information was concealed ahead of Facebook's IPO. The lawsuit, filed in the U.S. District Court in Manhattan on Wednesday morning, charges the defendants with failing to disclose in the critical days leading up to Friday's initial public offering "a severe and pronounced reduction."

Facebook  defended themselves on Wednesday saying they "believe the lawsuit is without merit and will defend ourselves vigorously."

The report, and now the lawsuit, raises questions about whether Morgan Stanley, one of the underwriter companies that handled Facebook's IPO, or other banks knowingly offered certain investors privileged information that should have been made public. Other underwriters targeted by the lawsuit include Barclays Capital, Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan Chase and Merrill Lynch, a unit of Bank of America.

It is possible that Morgan Stanley may have signed off on a price that was too high or agreed to sell too many shares in the deal, CNNMoney.com reports. Then, Morgan Stanley analysts are alleged to have told certain people they had a negative assessment of the social network's offering.

"If true, the allegations are a matter of regulatory concern to FINRA and the [Securities and Exchange Commission]," Ketchum said in a statement via a spokeswoman.

The New York Times reported Morgan Stanley did more than just quietly share a negative outlook; they actually "held conference calls to update their banks' analysts on business."

"Analysts at Morgan Stanley and other firms soon started advising clients to dial back their expectations," the article says. "One prospective buyer was told that second-quarter revenue could be 5 percent lower than the bank’s earlier estimates."

Sallie Krawcheck, Bank of America's former head of wealth management, took to Twitter to share her outrage about the allegations.

A glitch leaves investors not knowing if they have Facebook stock

Facebook's debut on the market was hindered by early confusion when trading was delayed by two hours after what Nasdaq called a "technical error."

"People didn't know where their orders stood, and it became a big guessing game," one trader, who had put in an order to buy Facebook shares ahead of the opening bell, told CNNMoney.com. "Nasdaq couldn't handle it - they blew it."

FULL POST

May 18th, 2012
08:34 PM ET

Overheard on CNN.com: Friday funnies

Editor's note: This post is part of the Overheard on CNN.com series, a regular feature that examines interesting comments and thought-provoking conversations posted by the community.

It's Friday. Let's end the week by taking a look at some funny comments about stories in the news. First, we venture backwards in time to your teenage years.

New French PM's name causes Arab giggles

Prime Minister Jean-Marc Ayrault's name sounds like Arabic slang for male genitalia. Some thought this story might inspire kids to learn foreign languages.

Uncle_Dutch: "Some people never get out of junior high. On a positive note, it might be just the spark to get the Beavis & Butthead types of this country to finally learn a foreign language."

readerz: "Vastly educational. We just learned two new words in Arabic, in the long-standing tradition of every foreign-language student who looks up all of 'those' words first. I hope that Mr. Ayrault and (Pakistani diplomat Akbar Zeb) continue to educate. At least the article did not use Victorian English, where there is another word used in place of the word 'said.' Reminds me of something produced by Congress, but maybe the language would need to be aborted."

Politicians with dirty-sounding names are nothing new, readers say.

Niki Bush: "If we can get over the fact that two of our presidents were Bush, then we can get over the fact that the French (prime minister) president's name means penis in the Arabic world. I had an uncle named Richard Head, and when you go through your entire life with the last name that is an euphemism for the downtown area, every other wacky name just isn't really all that funny."

Some people are all too familiar with this issue.
FULL POST

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Filed under: Facebook • Overheard on CNN.com • Politics
Facebook: Use it. 'Like' it. But, buy it?
May 17th, 2012
03:15 PM ET

Facebook: Use it. 'Like' it. But, buy it?

It started as the little engine that maybe, possibly could. Facebook swirled around college campuses and became a way to find out a little bit more about your classmates. But when the site went mainstream, it spread like a digital wildfire and in eight years it has gone from the little engine that could into the juggernaut tank in the social media world.

Now, the company's long road to an initial public offering is officially coming to an end. And today it will fill in one last piece of the puzzle: It's final IPO price.

Timeline: Mark Zuckerberg's rise from child prodigy to Facebook billionaire

It's not just the talk of the town or Silicon Valley, but about to be the talk of .... well, everyone. Want perspective? Facebook could raise as much as $16 billion in its IPO. That would make it the largest tech IPO in history - and the third largest U.S. IPO ever, trailing only the $19.7 billion raised by Visa  in March 2008 and the $18.1 billion raised by automaker General Motors in November 2010, according to rankings by Thomson Reuters.

Why Facebook won't start trading at the opening bell 

So as the big day approaches we wanted to give you a little insight into the company and the ins and outs of going public.

A look at the hottest ticket in town

Some days you love Facebook. Some days you want to delete your profile, run away and never, ever return. Since Facebook's big foray into mass-market appeal, you'll always hear arguments for both.

It's been lauded for helping connect generations. It's also been called things that make you think it's the devils spawn.

FULL POST

May 17th, 2012
03:05 PM ET

Timeline: Mark Zuckerberg's rise from child prodigy to Facebook billionaire

You know him as the man behind the mega social media site Facebook. But do you know about how he got there?

As his company prepares to go public, we wanted to take a look back on his life and how he ended up as one of the most prominent tech company founders.

CNNMoney is trying to buy Facebook IPO shares 

Personal details:

* Birth place: Dobbs Ferry, New York

* Birth name: Mark Elliot Zuckerberg

* Parents: Edward, a dentist, and Karen, a psychiatrist, Zuckerberg

* Education: Phillips Exeter Academy, 2002

Harvard University, 2002 – 2004, dropped out

Facebook: Use it. 'Like' it. But, buy it?

Other Facts:

* Is red-green colorblind.

* Took a graduate computer course at Mercy College when he was eleven.

* Became captain of the fencing team at Phillips Exeter Academy.

* Considered a prodigy by his early computer tutor David Newman.

* Co-created a software program named Synapse, which learned a listener's music habits.

* Met long-term girlfriend Priscilla Chan during his sophomore year at Harvard University.

Timeline:

* 1996 – Creates an instant messaging service for his dad's dentist office called ZuckNet.

* 2003 – Creates facemash.com at Harvard, a website rating system to rank the physical attractiveness of those whose pictures he had downloaded from the school directory – without permission. The site garners lots of attention, both positive and negative, from the student body, and negative attention from the school administration. Zuckerberg is forced to take the site down.

FULL POST

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Filed under: Facebook • Technology
May 14th, 2012
08:02 PM ET

Overheard on CNN.com: Wild times on Wall Street, busy day for business news

Editor's note: This post is part of the Overheard on CNN.com series, a regular feature that examines interesting comments and thought-provoking conversations posted by the community.

Things have been eventful in the business world. Readers are certainly talking about these recent developments.

JPMorgan investment chief out

Ina Drew, JPMorgan Chase's chief investment officer, has left the bank after revelations of a $2 billion loss sustained over the past six weeks. Readers talked about the fact that she is retiring.

Cliff Eden Gardner: "Wow, wish I could still be set for life after costing my company billions."

dcjohnny: "Go to school, then work 80 hours a week, then go back to school, then work even harder. Ascend to the respect level she commanded via an extraordinary career, and then – if you find yourself at the tail end of a bad decision gone haywire – you will most likely be able to retire with more money than any of your friends. You know how not to reach that potential? Complain about others and elect people who will throw you the occasional scraps from their table every election cycle."

Melissa Walker: "Someone costs your company $2 BILLION and you're allowed to retire? With a golden parachute and pension and everything? Sheesh, even after the financial collapse, it's clear the Fat Cats don't get it - FIRE THE WITCH-RHYMES-WITH and let her enjoy the wide world of unemployment and looking for a job at her age with her 30 years of experience."

mwilder: "Until we have regulations in place this will continue to happen. Plain and simple."

Similar conversation, with a dash of wisecracks, followed this story. FULL POST

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Filed under: Business • Economy • Facebook • Finance • Overheard on CNN.com
April 10th, 2012
07:51 PM ET

Overheard on CNN.com: Facebook's $1 billion Instagram buy shocks readers, users

Editor's note: This post is part of the Overheard on CNN.com series, a regular feature that examines interesting comments and thought-provoking conversations posted by the community.

CNN.com readers and iReporters alike are pondering the effects of a blockbuster purchase of Instagram by social network giant Facebook. Users and tech lovers are abuzz about what the buy will mean.

Facebook acquires Instagram for $1 billion

CNNMoney readers disagreed about whether this was a good move.

jones19876: "I don't see the point, and certainly not the value in this; Instagram may bring 30m users along, but Facebook already has them in their grasp, it's like buying an extra copy of a DVD you already own."

Jason Crow: "Sometimes the investment is in keeping users. Instagram was quickly becoming a leader in an area that Facebook currently dominates, which is the sharing of photos. I think Facebook is being proactive here."

This reader said the development was inevitable. FULL POST

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Filed under: Facebook • Overheard on CNN.com • Technology
Overheard on CNN.com: What's the password?
Reports about employers asking job applicants for their Facebook passwords provoked strong reaction.
March 23rd, 2012
12:07 PM ET

Overheard on CNN.com: What's the password?

Editor's note: This post is part of the Overheard on CNN.com series, a regular feature that examines interesting comments and thought-provoking conversations posted by the community.

Would you give up your Facebook password to get a job? Reacting to reports that some employers were requiring job applicants to do so, a lot of CNN.com commenters said no or more accurately, @%&#@ no!

The American Civil Liberties Union is fighting to block employers from requiring users to share their social-networking passwords, arguing that it is an invasion of privacy.

ACLU: Facebook password isn't your boss' business

Facebook also weighed in about the controversial practice, telling employers not to ask for the passwords unless they possibly want to get sued.

Facebook speaks out against employers asking for passwords

Commenter IamBobBobIam says the first thing he does when considering job candidates is check out their Facebook page.

"If they have anything on there bashing a previous employer or anything of the sort, their resume immediately goes into the recycle bin."

(But asking for a password crosses the line, he says.) "In my mind it is the same as asking for their personal e-mail password."

Jason Fournier agreed that it was invasive and said job hunters should sue.

"Demanding an applicant's Facebook password is equivalent to demanding a copy of the key to their house. Civil lawsuits against such prospective employers should easily succeed, and once the first multimillion dollar penalty against an employer idiotic enough to insist the applicant provide their password is won, this whole story will happily go away.

Several commenters evoked the ghost of Johnny Paycheck, who famously sang "Take This Job and Shove It".

Dan Overholtz: If a boss ever asked me to do that, I'd tell 'em where to shove it. I need a job badly but not that bad!

Some commenters sided with companies and understood why these firms would want to know what prospective employees were doing online.

Cat Nippy: In certain jobs, such as those requiring a security clearance, it might be a valid requirement. Some jobs also have a character clause in the employment contract, and the employer might like to know in advance of hiring and training you if you have nasty things posted on your (Facebook) page.

Qroozer: I think it's fair for companies to do this. They should be able to find out everything they can about who they are hiring.

FULL POST


Filed under: Facebook • Jobs • Overheard on CNN.com • Technology
Overheard on CNN.com: Dear government, my omelet was delicious this morning
A surveillance program monitors "bad" words on Facebook and other social-media sites, a privacy group's lawsuit reveals.
March 9th, 2012
03:36 PM ET

Overheard on CNN.com: Dear government, my omelet was delicious this morning

Editor's note: This post is part of the Overheard on CNN.com series, a regular feature that examines interesting comments and thought-provoking conversations posted by the community.

"Drone came by yesterday. I was sitting on the can. Asked what I was doing...snapped a few pics. I flushed. 'Why do you want to know?' 'Just doing my job, sir ... just wondering what you were doing.' 'Look suspicious?' 'Not sure ... you were sitting, not standing, right?' 'Right,' I said. 'I'll put that in my report ... why did you flush so fast?' 'I was done.' 'You know that can't be verified, sir.' 'Sorry,' I said. 'We'll be watching,' it said. Then it left. Yes, without another word, it flew away and disappeared into the blue, afternoon sky like the brilliant cyber creature that it surly was."
–Floyd Mills

Comedian Dean Obeidallah wrote a column expounding on the government's Twitter searches. Readers responded with comedic takes of their own.

The government is reading your tweets

Some suggested we ought to watch the government.

rlowens1: "Perhaps, we can clean up Washington, if we insist that all candidates for public office, should they be elected, consent to have ALL of their communications monitored for the duration they are in office? Sure, it infringes on their civil rights. But, isn't that ok, as long as it furthers the public interests and improves security for us all? That is the argument they're using on us."

Others wanted to sabotage the effort.

FoxTS: "So in short, everyone should make sure to use 5-7 of these words in at least two posts every day. Thus making this data mining project all but useless."

ENDFEDNOW: "Smallpox, virus, nerve gas, anthrax, dirty bomb, radioactive, nuclear facility, and hummus ought to do the trick... ;-)"

rlowens1: "No, that would just make it more expensive."

Imagine your breakfast on a billboard.
FULL POST

February 1st, 2012
05:12 PM ET

Facebook files for $5 billion IPO

At long last, the Holy Grail of Internet IPOs is here. Facebook filed Wednesday to raise $5 billion in an initial public offering.

It's not yet known on which stock exchange Facebook will trade, or what its ticker symbol will be.

In 2011, Facebook earned $1 billion on sales of $3.7 billion. As of December 31, Facebook had 845 million daily active users.

The vast majority of Facebook's revenue comes from advertising: a combination of search and display ads.

Facebook's other revenue stream is its payment system for purchases within apps and games: Facebook Credits. Facebook keeps 30% of the revenue from those payments, and passes the remaining 70% on to the app developer.

FULL STORY
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Filed under: Business • Facebook • Finance • Technology
December 21st, 2011
02:46 PM ET

Dad charged after allegedly showing toddler bound with tape on Facebook

A 21-year-old man in Chicago is charged with battery after allegedly binding his toddler's wrists, ankles and mouth with tape and posting a photo online.

Above the photo of the girl, which Andre Curry allegedly put on his Facebook page, were the words, "This is wut happens wen my baby hits me back. ;)," according to Chicago media reports.

The Facebook page appears to have been taken down. But the image was picked up by other websites.

A public defender for Curry did not immediately return a call from CNN on Wednesday.

Curry is charged with aggravated domestic battery, Chicago police said. He appeared in court Wednesday, where bond was set at $100,000, CNN affiliate WGN reported.

The photo at issue shows a young girl with what appears to be painter's tape over her mouth and binding her wrists and ankles.

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Filed under: Crime • Facebook
Overheard on CNN.com: Dodging explicit content in your Facebook feed
Facebook has been hit by a widespread attack spamming porn and violent images, security experts say.
November 15th, 2011
05:32 PM ET

Overheard on CNN.com: Dodging explicit content in your Facebook feed

"They're sure it's a spam attack? And not just users uploading their Halloween photos?"
– snarkattack

You might start longing for the days of excessively personal status updates and Farmville activity clogging up Facebook news feeds. Recent reports of porn, violent images and other graphic content on the social networking site (including by some of our own CNN.com staffers) have gotten readers talking.

Facebook: Hack identified, most porn removed

"This happened to me 3 weeks ago," wrote user mongoo. "Real embarrassing. I deleted my Facebook account and haven't looked back since. I actually feel free again."

Readers described the images they encountered. "I saw the dead dog, very sad and disgusting," noted lamp29.

FULL POST

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