Boston bombing suspect could be informed of charges today
Dzokhar Tsarnaev could be informed of charges as early as Sunday, a Department of Justice official tells CNN.
April 21st, 2013
10:57 AM ET

Boston bombing suspect could be informed of charges today

Federal officials hope to inform Dzhokhar Tsarnaev of charges as early as today, a Department of Justice official tells CNN's Pamela Brown.

The 19-year-old suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing remains in serious but stable condition in a Boston hospital, where he's under heavy guard.

While a presentment of charges could take place Sunday, an official arraignment would take place later. Normally, a person who faces federal charges must be arraigned within 48 hours.

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Boston bombing suspect unable to talk
April 21st, 2013
04:11 AM ET

Boston bombing suspect unable to talk

Perhaps the only man in the world who can explain why the Boston Marathon bombings took place is sedated with a tube down his throat, unable to speak.

Suspect Dzhokar Tsarnaev was in serious but stable condition at a Boston hospital and cannot talk, Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick told reporters.

"I, and I think all of the law enforcement professionals, are hoping for a host of reasons that the suspect survives, because we have a million questions, and those questions need to be answered," the governor said Saturday.

As Tsarnaev remains under heavy guard at the hospital, a flurry of new details have emerged in the case.

FULL STORY
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April 20th, 2013
10:12 PM ET

Boston manhunt: The day after

[Update 10:12 p.m.] Dzhokar Tsarnaev is currently intubated and sedated, a source who receives regular intelligence briefings on the Boston bombings said Saturday, according to CNN's Deborah Feyerick.

Earlier, a federal official, speaking on condition of anonymity, told CNN on Saturday that Tsarnaev has injuries to his throat and may not be able to talk.

Tsarnaev is being treated for wounds at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Authorities have not publicly detailed the injuries sustained by the teen, whom authorities captured on Friday night in Watertown, Massachusetts.

Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick told reporters on Saturday that Tsarnaev was in "serious but stable condition" and "not yet able to communicate yet."

[Update 9:22 p.m.] Two key Republicans on the House Homeland Security Committee Rep. Mike McCaul of Texas, the panel's chairman; and Rep. Peter King of New York will press the Obama administration for details about the FBI's questioning of Tamerlan Tsarnaev in 2011, according to a GOP congressional source.

FBI agents interviewed Tamerlan two years ago and also looked at his travel history, checked databases for derogatory information and searched for Web postings. The agency found no connection with terror groups, an FBI official told CNN.

Tamerlan Tsarnaev, who was not a U.S. citizen, traveled to Sheremetyevo, Russia, in January 2012, according to travel records provided by a U.S. official. He returned six months later.

[Update 9:03 p.m.] After the charges are filed, the Federal Public Defender Office in Boston will be appointed to represent Dzhokar Tsarnaev, according to Miriam Conrad, the federal public defender for the Massachusetts district. Conrad stressed that the office has not yet been appointed to defend him.

[Update 7:32 p.m.] Dzhokar Tsarnaev has injuries to his throat and may not be able to talk, a federal official, speaking on condition of anonymity, told CNN on Saturday.

[Update 6:17 p.m.] Sen. Carl Levin, D-Mich., chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, rejected calls for Dzhokar Tsarnaev to be held as an enemy combatant under the law of war. "I am not aware of any evidence so far that the Boston suspect is part of any organized group, let alone al Qaeda, the Taliban, or one of their affiliates - the only organizations whose members are subject to detention under the Authorization for Use of Military Force, as it has been consistently interpreted by all three branches of our government.

"In the absence of such evidence I know of no legal basis for his detention as an enemy combatant. To hold the suspect as an enemy combatant under these circumstances would be contrary to our laws and may even jeopardize our efforts to prosecute him for his crimes."

[Update 5:21 p.m.] A senior U.S. official tells CNN it was Russia in 2011 that asked the FBI to look at Tamerlan Tsarnaev’s activities.

[Update 2:24 p.m.] Watertown Police Chief Edward Devaeu provided the most detailed version yet of the violent events that unfolded Thursday night and the subsequent manhunt for  Dzhokar Tsarnaev in an interview with CNN's Wolf Blitzer. You can read the full story here. Some of new details:

– Once police located Tsarnaev Friday evening, they used flash bang grenades before beginning to negotiate with him.

–An FBI negotiator on the second floor of the house spoke with the suspect while a helicopter above with a heat sensor recorded his movements even though he was underneath a tarp. After about 30 minutes, police got him to lift up his shirt and show his chest to prove he didn't have explosives on his body. Only then did they feel comfortable sending people in.

– Handguns, a rifle, and at least six bombs - three which had exploded - were found at the scene of Thursday night's violence in Watertown.

–During a shootout with police on Thursday night, the older brother, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, exited the vehicle he was in and started walking down the street, shooting at officers. He ran out of ammunition when he was only five or ten feet away from police. One officer then tackles him, and he and two or three others try to handcuff him.

–As they try to handcuff the older brother, the younger brother comes barreling at them in the vehicle. The officers dive out of the way, and Dzhokar runs over his brother, dragging him for a short distance. Police think this is what killed him.

[Update 1:19 p.m.] The Boston Red Sox are moments away from playing their first game in the city since Monday's bombings. The team will wear special jerseys with the word "Boston" across the front, instead or "Red Sox." The jerseys will be signed and auctioned off with proceeds going to The One Fund Boston. The team shared this picture on its Instagram page:

bostonredsox

[Update 1:05 p.m.] President Obama will continue to receive updates on the investigation from his team throughout the day, a White House official told CNN.

[Update 12:59 p.m. ET] The campus of the University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth will remain closed Saturday, a school spokesman said, so law enforcement can complete its investigation stemming from the Boston Marathon terror attack. The university, where Dzhokar Tsarnaev was a student, is preparing to reopen Sunday, spokesman John Hoey said.

[Update 11:34 a.m. ET] Early indications are that Dzhokar Tsarnaev and Tamerlan Tsarnaev acted alone, Chief Edward Deveau of the Watertown Police Department told CNN's Wolf Blitzer.

[Update 11:33 a.m. ET] Dzhokar Tsarnaev was on the campus of University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth every day after the attack until until late Thursday, a university official told CNN. Tsarnaev attended classes as well as parties in the dorms during that period.

[Update 11:18 a.m. ET] Fifty-seven people remain hospitalized Saturday as a result of the Boston Marathon terror attack, including three in critical condition, according to the latest CNN count.

[Update 11:15 a.m. ET] Ruslan Tsarni tells CNN more about the changing religious outlook of Tamerlan Tsarnaev. Tsarni noticed changes as far back as 2009. The uncle recalls a phone conversation in which Tsarnaev called him an "infidel." The young man also told his uncle he was not concerned about work or studies because God had a plan for him. The possible radicalization of Tsarnaev began around that time under the influence of an Armenian man who was a recent convert to Islam, Ruslan Tsarni said he learned from a family acquaintance. Tsarni said his radicalization happened "right there, in the streets of Cambridge."

[Update 10:07 a.m. ET] Federal terrorism charges against Boston Marathon bombings suspect Dzhokar Tsarnaev could be filed soon, even as he remains hospitalized, a Justice Department official told CNN. The 19-year-old could also face murder charges at the state level, the source said. There is no death penalty in Massachusetts, but Tsarnaev could face that punishment at the federal level.

[Update 9:37 a.m. ET] Anzor Tsarnaev, father of the bombing suspects, reiterated that he believes his sons are not responsible for the attack. He told CNN's Nick Paton Walsh in Dagestan that his sons "never, ever" could have done something like this, and that he will travel soon to the United States.

[Update 7:34 a.m. ET] Russia wants to receive official information about the bombing suspects from the United States, a spokesman for Russian President Vladimir Putin said on state television. Russia expects there will contact between investigators of both countries.

[Update 7:16 a.m. ET] Investigators in Dagestan, where the Boston bombing suspects' parents live, will not engage with the family, unless an order comes from Moscow to do so, Russia state news reported today.

[Update 7:15 a.m. ET] The White House has published a photo of President Obama receiving the news of the capture of the suspect hiding in the boat.

[Update 6:28 a.m. ET] Want to help people injured in the Boston Marathon bombings Monday?  Go to CNN's Impact Your World to find out how.

[Update 6:21 a.m. ET]  Though the suspects are no longer on the loose, the work on this case is not over.  There will be questions, and so far only one person can answer most of them - the 19-year-old suspect  in serious condition in a Boston hospital.  Even the president has said he wants answers.  Read the full story by CNN's Lateef Mungin.

[Update 6:14 a.m. ET] Life on the ice skates a step back towards normal Saturday in Boston, when the Pittsburgh Penguins will face the Boston Bruins in an NHL game at noon.

[Update 6:10 a.m. ET] Security officers still stand guard Saturday morning at the hospital, where "suspect number 2" is being treated.

[Update 5:05 a.m. ET] After a five-day nightmare, Boston can finally rest. One suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings is in custody. The other, his older brother, is dead. And residents across Massachusetts are cheering the officers who ended a week of hell.  Read the story by CNN's Holly Yan.

[Update 3:48 a. m. ET] The government of Kazakhstan distanced itself from the Boston bombing suspects saying there is no evidence the brothers lived in the country before coming to the United States. The Kazakhs condemned the Boston attacks.  The statement.

[Update 3:35 a.m.] BloombergBusinessweek reports: Shutting down Boston for a day cost $333 million.

[Update 3:33 a.m.] A flapping tarp ended a manhunt for the younger bombing suspect.  When authorities lifted an order for residents to stay locked indoors, a man went for a stroll in his backyard and saw that something didn't look right about the tarp on his boat.  Here's how it gave the suspect away.

[Update 3:31 a.m.] A photo tweeted by CNN affiliate WMUR reporter Jean Mackin shows "suspect number 2" through the window of an ambulance, as he is taken away from the scene in Watertown. His face can be seen on the lower left of the window.

Sus2 in ambulance

[Update 2:55 a.m.]  The family of  the wife of one suspected bomber issued a typed statement that was published on a local news website in Rhode Island, The North Kingstown Patch.  It read: "Our daughter has lost her husband today, the father of her child. We cannot begin to comprehend how this horrible tragedy occurred. In the aftermath of the Patriot's Day horror, we know that we never really knew Tamerlane Tsarnaev. Our hearts are sickened by the knowledge of the horror he has inflicted. Please respect our family's privacy in this difficult time."
See type written note here.

[Update 1:41 a.m.] The San Francisco Giants honored Boston victims by posting the message "#TogetherWereBoston" on the Jumbotron at AT&T Park during the team's game against the San Diego Padres.

[Update 1:10 a.m.] A powerful picture sent in by the Kafranbel Coordination Committee in the town of Kafranbel in northwest Syria.

[Update 12:45 a.m.] Montana Fredrick filmed students at Northeastern University celebrating in Hemenway Street on Friday night while first responders passed through. "Every time a police car passed by, the cheering became louder and a sense of respect and admiration was felt through the crowd," Fredrick said. "Many students donned American themed apparel with ample American flags dangling from windows and draped across students backs."

[Update 12:36 a.m.] Bassel Nasri, a friend of Dzokhar Tsarnaev, said the suspect never gave him a sense of being anti-American. The last time the two met was on April 8, the Monday before the Boston Marathon, when Tsarnaev gave him a ride to a soccer game.  "He seemed very fine. It was just like regular conversation, talking about soccer," Nasri said.

[Update 12:16 a.m. ET] Tsarnaev is being evaluated and treated at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center where he remains in serious condition. There is a heavy police presence. The FBI is expected to offer an update on his condition sometime this morning.

[Updated at 12:12 a.m.] The family of 8-year-old Martin Richard, one of three killed in the Boston Marathon bombing, thanked law enforcement for the arrest but added: "None of this will bring our beloved Martin back, or reverse the injuries these men inflicted on our family and nearly two hundred others. We continue to pray for healing and for comfort on the long road that lies ahead for every victim and their loved ones."

[Posted at 12:02 a.m.] College students and Bostonians alike took to the Boston common to celebrate the arrest of the alleged Boston Marathon bombing suspect.

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Boston bombings: 'CAPTURED!!! The hunt is over,' police say
Massachusetts celebrates after police captured Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokar Tsarnaev.
April 19th, 2013
10:47 PM ET

Boston bombings: 'CAPTURED!!! The hunt is over,' police say

[Updated 10:47 p.m. ET] Boston Marathon bombings suspect Dzhokar Tsarnaev is at Boston's Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, hospital spokeswoman Kelly Lawman said.

Meanwhile, Senators John McCain and Lindsey Graham congratulated law enforcement on the arrest of the Boston Marathon bombing suspect and noted that the incident should be prosecuted as a terror case. The "perpetrators of these acts were not common criminals attempting to profit from a criminal enterprise, but terrorist trying to injure, maim, and kill innocent Americans," the senators said.

"Under the Law of War we can hold this suspect as a potential enemy combatant not entitled to Miranda warnings or the appointment of counsel."

[Updated 10:11 p.m. ET] "We've closed an important chapter in this tragedy," President Barack Obama said at the conclusion of the Boston Marathon bombing manhunt on Friday night.

[Updated 9:49 p.m. ET] Suspect Dzhokar Tsarnaev is in serious condition in the hospital, Boston police Commissioner Ed Davis said.

But how did law enforcement find suspect Tsarnaev? A Watertown resident saw blood on a boat in his neighbor's backyard, Davis said.

"He opened the tarp and saw a man covered in blood," he said. The man retreated and alerted law enforcement.

Despite being bloody, the suspect exchanged gunfire with authorities from his hiding place, Davis said. Tsarnaev did not have explosives on him at the time of capture, according to Davis.

[Updated 9:41 p.m. ET] Massachusetts is celebrating the collaborative efforts of law enforcement, the public and the media in leading to the capture of the suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings.

"We're so grateful to bring justice and closure to this case," Massachusetts State Police spokesman Col. Timothy Alben said at a news conference in Watertown less than an hour after the capture of suspect Dzhokar Tsarnaev. "We're exhausted, folks, but we have a victory here tonight."

Gov. Patrick Deval praised local, state and federal agencies "who brought their A-game" along with members of the public "for their patience and participation in the case."

"Its a night where I think we're all going to rest easy," he said.

[Updated 9:20 p.m. ET] Now trending ahead of 9:30 press conference: #BostonStrong.

[Updated 8:59 p.m. ET] Law enforcement officials erupted in cheers in Watertown, Masssachusetts, on Friday night moments before Boston police tweeted that the remaining suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings was in custody.

[Updated 8:44 p.m. ET] Boston bombings suspect Dzhokar Tsarnaev is in custody, the Boston Police Department said in a tweet.

[Updated 8:44 p.m. ET] Law enforcement officials repeatedly appealed for surrender by a person believed to be Dzhokar Tsarnaev, the suspect in this week's Boston Marathon bombings, who was inside a boat in the backyard of a house in Watertown, Massachusetts, according to CNN staff at the scene. Among other things, they said, "We know you're in there" and "Come out with your hands up."

[Updated 8:39 p.m. ET] The FBI took two males and a female into custody for questioning Friday evening at New Bedford, Massachusetts, residence believe to have been connected to Boston Marathon bombings suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, New Bedford Police Lt. Robert Richard said.

[Updated 8:32 p.m. ET] FBI agents interviewed Tamerlan Tsarnaev - the 26-year-old Boston Marathon bombing suspect killed following a gunfight with authorities overnight - in 2011 at the request of foreign government, an FBI official said Friday. The other government - who the official would not name - suspected that Tsarnaev may have ties to extremist groups. The FBI investigated, including interviewing Tsarnaev, but the matter was closed after no derogatory information was found, according to the official.

[Updated 8:13 p.m. ET] A person believed to be Dzhokar Tsarnaev, the suspect in this week's Boston Marathon bombings, is cornered on a boat in a yard in Watertown, Massachusetts, law enforcement officials said.

[Updated 8:05 p.m. ET] Authorities believe the person they've engaged in Watertown, Massachusetts, is Dzhokar Tsarnaev, a suspect in this week's deadly Boston Marathon bombings, a law enforcement official told CNN. CNN crews reported hearing multiple explosions near the site where authorities have engaged the suspect.

[Updated 7:46 p.m. ET] As many as a dozen people were being moved away from the scene of intense police activity in Watertown, Massachusetts, including a young girl being carried in a police officer's arms, CNN's David Fitzpatrick reported.

[Updated 7:34 p.m. ET] Authorities have engaged the possible remaining suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings in Watertown, Massachusetts, a senior federal law enforcement official said.

[Updated 7:14 p.m. ET] The Boston Police Department tweeted that there are "police operations" on Franklin Street in Watertown, Massachusetts. CNN crew at the scene heard gunshots and saw several law enforcement vehicles race toward the scene.

[Updated 6:26 p.m. ET] A "stay indoors" order has been lifted in Boston while the manhunt continues for the remaining suspect in Monday's Boston Marathon bombings.

Authorities believe that 19-year-old Dzhokar Tsarnaev is likely still in Massachusetts, state police spokesman Col. Timothy Alben said Friday.

"He's a very violent and dangerous person," Alben said in a news conference Friday. "We do not have an apprehension of our suspect this afternoon, but we will have one."

Massachusetts state troopers will remain in Watertown, where the suspects engaged in an overnight gunfight with police, for at least three more days, Alben said.

Some 200 rounds" of gunfire were exchanged during the firefight, Gov. Deval Patrick added.

The area's public transit system, known as the T, has reopened Friday night after being shut down most of the day, Patrick said.

"We can return to living our lives."

[Updated 5:54 p.m. ET] Fifteen patients wounded in this week's marathon bombings remained hospitalized Friday at Boston Medical Center, the hospital said. One of those patients is in critical condition, 10 are in serious condition, and four are in fair condition. The Boston hospital - one of several in the area treating the wounded - received 23 patients tied to Monday's blasts overall.

Eleven patients wounded in this week's Boston Marathon bombings remain at Boston's Brigham and Women's Hospital - down from the more than 30 patients total the hospital has treated, and not including those treated at its affiliate Faulkner Hospital - the hospital said Friday. One of those patients is in critical condition. Several other Boston-area hospitals are still treating injured patients as well.

[Updated 5:12 p.m. ET] Anzor Tsarnaev - father of Boston bombings suspects Dzhokar Tsarnaev and Tamerlan Tsarnaev - who earlier told Russian national TV network Zvezda that he believed his sons were "framed" tells CNN from Dagestan that he was questioned Friday by Russian security services and then released.

[Updated 4:16 p.m. ET] Connecticut State Police have issued a new vehicle lookout alert in connection with the probe in neighboring Massachusetts: They say Boston-area authorities are looking for a 1995 gray Honda Odyssey with Massachusetts registration 93NN73. A suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing might be in that vehicle, police said.

Connecticut police have issued a few vehicle alerts today, saying they've been monitoring information coming from investigators across the state line.

[Updated 4:05 p.m. ET] Anzor Tsarnaev, father of the suspects, told Dagestani TV netowrk Zvezda that he believes "someone framed" his sons.

"Someone framed them," Anzor Tsarnaev said during the interview Friday in Russia's North Caucasus republic of Dagestan. "I don't know exactly who did it. But someone did. And being cowards, they shot the boy (Tamerlan) dead. There are cops like this."

Anzor Tsarnaev said that whoever was behind the Boston Marathon bombings "is a bastard."

He said he was trying to get in touch with his family members in Canada and the United States, but he can't get through by phone.

"Those are my kids, you understand? Maybe he will be shot dead, too," he told Zvezda. "They will say, well, he had weapons. Kids with weapons? ... They should arrest him maybe and bring him, but alive. Alive. And justice should decide who's right and who's guilty."

Noting that he had lived in the United States, Zvezda asked him whether he ever had problems with the U.S. justice system.

'No, never. But I just didn't face it ever. So can I know about the justice there? I didn't have any problems," he said.

[Updated 3:53 p.m. ET] Boston police say the second vehicle they were looking for today, a vehicle with Massachusetts plate 116 GC7, has been found.

[Updated 3:43 p.m. ET] "Investigators are recovering a significant amount of homemade explosives" from last night's Watertown scenes, and “there is no proof yet of accomplices," Massachusetts State Police Spokesman David Procopio said, according to CNN's Susan Candiotti.

Police had said that the suspects were throwing explosives at them during last night's pursuit in the Watertown area.

[Updated 3:27 p.m. ET] Amtrak service between Boston and New York has been suspended, police say:

Earlier Friday, Amtrak service between Boston and Providence, Rhode Island, was suspended. MBTA public transit service also is suspended in the Boston area.

[Updated 3:12 p.m. ET] A number of Friday evening events have been canceled or postponed in Boston because of the manhunt.

This includes tonight's Red Sox game at Fenway Park, scheduled for 7:10 p.m., and a Boston Bruins game.

[Updated 2:30 p.m. ET] Two students at the University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth, where Dzhokar Tsarnaev was registered, told CNN that they saw him on campus this week, after Monday's Boston Marathon bombing, CNN's Chris Lawrence reported.

Also Friday, a helicopter with a number of law enforcement personnel landed on campus, Lawrence reported.

The school ordered an evacuation of its campus on Friday. The school is located 65 miles south of Cambridge, just west of New Bedford.

[Updated 2:15 p.m. ET] Boston police confirm they're looking for a green '99 Honda sedan with Massachusetts registration 116 GC7.

[Updated 2:04 p.m. ET] Connecticut State Police have issued an alert for another vehicle, saying a wanted suspect in the Boston Marathon attack now could be in a 1999 green Honda Civic with Massachusetts license plate number 116 GC7. The CSP cited Boston authorities.

Connecticut police issued a similar alert earlier today for a different vehicle; that vehicle eventually was found unoccupied Friday in the Boston area, Boston police said.

[Updated 1:51 p.m. ET] More details on the Tsarnaev brothers:

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 19, the Boston Marathon attack suspect now at large, came to the United States on July 1, 2002, at age 8 on a tourist visa, a federal source said. While here, he sought asylum and became a citizen on September 11, 2012.

His older brother Tamerlan Tsarnaev, who was killed in a shootout with police overnight, came to the United States four years after his brother, on Sept. 6, 2006, at the age of 20, the source said. He came legally but was not naturalized. He was a green card holder and in the country lawfully.

See profile of the Tsarnaev brothers.

[Updated 1:23 p.m. ET] Dzhokar Tsarnaev became a U.S. citizen on September 11, 2012, a federal official said Friday. See profile of the Tsarnaev brothers.

[Updated 1:17 p.m. ET] Here's the latest chronology that CNN has on Thursday night's shooting and subsequent manhunt:

The violence began late Thursday with the robbery of a convenience store, according to Timothy Alben, superintendent of the Massachusetts state police. Soon after, in Cambridge, across the Charles River from Boston, Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer Sean Collier was fatally shot while he sat in his car, the Suffolk County District Attorney's Office said in a statement.

Police believe the Boston Marathon bombing suspects were responsible for the shooting.

The two suspects, according to authorities, then hijacked a vehicle at gunpoint in Cambridge, telling the driver that they are the marathon bombers, a law enforcement source told CNN's Joe Johns. At some point, apparently at a gas station, the source said, the driver escaped.

Police, who were tracking the vehicle using its built-in GPS system, picked up the chase in Watertown. The pursuit went into a residential neighborhood, with the suspects throwing explosives at the police. A firefight erupted and ultimately one suspect later identified as Tamerlan Tsarnaev got out of the car. Police shot him, and his brother ran over him as he drove away, according to the source.

Earlier, there had been reports that Dzhokar Tsarnaev escaped on foot instead of by vehicle.

A source briefed on the investigation said Tamerlan Tsarnaev was wearing explosives and an explosive trigger. He died later at Beth Israel Hospital.

Richard H. Donohue Jr., 33, a three-year veteran of the transit system police force, was shot and wounded in the incident and taken to a hospital, a transit police spokesman said Friday. The officer's condition was not immediately known.

[Updated 12:45 p.m. ET] Police are continuing to run down new leads and go door to door in Watertown in the Boston Marathon terror attack investigation, said Timothy Alben, superintendent of the Massachusetts state police. He told reporters that law enforcement will conduct a controlled blast later in Cambridge, an indication that police found suspected explosives.

[Updated 12:44 p.m. ET] Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick says his request for people in the Boston area to stay indoors remains in effect for now. "We know what an inconvenience it is, in Watertown and Cambridge in particular ... but it’s been enormously helpful … to law enforcement.”

[Updated 12:30 p.m. ET] The Kyrgyz government said Friday that the two Boston Marathon suspects moved from Kyrgyzstan 12 years ago to the Russian region of Dagestan, from where the Tsarnaev family emigrated to the United States.

"Given that the suspects left the Republic at the ages of 8 and 15, the State Committee for National Security of Kyrgyzstan considers it inappropriate to link them to Kyrgyzstan," it said.

Read this profile on the Tsarnaev brothers.

[Updated 12:25 p.m. ET] Dzhokar Tsarnaev, 19, was registered at the University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth, which ordered its campus evacuated on Friday. The school is located 65 miles south of Cambridge, just west of New Bedford.

"UMass Dartmouth has learned that a person being sought in connection with the Boston Marathon bombing has been identified as a student registered at UMass Dartmouth," the school said in a news release. "The campus is closed. Individuals on campus should shelter in place unless instructed otherwise."

[Updated 12:06 p.m. ET] Boston bombing suspect Dzhokar Tsarnaev has tweeted since the Boston Marathon bombings on what friends of his tell CNN is his Twitter account.

The tweets included one at 1:43 a.m. Wednesday that said, "I'm a stress free kind of guy."

On Monday at 8:04 p.m. hours after the bombings he tweeted a lyric from a song that rapper Jay-Z has sampled: "Ain't no love in the heart of the city, stay safe people."

On Tuesday shortly after midnight he tweeted, "There are people that know the truth but stay silent & there are people that speak the truth but we don't hear them cuz they're the minority."

[Updated 11:55 a.m. ET] The uncle of the Tsarnaev brothers told reporters outside his home in Montgomery County, Maryland, this morning that his family is "ashamed" to be related to the suspects.

Ruslan Tsarni said the 19-year-old suspect still on the run "has put a shame on our family, a shame on the entire ethnicity." Tsarni urged his nephew to turn himself in.

He said anyone capable of committing such a crime are "losers."

[Updated 11:20 a.m. ET] U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry praised law enforcement in their hunt for the Boston Marathon attack suspects.

"I think it is fair to say this entire week we have been in pretty direct confrontation with evil," he said. "In the past few days we have seen the best and we have seen the worst of human behavior and it is the best that all of us really want to focus on."

[Updated 10:55 a.m. ET] Taxi service in Boston has been restored, police said. The service had been suspended earlier today because of the manhunt in the Boston bombings case.

[Updated 10:52 a.m. ET] More details on the discovery of the vehicle that police had been looking for: Boston police say that it was found unoccupied:

[Updated 10:50 a.m. ET] Another flurry of police activity is happening in Watertown, the Massachusetts community where police say one suspect was killed and another was being sought.

Police are asking reporters to move back and stay down as a number of other officers are drawing guns in a certain area, CNN's Deborah Feyerick reports from Watertown.

[Updated 10:41 a.m. ET] Connecticut State Police say that a vehicle that might be connected to a suspect in the Boston Marathon attack has been recovered in the Boston area. The vehicle is a gray Honda CR-V with Massachusetts plate 316 ES9.

Connecticut police earlier had issued a lookout notice for the vehicle.

This is what Boston police had to say about the vehicle earlier, on Twitter: "Police seeking MA Plate: 316-ES9, ’99 Honda CRV, Color – Gray. Possible suspect car. Do not approach."

[Updated 10:29 a.m. ET] A high school friend of Dzhokar Tsarnaev, the suspect who Boston police say still is at large, is recalling what he remembers about him.

Eric Mercado told CNN that he went to Cambridge Rindge & Latin, a public high school, with Dzhokar Tsarnaev, 19. Both graduated, he said.

"We hung out; we partied; we were good high school friends," Machado told CNN. "We're all, like, in shock. We don't really understand. There were no telltale signs of any kind of malicious behavior from Dzhokar. It's all coming as a shock, really."

[Updated 10:24 a.m. ET] More background on the brothers that several sources tell CNN are the suspects involved in Thursday night's shootings and police chase and Monday's Boston Marathon bombings:

The Tsarnaev brothers were Kyrgyz passport holders, and used those passports when applying for green cards in the United States, an official in the central Asian republic of Kyrgyzstan said, according to CNN's Ivan Watson.

This doesn't mean they were born in Kyrgyzstan or that their family were Kyrgyz natives. Many Caucasus refugees received passports or refugee status in surrounding countries.

[Updated 10:14 a.m. ET] Some background on the brothers that several sources tell CNN are the suspects involved in Thursday night's shootings and police chase and Monday's Boston Marathon bombings:

Dzhokar Tsarnaev, 19, the Boston Marathon attack suspect now at large, came to the United States as a tourist in the early 2000s and asked for asylum while he was here, a federal source said. He was naturalized last year. Tamerlan, the 26-year-old brother who was killed overnight, came "a few years later" and was a green-card holder, not a naturalized citizen, the source said, according to CNN's Mike Ahlers.

[Updated 10:02 a.m. ET] We now have the name of he Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer who was killed Thursday night he was Sean Collier, 26, of Somerville, Massachusetts, according to the Middlesex district attorney’s office.

[Updated 9:48 a.m. ET] An aquatic director at Harvard University told CNN that he hired Dzhokar Tsarnaev as a lifeguard more than two years ago, but hasn't seen him for more than a year.

"He seemed like a very quiet, unassuming young man," the aquatic director, George McMasters, told CNN Friday morning. "He showed up on time, watched the water, rotated from position to position fine, got along well with students and swimmers there at the pool."

[Updated 9:34 a.m. ET] Boston police have released a new photo of Dzhokar Tsarnaev the suspect still being sought in the Watertown area.

[Updated 9:31 a.m. ET] The Boston bombings suspect who was killed in a confrontation with police overnight in the Boston area was wearing explosives and an explosive trigger when his body was recovered, a source briefed on the investigation says, according to CNN's Deborah Feyerick.

Several sources tell CNN that the dead suspect has been identified as Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, and the one still being sought in Watertown is Dzhokar Tsarnaev, 19.

Police have publicly said that the dead suspect is the man that the FBI previously identified as "Suspect No. 1" in the Boston Marathon bombings. They also have said publicly that the suspect that they chased and last saw in Watertown overnight is the man that the FBI said was "Suspect No. 2"; Boston police also have said that they're looking for Dzhokar Tsarnaev.

[Updated 9:16 a.m. ET] The brothers suspected in the Boston Marathon attack haven't been connected to the Russian region of Chechnya for many years, the Chechen president's office said, according to the Interfax news agency.

The Tsarnaev family years ago moved out of Chechnya to another Russian region, lived some time in Kazakhstan, and then went to the United States where the family members received a residence permit, the office said.

"Therefore, the individuals concerned did not live as adults in Chechnya," said Alvi Kamirov, press secretary for Chechnya's president.

[Updated 9:01 a.m. ET] Boston police have now named a suspect that authorities have been seeking this morning. "Suspect identified as 19 year-old Dzhokar Tsarnaev of Cambridge. Suspect considered armed & dangerous," Boston police said on Twitter.

Dzhokar Tsarnaev is a Boston Marathon bombings suspect that police are looking for in Watertown following a chase overnight and shootings overnight, several sources told CNN earlier Friday.

Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, was the suspect who was killed during a police confrontation overnight, those same sources told CNN.

Police have said that the man identified by the FBI as "Suspect No. 1" in the Boston Marathon bombings was killed in the police confrontation. The man identified by the FBI as "Suspect No. 2" is on the loose, last seen in Watertown, police said.

[Updated 8:52 a.m. ET] A recap of the developments that began Thursday night:

The violence began late Thursday with the robbery of a convenience store, not long after the FBI released images of two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings, Massachusetts State Police spokesman Col. Timothy Alben said.

Soon after, in Cambridge, across the Charles River from Boston, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer was fatally shot while he sat in his car, the Suffolk County District Attorney's Office said in statement. Police believe the bombing suspects were responsible for the shooting.

The same two suspects, according to authorities, then hijacked a car at gunpoint in Cambridge. They released the driver a half-hour later at a gas station. As police picked up the chase, the car's occupants threw explosives out the windows and shot at officers, according to the district attorney's office.

Officers fired back, wounding one of the men, possibly the person identified by the FBI as "Suspect No. 1." The man died at Beth Israel Hospital. He had bullet wounds and injuries from an explosion, according to officials. The second man apparently escaped.

Richard H. Donohue Jr., 33, a three-year veteran of the transit system police force, was shot and wounded in the incident and taken to a hospital, a transit police spokesman said Friday. The officer's condition was not immediately known.

[Correction at 1:36 p.m. ET] The 8:52 a.m. entry above initially said that the second man apparently escaped on foot. "On foot" has been removed, as that part no longer appears to be the case.

[Updated 8:44 a.m. ET] Police activity in Watertown where authorities believe they last saw "Suspect No. 2" during a chase overnight seems to be picking up, CNN's Deborah Feyerick reports from the community. A helicopter is hovering over a building, and reporters are being asked to move back from where they were.

[Updated 8:30 a.m. ET] The FAA has ordered a 3.5-nautical-mile temporary flight restriction over Boston "to provide a safe environment for law enforcement activities." The restriction is from surface to 3,000 feet, according to the FAA website.

[Updated 8:21 a.m. ET] “All taxi service in the city of Boston has been suspended pending further notice,” Boston Police said on its official Twitter account.

This meshes with authorities' request that all of Boston and many of its suburbs stay indoors with doors locked until further notice. All public transportation in Boston already has been suspended, schools are closed, and Amtrak service from Boston to Providence, Rhode Island, also has been suspended.

[Updated 8:16 a.m. ET] The Boston-area transit police officer who was shot and wounded overnight is Richard H. Donohue Jr., 33, a three-year veteran of the force, a transit police spokesman said Friday. Donohue was shot during the manhunt for the Boston Marathon bombing suspects.

[Updated 8:14 a.m. ET] Several sources tell CNN that the dead suspect has been identified as Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, and the one still being sought is Dzhokar Tsarnaev, age 19.

[Updated 8:10 a.m. ET] The suspects involved in the Boston bombings are brothers originally from the Russian Caucasus and had moved to Kazakhstan at a young age before coming to the United States several years ago, according to a source briefed on the investigation, CNN's Deborah Feyerick reported.

The older of the two brothers had the first name Tamerlan, had studied at Bunker Hill Community College, and wanted to become a engineer, the source said. He then took a year off to train as a boxer, according to the source.

The source said that a posting on a social media site in his name included the comments: "I don't have a single American friend. I don't understand them."

The source added that it should not be assumed that either brother was radicalized because of their Chechen origins.

[Updated 8:07 a.m. ET] "All of Boston" should shelter in place, Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick has just told reporters. The same applies to suburbs of Watertown, Newton, Belmont, Cambridge and Waltham, he said.

By shelter in place, Deval said he meant people should stay indoors, keep doors locked and not answer doors for anyone except for police.

Patrick also has confirmed to reporters that one Boston bombings suspect is dead and the other is on the loose.

He added:

An Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority officer was "seriously wounded" and is in surgery right now.
An MIT security officer was killed.

[Updated 7:59 a.m. ET] A recap of what authorities are telling Boston-area residents to do: Police ordered businesses in the suburb of Watertown and nearby communities to stay closed and told residents to stay inside and answer the door for no one but authorities.

The subway and Amtrak train systems have been shut down. Every Boston area school is closed.

"It's jarring," said CNN Belief blog writer Danielle Tumminio, who lives in Watertown.

[Updated 7:58 a.m. ET] The Boston bombings suspect who currently is on the run has been in the United States for "at least" a couple years, a federal law enforcement source tells CNN.

[Updated 7:40 a.m. ET] Boston police say on Twitter: "Door-to-door search 4 suspect in Watertown continues. Uniformed officers searching. Community consent critical."

[Updated 7:39 a.m. ET] The suspects in the Boston Marathon terror attack were brothers, a terrorism expert briefed on the investigation said, according to CNN's Deborah Feyerick.

[Updated 7:34 a.m. ET] One of two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombing the man police were looking for Friday morning has a name that is common among people from the North Caucasus, a source with knowledge of the investigation said Friday. That region includes the breakaway Russian republic of Chechnya.

Earlier Friday, The Associated Press reported that the two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings are brothers believed to be from an area near Chechnya.

[Updated 7:32 a.m. ET] Police in the Boston-area community of Cambridge say the public should "clear area of Norfolk Street in Cambridge." "Ongoing investigation. Potentially dangerous," Cambridge police said on Twitter.

[Updated 7:29 a.m. ET] Boston police have given a heads-up to the public: They'll be conducting a "controlled explosion" basically neutralizing a suspicious object near the area of Commonwealth Avenue and Charlesgate.

[Updated 7:28 a.m. ET] Recapping what a doctor at Boston's Beth Israel told reporters this morning about the death of the man police believe is "Suspect No. 1" in the Boston bombings: He had bullet wounds and injuries from an explosion, the doctor said.

The doctor said he didn't know the cause of death, and he didn't know what the explosion was. The suspect was pronounced dead after unsuccessful attempts to reanimate him, a hospital spokesman said.

Police said the man believed to be "Suspect No. 1" was wounded in Watertown near Boston following a pursuit. That pursuit came about after the fatal shooting of a Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer, authorities said.

[Updated 7:03 a.m. ET] The Associated Press has reported that the two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings are brothers believed to be from an area near Chechnya.

[Updated 6:48 a.m. ET] More transportation options in an out of Boston are being shut down as police look for "suspect No. 2" in the Boston Marathon bombings. Amtrak train service between Providence, Rhode Island, and Boston has been suspended, Amtrak said Friday.

This comes after Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority shut down Boston-area bus, subway, commuter rail, and ferry routes.

The FBI on Thursday released this image of what it called "suspect No. 2" in Monday's Boston Marathon bombings. Authorities said Friday that they're looking for him in the Boston suburb of Watertown.

[Updated 6:36 a.m. ET] A number of universities in the Boston area have been closed because of the manhunt for a suspect in the Boston Marathon terror attack, school officials said. They include Harvard University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston University, Emerson College, and Boston College.

[Updated 6:23 a.m. ET] A person who was shot and killed in the Boston Marathon terror attack manhunt is believed to have had explosives on his body, a law enforcement official with knowledge of the investigation said Friday.

[Updated 6:19 a.m. ET] Here's some more details about the public-transportation shutdown in Boston: All Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority service is suspended at the request of the police, Joe Pesaturo, the authority's public information officer, said Friday. This includes bus, subway, commuter rail, and ferry routes in the Boston area.

This comes as police say they're continuing to hunt down one of the suspects in Monday's Boston Marathon terror attack.

[Updated 5:59 a.m. ET] "Harvard University is closed due to public safety concerns. Please continue to watch this page for updates," the university announced on its website.

[Updated 5:55 a.m. ET]: President Obama was briefed overnight on the events happening in Watertown, CNN's Brianna Keilar reports.

[Updated 5:51 a.m. ET]: "Vehicle traffic in and out of Watertown suspended," say Boston Police on an official Twitter account.

[Updated 5:43 a.m. ET]: Mass transit in Boston has been suspended at the request of the police, says Joe Pesaturo, spokesman for the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority.

[Updated 5:37 a.m. ET]: Boston Police, via its official Twitter account, says businesses near 480 Arsenal Street in Watertown, Massachusetts, are closed until further notice. Employees are also instructed to stay home.

[Updated 5:20 a.m. ET]: MIT cancels Friday's classes, according to a letter from Israel Ruiz, the school's executive vice president and treasurer, and school Chancellor Eric Grimson.

"MIT suffered a tragedy last night: an MIT Police officer was shot and killed on our campus in the line of duty," says the letter, addressed to the MIT community. "While the circumstances around the officer's death remain the subject of an active investigation, what is certain is that the officer gave his life to defend the peace of our campus. His sacrifice will never be forgotten by the Institute. We are thinking now of his family, and our hearts are heavy. In consultation with faculty chair Sam Allen, we have decided to cancel classes today (Friday). All employees are encouraged to use their best judgment about whether they are prepared to come in to work today: any absence today will be considered excused."

[Updated 5:03 a.m. ET]: Police in Watertown sending robocalls to residents instructing them to stay indoors, reports CNN's Drew Griffin.

[Updated 4:45 a.m. ET]: One of the suspects believed to have planted bombs at the Boston Marathon is dead after a shootout with police, a police spokesman said.

The FBI on Thursday released this image of who it called "suspect No. 1" the Boston Marathon bombings. On Friday, police said he was killed in a Boston-area shootout with police.

[Updated 4:21 a.m. ET]: A suspect on the loose in Watertown, Massachusetts, matches the description of Suspect 2 a man pictured wearing a white cap - wanted in connection with the bombings at the Boston Marathon on Monday, police said early Friday.

[Updated 3:54 a.m. ET]: Massachusetts State Police, via Twitter: "Police will be going door by door, street by street, in and around Watertown. Police will be clearly identified. It is a fluid situation."

[Updated at 3:48 a.m. ET]: Massachusetts State Police, on its official Twitter feed, warns Watertown residents to stay in their homes and to not answer the door "unless it is an identified police officer." "If any concerns about someone at door, call 911 immediately. Repeat–Do not answer door, stay away from windows, keep doors locked," the state police says in another tweet.

[Updated 2:40 a.m. ET]: Massachusetts State Police spokesperson Dave Procopio said that they believe multiple possible explosive devices were used against police tonight during this incident at Watertown. It was unclear if the incident, which followed a police chase of a stolen vehicle, was related to the shooting on the MIT campus or any other incident in the Boston area.

[Updated 2:31 a.m. ET]: FBI spokesman Martin Feely tells CNN's Susan Candiotti: "We are engaged with our partners trying to determine if there is a connection." CNN's Drew Griffin, who is on the scene in Watertown, Massachusetts, said FBI agents are on the scene.

[Updated 2:21 a.m. ET]: MIT releases statement on shooting death of campus police officer: "MIT is heartbroken by the news that an MIT Police officer was shot and killed in the line of duty on Thursday night on campus, near Building 32 (the Stata Center). Our thoughts are now with the family." http://bit.ly/15lcg2r

[Updated 2:19 a.m. ET]: Boston Police Department's official Twitter feed says "there is an active incident ongoing in Watertown. Residents in that area are advised to remain in their homes. More details when available." FULL POST

April 19th, 2013
07:48 AM ET

Friday's live events

Watch CNN.com Live for continuing coverage of the investigation and fallout from Monday's fatal bombings at the Boston Marathon.

Today's programming highlights...

Continuing coverage - Texas fertilizer plant explosion

The Jodi Arias trial resumes on Tuesday, April 23

FULL POST

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Filed under: Boston • Crime • Massachusetts • On CNN.com today • Terrorism • Texas • U.S.
April 18th, 2013
07:43 AM ET

Thursday's live events

Watch CNN.com Live for continuing coverage of the investigation and fallout from Monday's fatal bombings at the Boston Marathon.

Today's programming highlights...

Continuing coverage - Texas fertilizer plant explosion

11:00 am ET - Boston interfaith service - President Obama joins officials, first responders and others for an interfaith service in honor of the victims of Monday's Boston Marathon bombings.

12:30 pm ET - Jodi Arias trial - Trial resumes in Phoenix in the case of Jodi Arias, who's accused of killing her ex-boyfriend in 2008.

CNN.com Live is your home for breaking news as it happens.

 

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Filed under: Boston • Massachusetts • On CNN.com today • Terrorism • Texas • U.S.
April 17th, 2013
07:43 AM ET

Wednesday's live events

Watch CNN.com Live for continuing coverage of the investigation and fallout from Monday's fatal bombings at the Boston Marathon.

Today's programming highlights...

8:30 am ET - Boston hospital briefing - Hear from officials at Boston Medical Center on the conditions of those injured in the marathon bombings.

9:30 am ET - John Kerry on Congressional host seat - The secretary of state will testify before the House Foreign Affairs Committee on securing U.S. interests abroad.  He may bring up North Korea and the Boston bombings.

FULL POST

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Filed under: Boston • Crime • Justice • Massachusetts • On CNN.com today • Politics • Terrorism • U.S.
April 16th, 2013
07:41 AM ET

Tuesday's live events

Watch CNN.com Live for continuing coverage of the investigation and fallout from Monday's fatal bombings at the Boston Marathon.

Today's programming highlights...

9:30 am ET - FBI briefing on Boston bombings - FBI officials are expected to discuss their investigation into Monday's fatal bombings at the Boston Marathon.

FULL POST

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Filed under: Boston • Crime • Massachusetts • On CNN.com today • Terrorism • U.S.
April 16th, 2013
03:34 AM ET

Police review London Marathon security plans

The security plan in place for the London Marathon this weekend will be reviewed following the deadly bomb blasts in Boston, London's Metropolitan Police said Tuesday.

"We will be reviewing our security arrangements in partnership with London Marathon," said event commander Chief Supt. Julia Pendry.

Police and race organizers said they are working closely together on security arrangements for Sunday's race, which attracts tens of thousands of competitors and spectators each year.

The organizers of the London Marathon said they expected the event "will go ahead as originally scheduled."

FULL STORY
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Filed under: Security • Terrorism • United Kingdom
March 25th, 2013
01:57 PM ET

U.S. announces terror suspect's plea deal - made in 2011

A man accused of having ties to two terrorist groups pleaded guilty in December 2011 and has been cooperating with the government, the Justice Department revealed Monday.

Ahmed Abdulkadir Warsame pleaded guilty to nine terrorism charges and could go to prison for the rest of his life.

He was a leader of the Somali terror group Al-Shabaab and arranged a weapons deal with the Yemen-based al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, according to the U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York.

FULL STORY
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Filed under: Al Qaeda • Crime • Terrorism
March 20th, 2013
03:54 PM ET

U.S. offers $5M bounties for alleged American terrorists in Somalia

The State Department has put a multimillion-dollar bounty on the heads of two Americans who the United States claims belong to an al Qaeda affiliate in Somalia, CNN has learned.

Posters and matchbooks in Somali and English emblazoned with the names and pictures of Omar Shafik Hammami and Jehad Serwan Mostafa tout rewards up to $5 million each for information leading to their arrest or conviction. Both men are on the FBI's Most Wanted Terrorists List.

FULL STORY
March 20th, 2013
02:29 PM ET

Saudi native charged with fighting for al Qaeda

A federal grand jury in New York has indicted a Saudi native on charges of joining al Qaeda in fighting U.S. forces in Afghanistan and conspiring to bomb U.S. diplomatic facilities in Nigeria.

Ibrahim Suleiman Adnan Adam Harun, also known as "Spin Ghul," was extradited from Italy to the United States in October.

The six-count indictment accuses him of, among other things, joining al Qaeda after arriving in Afghanistan in 2001, fighting U.S. and coalition troops in Afghanistan in 2002 and 2003, and traveling to Africa "with the intent to conduct attacks on U.S. diplomatic facilities in Nigeria," according to the office of the U.S attorney for the Eastern District of New York.

FULL STORY
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Filed under: Al Qaeda • New York • Nigeria • Saudi Arabia • Terrorism
Islamists claim Iraq anniversary attacks
March 20th, 2013
04:54 AM ET

Islamists claim Iraq anniversary attacks

An al-Qaeda affiliate claimed responsibility Wednesday for a chain of 24 bombings and two gun attacks in Iraq a day earlier, as the death toll rose to 61.

A statement attributed to the Islamic State of Iraq appeared on extremist websites, calling Tuesday's carnage "retaliation" against Shiite members in government.

Though Iraq has grown safer in the last six years, sectarian violence and instability still grip the country 10 years after the start of the U.S.-led war.

FULL STORY
Months after shooting, Malala at school
Malala Yousafzai, 15, waves as she is discharged from a hospital in central England earlier this year.
March 19th, 2013
01:47 PM ET

Months after shooting, Malala at school

For the first time since the Taliban shot her five months ago, Pakistani teenager Malala Yousafzai has done what made her a target of the would-be assassins: She's gone to school.

The 15-year-old on Tuesday attended Edgbaston High School in Birmingham, England, the city in which doctors treated her after she received initial care in Pakistan, a public relations agency working with her announced.

FULL STORY
March 18th, 2013
12:14 PM ET

10 killed in suicide car bombing in Mogadishu

At least 10 people were killed and 15 wounded in a suicide bombing of a bus outside the National Theatre in the Somali capital of Mogadishu on Monday, the prime minister's office said.

A suicide bomber drove a car with explosives into the bus, according to the office of Prime Minister Abdi Farah Shirdon.

FULL STORY

Filed under: Somalia • Terrorism
March 15th, 2013
06:09 AM ET

U.N.: Drones kill innocent people

A group of farmers is on its way to tend to crops. Suddenly, a missile slams into its midst, thrusting shrapnel in all directions.

A CIA drone, flying so high that the farmers can't see it, has killed most of them. None of them were militants.

It's a common scenario, a United Nations human rights researcher said Friday in a statement on drone strikes in Pakistan's tribal region of North Waziristan.

FULL STORY
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Filed under: Aviation • Military • Militia • Pakistan • Taliban • Terrorism • United Nations • World Update
Militants kill 5 in Kashmir attack
Indian paramilitary personnel carry away a fallen comrade in Srinagar on Wednesday.
March 13th, 2013
04:55 AM ET

Militants kill 5 in Kashmir attack

Militants killed five Indian officers at a police training camp in Indian-controlled Kashmir province on Wednesday, police said.

It was the first attack in the city of Srinagar in at least three years, CNN's sister network IBN reported.

It comes a month after the execution in India of a militant from Kashmir, who led an attack on the nation's parliament in 2001, killing nine people.

FULL STORY
Al Qaeda says it attacked Syrian convoy
Gunmen attacked a convoy ferrying Syrian soldiers near the western Iraqi town of Ar Rutbah.
March 11th, 2013
03:25 AM ET

Al Qaeda says it attacked Syrian convoy

Al Qaeda is claiming responsibility for the destruction of a Syrian Army convoy in western Iraq last week that killed some 48 Syrians and nine Iraqi soldiers.

The militant group released a statement on jihadist forums Monday.

The group claims it intercepted the convoy while the Syrian troops were on their way to camps secretly provided by the Iraqi government.

FULL STORY

Filed under: Al Qaeda • Iraq • Syria
Karzai: Blast shows Taliban serving 'foreigners'
Afghan President Hamid Karzai made his comments Sunday in Kabul at a gathering to mark International Women's Day.
March 10th, 2013
11:42 AM ET

Karzai: Blast shows Taliban serving 'foreigners'

Afghan President Hamid Karzai took aim at both the Taliban and the United States on Sunday in remarks likely to sour his already strained relations with Washington during a visit by U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel.

A deadly blast Saturday in the Afghan capital, Karzai said, showed that the "Taliban are serving the foreigners and are not against the foreigner."

The Taliban claimed responsibility for Saturday's attack at the Afghan Ministry of Defense in Kabul, which killed at least nine people and wounded 14 others. A Taliban spokesman expressed pleasure with Hagel's proximity at the time, calling the attack "a message to him."

NATO's International Security Assistance Force rejected suggestions that the Taliban even knew of Hagel's trip when they planned the operation.

FULL STORY
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Filed under: Afghanistan • Taliban
Officials: Bin Laden's son-in-law captured
This frame grab from the Saudi-owned television network MBC shows Suleiman Abu Ghaith.
March 7th, 2013
12:14 PM ET

Officials: Bin Laden's son-in-law captured

[Updated at 3:28 p.m. ET] Osama bin Laden's son-in-law, who has served as an al Qaeda spokesman, was captured and has been brought to the United States, two administration officials and a federal law enforcement official said Thursday.

Sulaiman Abu Ghaith is being held in New York, and will appear in court Friday to face federal charges, the law enforcement official said.

A sealed indictment lays out charges against him, the administration officials said.

FULL STORY
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