September 23rd, 2013
01:23 PM ET

2 presumed dead in Navy chopper accident

Two crew members who went missing when their helicopter went into the Red Sea on Sunday are believed to be dead, the U.S. Navy said Monday.

Search and rescue efforts for the two, who were in a MH-605 Knighthawk helicopter, have been suspended, the Navy said. The sea lies between Africa and the Arabian Peninsula.

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Filed under: Bahrain
August 14th, 2013
05:10 AM ET

Opposition plans mass protests in Bahrain

Two years of simmering unrest could boil over Wednesday as Bahraini protesters plan to flood the streets to demand reform.

The anti-government opposition bloc has called for mass demonstrations in the tiny island kingdom, trying to reignite an uprising in which the majority Shiite population protested against the ruling Sunni minority.

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Filed under: Bahrain • World
June 14th, 2012
12:05 PM ET

Bahrain acquits 9 medics, upholds convictions of 11 for roles in unrest

Bahrain on Thursday acquitted nine medical professionals who were accused of involvement in unrest in the country but upheld convictions of another 11.

All 20 were convicted last year of attempting to overthrow the government and were sentenced to lengthy prison terms.

Bahrain sliced the sentences of many whose convictions were upheld Thursday.

Of the 11 whose convictions stand, two are at large, five will be released on time served and the other four can appeal their sentences again, the Bahrain Information Affairs Authority announced.

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Filed under: Bahrain
June 7th, 2012
09:26 AM ET

Bahrain envoy to France denies assaulting staff

Bahrain's ambassador to France has denied accusations of assault after the French Foreign Ministry confirmed that a formal complaint had been made against a foreign envoy.

The diplomat, Nasser Al-Belooshi "forcefully" denied allegations made by former employees, calling them "inaccurate and unfounded," according to the official Bahrain News Agency.

The ambassador "remains at the disposal of the French authorities to shed light on these false accusations," the news agency said Wednesday.

The denial came a day after French Foreign Ministry spokesman Bernard Valero said a prosecutor in the city of Nanterre had opened an investigation against an ambassador. Valero did not name the envoy or say what country he came from.

 

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Filed under: Bahrain • Crime • France
April 23rd, 2012
02:59 AM ET

Bahraini dissident on hunger strike could appeal life sentence

A detained Bahraini dissident who has been on a hunger strike for more than two months can appeal his life sentence during a hearing Monday, the government said.

Abdulhadi al-Khawaja was arrested in April 2011 for his role in anti-government protests that began a month earlier with demands for political reform and greater freedoms for Shiites. In June, Bahrain found him and seven other Shiite opposition activists guilty of plotting to overthrow the country's royal family.

Al-Khawaja was in stable condition Sunday, a Bahraini government spokesman said.

Meanwhile, crew members from Britain's Channel 4 News were released Monday after they were arrested while covering the unrest surrounding the Bahrain Grand Prix a day earlier.

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Filed under: Arab Spring • Bahrain • World
April 3rd, 2012
09:08 AM ET

Bahrain hunger striker's life in danger, daughter says

Fears are growing that a leading human rights activist who entered the 55th day of a hunger strike in Bahrain on Tuesday may not survive the ordeal, his daughter says.

Abdulhadi al-Khawaja, who was arrested last year for his role in anti-government demonstrations, has been on hunger strike for nearly eight weeks in protest at his life prison term.

His daughter, Maryam al-Khawaja, told CNN he "is entering a critical phase where his life is at stake."

She said her father had two doctors accompanying him at all times Monday night and was being moved to a different prison Tuesday which has the necessary medical equipment.

The move is due to fears that he may go into a coma at any time, as his blood sugar and blood pressure have both further dropped, she said.

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Filed under: Arab Spring • Bahrain • Human rights
March 20th, 2012
04:09 AM ET

Bahrain king to receive report on changes after crackdown

King Hamad bin Isa al-Khalifa of Bahrain is expected Tuesday to receive a report on the implementation of recommended changes to the Middle Eastern state's laws and security forces in the aftermath of unrest last spring.

In November, Bahrain's Independent Commission of Inquiry issued a report that was highly critical of the authorities' reaction to the protests, which began in February 2011 - spurred by uprisings in Tunisia and Egypt.

The demonstrations failed to gain the traction of other Arab Spring uprisings following a crackdown by the authorities in the island state - backed by troops from nearby Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates.

The independent commission, set up by the king, concluded that the police had used excessive force and torture in their response to the protests.

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Bahrain police condemned over human rights abuses
Bahraini Shiite mourners chant slogans during the funeral of a man killed during anti-government demonstrators in March.
November 23rd, 2011
09:46 AM ET

Bahrain police condemned over human rights abuses

Police used excessive force and torture against civilians arrested during protests earlier this year, an independent commission set up by Bahrain's king, Hamad al-Khalifa, found Wednesday.

Abuses of detainees included beatings with metal pipes and batons, threats of rape and electrocution, commission chairman Prof. Mahmoud Cherif Bassiouni said.

The mistreatment included physical and psychological torture, he said, intended to extract information or to punish those held by security forces.

Bahrain should set up an independent body to investigate complaints of killings and torture during the pro-democracy protests earlier this year, Bassiouni said, and all those involved in human rights abuses should be held accountable, no matter how high their position.

The highly critical report by the Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry also recommended a series of reforms to the country's law and better training of its security forces.

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Filed under: Arab Spring • Bahrain
November 12th, 2011
04:13 PM ET

Bahrain arrests five suspects in alleged terror plot

Bahraini authorities discovered "a terror cell" and have arrested five people for allegedly planning attacks against government and diplomatic buildings as well as unidentified individuals, officials said Saturday.

The discovery of the alleged plot began when Qatari security authorities arrested four Bahrainis who entered Qatar from neighboring Saudi Arabia, said a Bahrain Ministry of Interior spokesman.

The suspects were carrying documents and a laptop "containing sensitive security information and details about some places and vital establishments in Bahrain, as well as airline bookings to Syria," the spokesman's statement said. The suspects were also carrying a "significant" amount of U.S. dollars and Iranian toman, the spokesman said.

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October 7th, 2011
07:41 AM ET

Bahrain announces investigation into death of teen protester

Bahraini authorities opened an investigation Friday into the death of a 16-year-old anti-government protester after conflicting reports emerged about how he died.

The Interior Ministry said hospital workers reported the teen died Thursday of heart failure, while a forensic autopsy report by the attorney general found he died of a gunshot wound, according to an official statement released to Bahrain's state-run news agency.

"An immediate investigation has been issued on the impact of the death of Ahmed al-Jaber to determine the circumstances of death," the statement said.

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October 5th, 2011
09:39 AM ET

Bahrain opposition keeps up hunger strike

Bahraini opposition leaders, many sentenced to life in prison, are 12 days into a hunger strike dedicated to gaining the release of "innocent women and girls" from jail, the son of one of the leaders told CNN Wednesday.

Dozens of activists have been jailed and sentenced to prison during recent political unrest, including Hassan Mushaimaa, the secretary-general of the banned opposition Haq group.

"We are really worried about his health," said his son, Mohamed Mushaimaa. "They won't let us talk with him very often." Phone calls are allowed every week, he said.

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September 1st, 2011
08:21 AM ET

Anger fills Bahrain streets ahead of boy's funeral

Bahrain's interior ministry is offering a reward for information leading to the killer of a 14-year-old boy whose death has fueled protests, the state news agency reported Thursday.

Witnesses said Wednesday they saw Ali Jawad al-Sheikh collapse after riot police fired a tear-gas round at him and other protesters in Sitra, southwest of the capital Manama.

But the Interior Ministry said no clashes were taking place at the time the boy was injured, saying that the last reported incident of unrest in the area was around 1:15 a.m. Wednesday.

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June 24th, 2011
01:41 PM ET

Arab Unrest: Middle East and North Africa, country by country

Countries in the Middle East and North Africa have been swept up in protests against longtime rulers since the January revolt that ousted Tunisian strongman Zine El Abidine Ben Ali. In many cases, these demonstrations and movements have been met with brute force and escalated into seemingly unending violence. Here are the latest developments from each country and information about the roots of the unrest.

SYRIA

The European Council on Friday condemned "in the strongest possible terms the ongoing repression and unacceptable and shocking violence the Syrian regime continues to apply against its own citizens."

"By choosing a path of repression instead of fulfilling its own promises on broad reforms, the regime is calling its legitimacy into question," the council said.

Demonstrators took to the streets Friday after Muslim prayers, as they had on past Fridays in recent weeks. Protests were held in various locations, including Hama, Homs, Deir El Zour, Idlib, Qameshli, Latakia, and in neighborhoods of Damascus, according to Rami Abdelrahman, head of the London-based Syria Observatory for Human Rights.

GPS: Why the odds are against the protesters in Syria

The group reported 11 deaths: 10 in Friday demonstrations and one death from injuries suffered in a demonstration a few days ago.

Damascus streets contrast sharply with border chaos

On Thursday, the alliance voted to expand sanctions against Syria by freezing the assets of seven people and four businesses with connections to the regime. Among those sanctioned were three commanders in Iran's Revolutionary Guard Corps accused of helping the "regime suppress protests" and "providing equipment and support" to the government, according to the European Union Official Journal.

Abdelrahman said that in al-Kasweh, in the province of Damascus, security forces fired at protesters, resulting in injuries. Estimated deaths have exceeded 1,600, he said, with 1,316 civilians and 341 soldiers and security forces killed.

An estimated 10,000 people have been jailed, Abdelrahman said, but that number is fluid because there have been many releases and new detentions. The military crackdown has spurred the flight of refugees from Syria into Turkey.

At least 11,739 refugees are now in Turkey, the Hatay governor's office in Turkey said Friday.

Roots of unrest: The unrest began in mid-March after teens were arrested for writing anti-government graffiti in Daraa, according to Amnesty International. As the crackdown intensified, demonstrators changed their demands from calls for freedom and an end to abuses by the security forces to calls for the regime's overthrow. On April 19, Syria's Cabinet lifted an emergency law that had been in effect since 1963. But security forces then moved quickly to crack down. Government opponents allege massive human rights abuses.

The International Committee of the Red Cross has chartered ships to ferry people cut off from their families since war erupted four months ago.

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Arab Unrest: Middle East and North Africa, country by country
Syrian refugees make their way to the Turkish border. The U.N. said 10,000 Syrians have fled into neighboring countries.
June 15th, 2011
10:07 AM ET

Arab Unrest: Middle East and North Africa, country by country

Countries in the Middle East and North Africa have been swept up in protests against longtime rulers since the January revolt that ousted Tunisian strongman Zine El Abidine Ben Ali. In many cases, these demonstrations and movements have been met with brute force and escalated into seemingly unending violence.

Here are the latest developments from each country and information on the roots of the unrest.

SYRIA

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan plans to huddle with a special Syrian envoy on Wednesday in an effort to help stem the growing tide of refugees racing into Turkey from conflict-wracked Syria. The number of Syrians who have crossed the border now stands at 8,421, according to Turkey's disaster and emergency management directorate.

CNN reporter, briefly in Syria, hears 'horror' stories

That flight has been spurred by violence and a military offensive in the conflict-scarred country, and Turkey is worried that the border crisis could deteriorate and destabilize the region.

Of the refugees, 4,368 are children and 73 Syrians are now being treated in Turkish hospitals, the emergency directorate said. More than 1,230 tents have been set up in a number of locations.

Actress Angelina Jolie, a longtime goodwill ambassador for the U.N. refugee agency, has submitted an application to visit the refugees in Turkey, Turkish Foreign Ministry spokesman Selcuk Unal confirmed to CNN by phone. He says the government is "evaluating" the request.

GPS: The consequences of Syrian refugees in Turkey

Roots of Unrest: More than 1,100 people may have died since the unrest began in mid-March after teens were arrested for writing anti-government graffiti in Daraa, according to Amnesty International. As the crackdown intensified, demonstrators changed their demands from calls for "freedom," "dignity" and an end to abuses by the security forces to calls for the regime's overthrow. On April 19, Syria's Cabinet lifted an emergency law, which had been in effect since 1963. But security forces then moved quickly to crack down. Government opponents allege massive human rights abuses.

Analysis: Why U.N. won't act against Syria

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Latest developments: Middle East and North Africa unrest
Yemeni anti-government demonstrators call for the ousting of President Ali Abdullah Saleh during protests on Thursday.
June 2nd, 2011
01:07 PM ET

Latest developments: Middle East and North Africa unrest

[Updated at 1:07 p.m.] Countries in the Middle East and North Africa have been swept up in protests against longtime rulers since the January revolt that ousted Tunisian strongman Zine El Abedine Ben Ali. In many cases, these demonstrations and movements have been met with brute force and escalated into seemingly unending violence.

Here's a look at what's next for the 'Arab Spring' and look at the latest developments from each country and information on the roots of unrest.

BAHRAIN

After state-of-emergency laws that had allowed for a crackdown on opposition leaders and journalists were lifted Wednesday it was thought to be an effort to signal an end to months of civil unrest.

As the state of emergency was lifted, protesters gathered across Bahrain, in locations including Aldiraz, Daih, Bani Jamrah, Karzakan, Abo Qowa, Duraz and Sitra, according to Nabeel Rajab, a prominent Bahraini human rights activist.

Rajab said peaceful protesters were attacked by security forces with tear gas and rubber bullets, causing injuries but no deaths. The demonstrations were dispersed soon after they started, he said.

On Tuesday, Bahrain's King Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa appealed for dialogue, saying that talks with opposition groups are scheduled to begin in July.

GPS: How radical are Bahrain's Shia?

Bahrain warns against state protests

Roots of Unrest:

Protesters initially took to the streets of Manama to demand reform and the introduction of a constitutional monarchy. But some are now calling for the removal of the royal family, which has led the Persian Gulf state since the 18th century. Young members of the country's Shiite Muslim majority have staged protests to complain about discrimination, unemployment and corruption, issues they say the country's Sunni rulers have done little to address.

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Breaking down Middle East and North Africa unrest, country by country
Protests have erupted against regimes in Bahrain, top left, Libya, top right, Yemen, bottom right, and Syria, bottom left.
June 1st, 2011
11:00 AM ET

Breaking down Middle East and North Africa unrest, country by country

Countries in the Middle East and North Africa have been swept up in protests against longtime rulers since the January revolt that ousted Tunisian strongman Zine El Abedine Ben Ali. In many cases, these demonstrations and movements have been met with brute force and escalated into seemingly unending violence.

We take a look at what's next for the 'Arab Spring,' the roots of unrest from country to country, and look at the latest developments going on.

BAHRAIN

On Wednesday, Bahrain lifted state-of-emergency laws that had allowed for a crackdown on opposition leaders and journalists, while warning against anti-government activity.

The announcement by the country's Information Affairs Authority followed one from the justice ministry the day before, warning against "any type of activities that could affect the security or harm the national peace and safety."

The lifting of the emergency laws, imposed in mid-March, is thought to be an effort to signal an end to months of civil unrest.

On Tuesday, Bahrain's King Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa appealed for dialogue, saying that talks with opposition groups are scheduled to begin in July.

GPS: How radical are Bahrain's Shia?

Bahrain warns against state protests

Roots of Unrest:

Protesters initially took to the streets of Manama to demand reform and the introduction of a constitutional monarchy. But some are now calling for the removal of the royal family, which has led the Persian Gulf state since the 18th century.

Young members of the country's Shiite Muslim majority have staged protests to complain about discrimination, unemployment and corruption, issues they say the country's Sunni rulers have done little to address.

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Monday's Most Intriguing: Bernanke, Bahrain's prince, 'The Elders'
Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke will hold the first ever press conference by a Fed Chair on Wednesday.
April 25th, 2011
12:03 PM ET

Monday's Most Intriguing: Bernanke, Bahrain's prince, 'The Elders'

BEN BERNANKE

The Federal Reserve's board convenes on Tuesday with Chairman Bernanke taking an unprecedented risk. On Wednesday, he'll hold the first-ever press conference by a Fed Chairman. The entire world—particularly the Fed itself—will assess every word, the Wall Street Journal's David Wessel told NPR this morning. Bernanke feels this transparency is needed, given the public mistrust after the financial crisis. At the same time, the slightest misstep by Bernanke would cause a market tumble, said Wessel adding that this move will change the role of fed chair forever. Charisma will now be a required skill set for any future Federal Reserve chair, he said. Read Time magazine's intimate portrait of Bernanke, who was Man of the Year in 2009.

PRINCE SALMAN bin HAMAD Al-KHALIFA

Bahrain's Crown Prince is sending his regrets to Britain's Prince William, stating that he must decline an invite to the royal wedding due to unrest in his country. The decision was delayed until the last minute, Prince Salman wrote, because he'd hoped violence would have subsided. There have been accounts of human rights violations across Bahrain. Go here for more on the latest from Bahrain.

THE ELDERS

Four members of the group for former world leaders announced in Beijing this morning that they will travel to North Korea in hopes of restoring dialogue between that country and South Korea. Former President Jimmy Carter, Finland's Martti Ahtisaari, Ireland's Mary Robinson, and the former Norwegian Prime Minister Gro Brundtland are traveling to Pyongyang at the invitation of Kim John Il's government, Carter said. North Korea's critically low food supply and South Korea will be discussed. "Clearly there is a great level of mistrust and suspicion between North and South Korea," Ahtisaari said. "But the stakes are too high to allow this standoff to continue."

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N. Africa, Mideast protests: Egypt's new prime minister says he is 'of the people'
Anti-government protesters pray Friday in Benghazi, Libya, during a call to arms to join the fight against the government forces of President Muammar Gaddafi.
March 4th, 2011
10:51 PM ET

N. Africa, Mideast protests: Egypt's new prime minister says he is 'of the people'

Across the Middle East and North Africa, CNN's reporters and iReporters are covering protests, many of them inspired by revolts in Tunisia and Egypt that toppled those countries' longtime rulers. Check out our interactive map explaining the roots of the unrest in each country and full coverage of the situation in Libya. Have a story to tell from the scene? Click here to send an iReport. CNN's Fareed Zakaria breaks down what the movements toward democracy mean.

Developments on unrest in the Middle East and North Africa:

[LIBYA 9:06 p.m. ET, 4:06 a.m. local] Egypt's new prime minister, Essam Sharaf, appeared before thousands of protesters at Cairo's Tahrir Square on Friday, telling them he is "of the people" and would resign if he failed to meet their demands. Sharaf, Egypt's former transportation minister, was sworn in Friday after the resignation of Ahmed Shafik, the last prime minister appointed by Hosni Mubarak.

[LIBYA 6:00 p.m. ET, 1:00 a.m. local] The United Nations said Friday it is studying Libya's request to install a more loyal diplomat as its ambassador. A letter from Libya's government asked that former Foreign Minister Ali Abdussalam Treki be approved as its envoy. Treki, who recently served as the president of the U.N. General Assembly, would replace Mohamed Shalgham as ambassador in New York.

[LIBYA 2:16 p.m. ET, 9:16 p.m. local] Libyan government spokesman Majid al-Dursi told CNN that "Zawiya has been captured, Zawiya has been liberated."

Battalions of forces loyal to Moammar Gadhafi attacked protesters with mortars and machine guns as they were demonstrating in the city's Martyrs Square, eyewitnesses said. The troops also assaulted an ambulance and killed people who fell wounded.

"Civilians were killed but we can not say how many. We buried nine people so far," the witness said. "The attack was indescribable. Direct gunfire was opened on people."

[SAUDI ARABIA, 12:04 p.m. ET, 8:04 p.m. local] A second protest unfolded in Riyadh after Friday prayer, according to two Saudi activists who requested they not be identified because of concerns for their safety.

As many as 40 anti-government demonstrators gathered outside Al-Rajhi Mosque for a short protest. At least one man involved in organizing the protest was arrested, the activists said.

The activists said the protesters attracted a crowd of worshipers leaving the mosque. Some of the protesters carried signs showing a map of Saudi Arabia that did not contain the words "Kingdom of Saudi Arabia," an affront to the Saudi royal family.

[LIBYA, 11:56 a.m. ET, 6:56 p.m. local] A witness said the Friday attack in Zawiya was an "indescribable" and deadly assault. The witness said forces loyal to Moammar Gadhafi attacked peaceful protesters in Zawiya with mortars and machine guns.

[LIBYA, 11:32 a.m. ET, 6:32 p.m. local] A C-130 cargo plane labeled with a U.S. flag landed in Tunisia, Libya, on Friday, CNN has learned.  Secretary of State Hillary Clinton stated Friday that two C-130 planes were en route to Tunisia to help with the humanitarian crisis in Libya.

[LIBYA, 11:02 a.m. ET, 6:02 p.m. local] At least 15 people have been killed and 200 wounded in the Libyan city of Zawiya, according to a doctor, who said "there is a river of blood" at the hospital where the injured are being treated.

Earlier, a report from Libyan State TV said that people in Zawiya, west of Tripoli, and "their public leadership have secured and took control over the city from the 'armed terrorist elements.'"

The doctor said wounded people started arriving at the hospital Friday morning, and most of the injuries are from gunshots.

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N. Africa, Mideast protests: Obama says U.S. aircraft to fly refugees out of border
March 3rd, 2011
06:43 PM ET

N. Africa, Mideast protests: Obama says U.S. aircraft to fly refugees out of border

Across the Middle East and North Africa, CNN's reporters and iReporters are covering protests, many of them inspired by revolts in Tunisia and Egypt that toppled those countries' longtime rulers. Check out our interactive map explaining the roots of the unrest in each country and full coverage of the situation in Libya. Have a story to tell from the scene? Click here to send an iReport. CNN's Fareed Zakaria breaks down what the movements toward democracy mean.

Developments on unrest in the Middle East and North Africa:

[LIBYA, 6:43 p.m. ET, 1:43 a.m. local] U.S. military aircraft and French charter jets joined efforts to get tens of thousands of people fleeing the fighting in Libya back home Thursday as the United Nations called for stepped-up aid to refugees.

Nearly 180,000 people, mainly foreign workers, have fled to the neighboring nations of Tunisia and Egypt amid fighting between government troops and rebels pushing to oust longtime strongman Moammar Gadhafi, the U.N. refugee agency reported. About 95,000 people have crossed into Tunisia and another 83,000 into Egypt, the office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees estimated.

[LIBYA, 1:38 p.m. ET, 8:38 p.m. local] President Barack Obama said Thursday he approved the use of U.S. military aircraft to help return to Egypt those Egyptian citizens who have fled to Tunisia to escape unrest in neighboring Libya.

[LIBYA, 7:14 a.m. ET, 2:14 p.m. local] Luis Moreno-Ocampo, the International Criminal Court prosecutor, said the body is investigating Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi and other government officials for crimes against humanity.

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N. Africa, Mideast protests: 4 killed in fighting in al-Brega, Libya
Libyan rebels in the city of Ajdibaya get ready for a fight after a government jet flies over them Wednesday.
March 2nd, 2011
03:55 PM ET

N. Africa, Mideast protests: 4 killed in fighting in al-Brega, Libya

Across the Middle East and North Africa, CNN's reporters and iReporters are covering protests, many of them inspired by revolts in Tunisia and Egypt that toppled those countries' longtime rulers. Check out our interactive map explaining the roots of the unrest in each country and full coverage of the situation in Libya. Have a story to tell from the scene? Click here to send an iReport. CNN's Fareed Zakaria breaks down what the movements toward democracy mean.

Developments on unrest in the Middle East and North Africa:

[LIBYA, 3:55 p.m. ET, 10:55 p.m.]The USS Ponce and the USS Kearsarge have traversed the Suez Canal and entered the Mediterranean, a U.S. official said. The two ships have been sent with humanitarian relief equipment to aid in Libyan relief and evacuation efforts. The ships join the USS Stout, USS Barry and the USS Mount Whitney in the Mediterranean.

[LIBYA, 10:11 a.m. ET, 5:11 p.m.] At least four people have been killed and 23 have been wounded in the fighting Wednesday between pro-Gadhafi forces and the opposition in the town of al-Brega, a doctor who runs a hospital in the area told CNN.

[LIBYA, 9:37 a.m. ET,  4:37 p.m. local] The International Criminal Court prosecutor, Luis Moreno-Ocampo, is opening an investigation into the situation in Libya, the court said in a statement Wednesday.

[LIBYA, 9:09 a.m. ET, 4:09 local] Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi abrubtly ended a 2-hour, 20-minute speech by saying, "The American president will leave office, the European leaders will leave their offices, and Gadhafi will still be a leader."

[LIBYA, 9:03 a.m. ET, 4:03 p.m. local] Two hours into his speech, Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi mentioned President Obama.

"I think Obama is quite reasonable," he said. "He is not a yankee like Bush or Clinton, he's a reasonable person. He's capable to avoid another Iraq or Afghanistan. ... (However,) if they want to challenge us, we accept the challenge. Then we will distribute arms to 2 or 3 million and we won't care about killing them. We will defend the honor of all our innocent people. ... We will enter an honorable battle."

Gadhafi said if his country's rebellion cannot be resolved peacefully, "we'll see what can be done."

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