September 1st, 2013
05:32 PM ET

Egypt to try former President Mohamed Morsy for inciting murder

Former Egyptian President Mohamed Morsy will stand trial on charges of incitement to conduct murder and "thuggery" relating to clashes near the presidential palace late last year, state-run MENA reported Sunday.

The country's general prosecutor ordered Morsy to stand trial along with 14 members of the Muslim Brotherhood, the news agency said.

No date was given for the trial.

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Filed under: Egypt
August 20th, 2013
03:10 AM ET

Official: U.S. holds up some Egypt aid

The Obama administration is "reprogramming" some funds to Egypt while a review is underway - in effect, temporarily holding up some military aid to the country, a U.S. official said.

A spokesman for Senator Patrick Leahy, David Carle, confirmed to CNN his office has been told the aid has been halted. The Vermont Democrat is chairman of the Appropriations State and Foreign Operations Subcommittee.

But the U.S. official emphasized no decision has been made to permanently halt the aid.

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Filed under: Egypt • U.S. • World
August 19th, 2013
05:47 AM ET

Muslim Brotherhood: More protests called

The Muslim Brotherhood has called for continued protests Monday as authorities remain determined to derail their plans.

But a spate of fresh violence is compounding Egypt's turmoil, including the deaths of 36 Muslim Brotherhood prisoners and an attack that left 25 Egyptian soldiers dead.

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Filed under: Egypt
August 19th, 2013
04:53 AM ET

Egypt: 25 soldiers killed in Sinai Peninsula

Suspected militants armed with rocket-propelled grenades killed at least 25 Egyptian soldiers in the border city of Rafah, state-run Nile TV reported Monday.

The assailants struck two buses carrying security forces in the Sinai Peninsula. At least two other solders were injured, Nile TV said.

Sinai Peninsula is a lawless area that has been the site of frequent attacks even before Egypt's latest round of turmoil.

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Filed under: Egypt • World
August 18th, 2013
06:23 AM ET

Egypt: Officials blame terrorists for chaos

Egypt's interim government implored the global community to listen to its side after days of deadly violence across the country.

Members of the foreign ministry showed a video-and-photo montage Sunday of recent carnage, blaming terrorists for the chaos. The foreign ministry also lambasted international media, saying outlets have been sympathetic to protesters who support ousted President Mohamed Morsy and the Muslim Brotherhood.

But supporters of Morsy have said Egyptian security forces instigated the violence that has killed hundreds in recent days, starting with a dawn raid at two pro-Morsy protest camps last week.

The bloody impasse between those who want Morsy back in power and the country's military-backed interim government could get uglier Sunday.

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Filed under: Egypt • World
What will the U.S. do about Egypt?
August 15th, 2013
04:26 AM ET

What will the U.S. do about Egypt?

When Egypt's first democratically elected president was tossed out earlier this year, the White House stopped short of calling it a coup.

Doing so would force an end to the $1.3 billion that the U.S. sends in military aid every year - and change the course of its relationship with one of its strongest Arab allies in the region.

But that was before Wednesday when the military-led interim government stormed two camps full of former President Mohamed Morsy's supporters. More than 300 people were killed and close to 3,000 wounded in the bloodiest day in Egypt's recent history.

Will the carnage in Egypt change the U.S. policy toward the most populous Arab country?

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Filed under: Barack Obama • Egypt • Politics • U.S. • World
August 14th, 2013
03:41 PM ET

Egypt sees bloodiest day since 2011 revolt

Military raids on protest camps and vicious battles that followed left scores dead Wednesday in Cairo, starting a new turn in the tumultuous cycle that has rocked Egypt for more than two years.

Clashes between Egyptian security forces and supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsy made it the country's bloodiest single day since the 2011 revolution that ousted the previous president, longtime strongman Hosni Mubarak.

"It's an open war," said one protester who managed to escape one of the two protest camps.

At least 149 people were killed and more than 1,400 were wounded, state TV reported. Interim Interior Minister Gen. Mohammed Ibrahim said later Wednesday that 43 police officers had died in the violence.

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Morsy supporters may see fierce crackdown
August 12th, 2013
02:49 AM ET

Morsy supporters may see fierce crackdown

Now that Ramadan and the Muslim festival of Eid are over, staunch supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsy are on edge.

Thousands have camped out in the streets of Cairo for more than a month, refusing to budge until Egypt's first democratically elected president is reinstated. But the possibility of a fierce crackdown looms.

On Sunday, when asked about a possible dispersal, an interior ministry source said "all options are on the table," the state-run Ahram Online news site reported. The source added that security forces have beefed up their presence recently near the demonstrations.

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Filed under: Egypt • Politics • World
Pro-Morsy group calls for million-man march
Morsy supporters rally this week in Cairo.
August 1st, 2013
02:27 PM ET

Pro-Morsy group calls for million-man march

A group supporting deposed Egyptian President Mohamed Morsy have called for a million-man march from 33 different mosques Friday following noon prayers under the banner of "Egypt against the coup," according to a statement released Thursday by the Anti-Coup Prodemocracy Alliance.

They also called on "all free people in all countries of the world to demonstrate peacefully" in support of their marches, according to the statement.

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Egypt coup: Some shocked, some elated
A man with his face painted in Egyptian colors celebrates in Tahrir Square.
July 4th, 2013
12:19 AM ET

Egypt coup: Some shocked, some elated

  • Today, Egypt swore in an interim president, Adly Mansour
  • Deposed President Mohamed Morsy remains under house arrest
  • The Muslim Brotherhood says Morsy is cut off from communications
  • Tahrir Square is quiet, and some protesters are making plans to clean up the trash there
  • Refresh this page for the latest news we're seeing and hearing. Catch up with our full story here.

[Update 7:00 a.m. ET, 1:00 p.m. in Egypt] ...250...the number of arrest warrants for Muslim Brotherhood members in connection with killings in front of MB headquarters, which came under attack days ago.  Egypt's new prosecutor general, who Morsy had deposed, issued the warrants.

Muslim Brotherhood headquarters after they were attack.

[Updated at 6:50 a.m. ET, 12:50 p.m. in Egypt] Bahrain's King al-Khalifa, who has had to deal with his own popular uprising, enthusiastically congratulated interim President Adly Mansour "on taking over the reins of power in Egypt at this important time in history."  Iran's state-run Mehr News Agency gave Morsy a kick over his religious orientation on his way out: "Sunni Morsi immediately turned into a critical figure against the Iranian Shia government and has not allowed Iran to appoint an ambassador in Cairo."

[Updated at 5:28 a.m. ET, 11:28 a.m. in Egypt] Mansour says the Egyptian people have empowered him to "amend and correct" the revolution.

[Updated at 5:28 a.m. ET, 11:28 a.m. in Egypt] Who is interim President Adly Mansour?  His low-key demeanor might be the very reason the military picked him, analysts say. CNN's Faith Karimi explains.

[Updated at 5:11 a.m. ET, 11:11 a.m. in Egypt] Mansour appears before Egypt's assembly, prepares to speak.

[Updated at 5:11 a.m. ET, 11:11 a.m. in Egypt] Did Morsy's personal style rub Egyptians the wrong way and contribute to his downfall? Read this portrait of the deposed president by CNN's Laura Smith-Spark.

Also, "coup" or no "coup?" CNN's Christian Amanpour does not mince words:

[Updated at 4:50 a.m. ET, 10:50 a.m. in Egypt] Reactions have been pouring in from world leaders. Most of them are along the same lines: carefully formulated, and express respect for the will of the Egyptian people. Among the countries that have sent in reactions are Morocco, Jordan ....

[Updated at 4:38 a.m. ET, 10:38 a.m. in Egypt] CNN's Ian Lee reporting in front of the high court: This is the same place, where Mosry was installed just a year ago.

[Updated at 4:34 a.m. ET, 10:34 a.m. in Egypt] Mansour remains chief justice, as well, Egyptian state TV reports.

[Updated at 4:28 a.m. ET, 10:28 a.m. in Egypt]  Interim Egyptian President Adly Mansour was sworn in in Cairo.

[Updated at 4:16 a.m. ET, 10:16 a.m. in Egypt] Two leading figures of the Muslim Brotherhood were arrested today, Egytian state radio reports. The former speaker of parliament and a member of the party's executive office were taken to Cairo's Torah prison.

[Updated at 4:10 a.m. ET, 10:10 a.m. in Egypt] Today, the European Union called on Egypt to go down the path of democracy, human rights and non-violence.  Its head of foreign affairs and security, Catherine Ashton, said:

"I welcome the peaceful manner in which most demonstrations have been conducted thus far, but I find continuing cases of sexual abuse of female protesters deeply troubling. I urge all sides to show restraint.... Confrontation cannot be a solution."

[Updated at 3:53 a.m. ET, 9:53 a.m. in Egypt]  Egypt's military has arrested Morsy and other members of the Muslim Brotherhood. It shut down pro-MB broadcasters and raided al Jazeera's Cairo office after it aired a statement by the deposed president.  Then army leaders say today that the military will protect Islamists from attacks and intimidation, state-run Nile TV reports.  And they say they will not shut any factions out of political life.  That brings up an interesting question:

[Updated at 2:52 a.m. ET, 8:52 a.m. in Egypt] Human Rights Watch weighs in on what the Muslim Brotherhood should do next:

[Updated at 2:41 a.m. ET, 8:41 a.m. in Egypt] Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas has said he is concerned about stability in Egypt but also respects the will of the people. He hopes Egypt will exit the current crisis stronger.

[Updated at 2:28 a.m. ET, 8:28 a.m. in Egypt]  Health officials say 32 people were killed in clashes in Egypt yesterday.

[Updated at 2:10 a.m. ET, 8:10 a.m. in Egypt] This is a statement from the UAE, which says it is "following with satisfaction" the developments in Egypt. In the UAE, the Muslim Brotherhood is a banned organization.

"H.H. Sheikh Abdullah bin Zayed Al Nahyan, said that the UAE has full confidence that the great people of Egypt will be able to overcome the current difficult moments that the country is experiencing in order to reach a safe and prosperous future. ...

"His Highness added that the great Egyptian army proves, once again, that it is the strong shield and the protector that guarantees that the country is a land of institutions and law that embraces all the components of the Egyptian people."

[Updated at 1:52 a.m. ET, 7:52 a.m. in Egypt] Instagram has put together a collection of the best photos and videos by its users.  View here

(from @AishaalShabrawy)

[Updated at 1:45 a.m. ET, 7:45 a.m. in Egypt] Morsy deprived the opposition of a political process, activist Ahmed El Hawary told CNN's Anderson Cooper. "We don't have - we didn't have any outlets or anyway to be heard unless we go down to the streets and chant our demands, and even though, he ignored us."

[Updated at 1:27 a.m. ET, 7:27 a.m. in Egypt] A popular image on the photo social media site Imgur, allegedly from Egypt.

[Updated at 12:19 a.m. ET Thursday, 6:19 a.m. in Egypt] Welcome to Thursday's Egypt live blog.  With Mohamed Morsy out of power, some of his opponents are making plans to clean up Tahrir Square, while his supporters say they will protest until he is reinstated as president.  CNN's Ben Wedeman, a veteran journalist, who was long based in Cairo, warns that there will likely be no calm after the storm of recent protests.

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Morsy arrested, Muslim Brotherhood spokesman says
Fireworks light the Cairo sky Wednesday as opponents of the now-ousted President Mohamed Morsy celebrate in Tahrir Square.
July 3rd, 2013
10:19 PM ET

Morsy arrested, Muslim Brotherhood spokesman says

  • Egypt's top military leader announces Wednesday night that President Mohamed Morsy has been removed from power
  • Head of Egypt's constitutional court will be temporary president until new constitution is drawn up and new elections can be held
  • The military demanded that Morsy share power with opponents after anti-government protests
  • Morsy, elected last year, refused to comply; mass protests continue to support him
  • Refresh this page for the latest news we're seeing and hearing. Catch up with our full story here.

[Updated at 11:52 p.m. ET, 5:52 a.m. in Egypt] Some 40 anti-Morsy protesters are planning to meet with cleaning equipment to polish up their former protest campground, Tahrir Square.  They have invited over 2,000 people to join them on Facebook

[Updated at 11:03 p.m. ET, 5:30 a.m. in Egypt] CNN's Jake Tapper outlines some fine points of Obama's reaction to the Egyptian military's actions:

President Obama’s statement Wednesday evening about the Egyptian military’s seizure of power from President Mohamed Morsy is as telling for what he doesn’t say as for what he does: he doesn’t mention the word “coup.” He doesn’t call upon the Egyptian military to restore power to the “democratically elected civilian government,” but rather to a“democratically elected civilian government” - in other words, it need not be Morsy’s.

The thinking of the president and senior Obama administration officials, according to a knowledgeable source, is that while the administration is not explicitly supporting the removal of Morsy from power - it expressly did not support the move - it is seeking to now push the Egyptian military in a direction.

If the Obama administration were to use the word “coup.” that would have legal ramifications that would result in the end of U.S. aid. If White House officials were to pull the plug completely, they would be removing themselves from the picture altogether.

[Updated at 10:19 p.m. ET, 4:19 a.m. in Egypt] CNN's Ben Wedeman, who spent time at a pro-Morsy rally in Cairo on Wednesday evening, reported he spoke to one protester who said he felt demonstrators would stay there "until Mohamed Morsy is once again president of Egypt."

Wedeman recalled the exchange early Thursday after leaving the pro-Morsy rally to go to the larger gathering at Cairo's Tahrir Square, where people still were celebrating Morsy's ouster.

Wedeman said that although much focus is on the joy and excitement at Tahrir Square, "there's a significant portion of the Egyptian population (although) I wouldn’t suggest it’s a majority who are very upset at what has happened."

Wedeman, a CNN senior international correspondent who'd previously served as CNN's Cairo bureau chief, said it appeared the overall mood in Egypt would be different than 2011, when then-President Hosni Mubarak was deposed. In 2011, Wedeman said, Mubarak's supporters kept a low profile for months.

"There's not going to be that quiet after the storm this time around," Wedeman said.

[Updated at 10:06 p.m. ET, 4:06 a.m. in Egypt] Get ready for an extremist backlash to Morsy's ouster, says Mohammed Ayoob, Michigan State University professor emeritus of international relations.

"The major lesson that Islamists in the Middle East are likely to learn from this episode is that they will not be allowed to exercise power no matter how many compromises they make in both the domestic and foreign policy arenas," Ayoob wrote for a CNN.com opinion piece. "This is likely to push a substantial portion of mainstream Islamists into the arms of the extremists who reject democracy and ideological compromise."

CNN's Ben Wedeman, reporting from Cairo, also said there's a danger that some members of the Muslim Brotherhood will break from the main group and "challenge (Egypt's new leaders) with violence."

They may take the attitude of "we tried to play the game, our leaders were jailed, our media have been shut down ... so we’re going to destroy the system," said Wedeman, who is a CNN senior international correspondent and had previously been CNN's Cairo bureau chief.

[Updated at 9:23 p.m. ET, 3:23 a.m. in Egypt] U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has echoed Obama's call for a quick return to civilian rule. He appealed for "calm, non-violence, dialogue and restraint."

[Updated at 8:24 p.m. ET, 2:24 a.m. in Egypt] More about arrests in Egypt, from CNN's interview with Muslim Brotherhood spokesman Gehad El-Haddad:

Morsy was arrested by presidential guards at their headquarters, and is being "cut off" from the world, El-Haddad told CNN. "They cut all his access, all his calls. No one is meeting him," the spokesman said.

Members of Morsy's presidential team also were arrested, El-Haddad said.

The head of Egypt's Freedom and Justice Party and the deputy leader of the Muslim Brotherhood also were arrested, according to El-Haddad.

El-Haddad told CNN he understands that hundreds of names have been put on an "arrest list," but "I can't confirm any arrests apart from these."

[Updated at 8:03 p.m. ET, 2:03 a.m. in Egypt] Muslim Brotherhood spokesman Gehad El-Haddad just confirmed his account of Morsy's arrest to CNN by phone.

Presidential guards arrested Morsy at the guards' headquarters, El-Haddad told CNN. He described it as "house arrest." He added that Morsy's presidential team was "entirely put under arrest as well."

[Updated at 7:42 p.m. ET, 1:42 a.m. in Egypt] Morsy is "under house arrest," as are most members of the presidential team, according to a post on Muslim Brotherhood spokesman Gehad El-Haddad's Twitter account.

Reuters also reported Morsy is being held by authorities, citing the Muslim Brotherhood and a security source.

[Updated at 7:27 p.m. ET, 1:27 a.m. in Egypt] At least eight people were killed and 343 were wounded in clashes across Egypt on Wednesday, the day the Egyptian military announced it had ousted Mohamed Morsy as president, according to the state-run al-Ahram news agency, citing the Health Ministry.

[Updated at 7:07 p.m. ET, 1:07 a.m. in Egypt] Egypt's military reportedly is attempting a massive roundup of members of the Muslim Brotherhood, the Islamist movement that helped propel Morsy to power a year ago.

Arrest warrants have been issued for 300 members of the Muslim Brotherhood, and an operation to arrest them is under way, according to the state-run Ahram newspaper website on Thursday, which cited an unnamed security source.

Egyptian security forces also have arrested the Muslim Brotherhood's political party leader, Saad el-Katatni, and its deputy, Rashad Al-Bayoumi, Egypt's official MENA news agency reported Wednesday, citing an unnamed military source.

[Updated at 6:57 p.m. ET, 12:57 a.m. in Egypt] U.S. President Barack Obama, in his first public statement on Morsy's ouster, says the United States is "deeply concerned by the decision of the Egyptian armed forces to remove President Morsy and suspend the Egyptian constitution," and that he has "directed the relevant departments and agencies to review the implications under U.S. law for our assistance to the government of Egypt."

Obama also called on the Egyptian military "to move quickly and responsibly to return full authority back to a democratically elected civilian government as soon as possible through an inclusive and transparent process, and to avoid arbitrary arrests of President Morsy and his supporters."

Here is the full statement, released moments ago by the White House:

"As I have said since the Egyptian revolution, the United States supports a set of core principles, including opposition to violence, protection of universal human rights, and reform that meets the legitimate aspirations of the people. The United States does not support particular individuals or political parties, but we are committed to the democratic process and respect for the rule of law. Since the current unrest in Egypt began, we have called on all parties to work together to address the legitimate grievances of the Egyptian people, in accordance with the democratic process, and without recourse to violence or the use of force.

"The United States is monitoring the very fluid situation in Egypt, and we believe that ultimately the future of Egypt can only be determined by the Egyptian people. Nevertheless, we are deeply concerned by the decision of the Egyptian Armed Forces to remove President Morsy and suspend the Egyptian constitution. I now call on the Egyptian military to move quickly and responsibly to return full authority back to a democratically elected civilian government as soon as possible through an inclusive and transparent process, and to avoid any arbitrary arrests of President Morsy and his supporters. Given today’s developments, I have also directed the relevant departments and agencies to review the implications under U.S. law for our assistance to the government of Egypt.

"The United States continues to believe firmly that the best foundation for lasting stability in Egypt is a democratic political order with participation from all sides and all political parties secular and religious, civilian and military. During this uncertain period, we expect the military to ensure that the rights of all Egyptian men and women are protected, including the right to peaceful assembly, due process, and free and fair trials in civilian courts. Moreover, the goal of any political process should be a government that respects the rights of all people, majority and minority; that institutionalizes the checks and balances upon which democracy depends; and that places the interests of the people above party or faction. The voices of all those who have protested peacefully must be heard including those who welcomed today’s developments, and those who have supported President Morsy. In the interim, I urge all sides to avoid violence and come together to ensure the lasting restoration of Egypt’s democracy.

"No transition to democracy comes without difficulty, but in the end it must stay true to the will of the people. An honest, capable and representative government is what ordinary Egyptians seek and what they deserve. The longstanding partnership between the United States and Egypt is based on shared interests and values, and we will continue to work with the Egyptian people to ensure that Egypt’s transition to democracy succeeds."

The White House Flickr feed released this photo of Obama discussing Egypt with members of his national security team in the White House Situation Room.

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July 1st, 2013
11:39 PM ET

Egypt's military gives Morsy ultimatum

Just don't call it a coup.

Appearing to throw its weight behind an opposition that swarmed Cairo's Tahrir Square, the Egyptian military told the country's civilian government it has until Wednesday evening to "meet the demands of the people" or it will step in to restore order. In a statement carried nationwide on radio and television, the military called the 48-hour ultimatum "a final chance to shoulder the burden of a historic moment in our country."

But a military spokesman said late Monday that the culture of the armed forces - which dominated the country for decades - "doesn't allow it to adopt the policy of military coups." The statement was meant to push all factions toward quick solutions and a national consensus, and the armed forces aren't looking to be part of the political or ruling circles, the spokesman, Col. Ahmed Ali, said in written statement.

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Egyptian tomb defaced
The graffiti was etched across the torso of the figure in the sculpture.
May 27th, 2013
07:49 AM ET

Egyptian tomb defaced

Parents of a 15-year-old Chinese tourist have apologized after the teenager defaced a stone sculpture in an ancient Egyptian temple with graffiti.

The act drew ire in both Egypt and China generating a massive online backlash amongst China's unforgiving netizens.

The vandal carved 'Ding Jinhao was here' in Chinese in the 3,500 year old Luxor Temple.

This was photographed by an embarrassed Chinese traveler and shared on weibo, China's micro-blogging site on May 24.

"The saddest moment in Egypt. I'm so embarrassed that I want to hide myself. I said to the Egyptian tour guide,'I'm really sorry,'" that traveler wrote on the original weibo post.

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Mubarak wins petition but will stay detained
Ousted Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak is wheeled out of an ambulance following a hearing in Cairo on Saturday.
April 15th, 2013
08:26 AM ET

Mubarak wins petition but will stay detained

Former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak will remain behind bars, even though he won an appeal in which he asked to be released while awaiting a retrial, Egyptian state-run media said Monday.

An appeals court granted his appeal Monday, technically freeing him in the case involving the killing of nonviolent protesters during the 2011 uprising that brought him down. But that action was made moot when the court also ordered that he remain detained in connection with newer corruption charges that were added to the older allegations, state media said.

State media confirmed the court's orders Monday afternoon, after conflicting reports from state media and the country's Information Ministry about whether the orders were made.

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March 9th, 2013
10:39 AM ET

2 dead in Egypt protests after verdict upheld

Two people were killed and at least 15 injured Saturday in Cairo, officials said, as Egyptians in two rival cities took to the streets to vent their anger over court verdicts in a controversial case involving deadly riots at a soccer game last year.

Health Ministry spokesman Ahmed Osman said one protester had been killed in violence outside the Semiramis Intercontinental hotel in downtown Cairo. He later confirmed a second death.

Five others have been injured in the clashes by the hotel, he said. Another 10 are suffering smoke inhalation.

A fire gutted the three-story building housing the Egyptian Football Association in a wealthy Cairo neighborhood, as soccer fans looked on. Next door, an exclusive club for policemen was also ablaze.

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Mubarak's retrial starts next month
Former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak was jailed for life following his conviction in June 2012
March 3rd, 2013
04:18 AM ET

Mubarak's retrial starts next month

Former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, his two sons and his former interior minister will be retried April 13, Egypt's state-run news agency Mena said Sunday.

Mubarak is serving a life sentence for his role in the killings of peaceful protesters during the revolution that eventually deposed him.

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March 2nd, 2013
08:29 AM ET

Kerry arrives in Egypt

Secretary of State John Kerry arrived in Cairo at a critical stage as political divisions are preventing crucial economic reform.

In an intense 24-hours on the ground, Kerry has a packed schedule of meetings with Egypt's political and military leadership, business leaders and non-governmental organizations.

"It is very important to the new Egypt for there to be a firm economic foundation on which the new Egypt can operate. It will be important for the government to make an agreement with the [International Monetary Fund]," explains a senior State Department official who briefed reporters on Kerry's plane as he flew from Ankara, Turkey, to Cairo.

Egypt's ability to stabilize extends beyond its needs from the IMF, the official said. "It unlocks a lot of the other money that would come from the U.S., the EU, from the Arab states and also from private investment."

Necessary reforms include increasing tax revenue and reducing energy subsidies, U.S. officials say. But in order to carry out the kind of reforms required for getting IMF money, the official says, "there has to be a basic political agreement among all of the various players in Egypt."

The Obama administration has been stressing to President Mohamed Morsy the importance of political consensus. But not only does Morsy need to build consensus, administration officials say, the various political leadership in Egypt needs to participate, as well.

Kerry, the official says, will not call on the opposition to renounce their boycott of upcoming elections, but he will make clear "If they want to engage, if they want to ensure that their views are taken into account, the only way to do that is to participate."

 

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February 27th, 2013
04:05 AM ET

Egypt balloon inquiry could take 2 weeks

It could take a while to learn the cause of a hot air balloon explosion that killed 19 people in Egypt this week.

An official investigation into Tuesday's accident the world's deadliest hot air balloon accident in at least 20 years could take two weeks, the governor of Luxor province said Wednesday.

Preliminary investigations confirmed no foul play was involved when gas canisters aboard the balloon exploded, causing it to plummet about 1,000 feet (300 meters) to the ground, Gov. Ezzat Saad said.

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Fatal hot air balloon crash
February 26th, 2013
02:05 PM ET

19 killed in hot air balloon crash in Egypt

[Updated at 2:05 p.m. ET] The death toll has climbed to 19, officials say.

[Updated at 6:57 a.m. ET] The death toll in Tuesday's hot air balloon explosion in Egypt the world's deadliest hot air balloon accident in at least 20 years has risen to 18, according to the state-run MENA news agency.

Twenty-one people, many of them tourists, were in the balloon when it dropped about 300 meters (almost 1,000 feet) in the city of Luxor, the Egyptian interior ministry said.

[Posted at 1:57 a.m. ET] Fourteen tourists on a hot air balloon ride in southern Egypt were killed Tuesday when the balloon exploded and plummeted to the ground, authorities said.

It was the deadliest hot air balloon accident in the world in at least 20 years.

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February 21st, 2013
05:05 PM ET

Egypt Parliament elections to start in April

Egypt will hold parliamentary elections in several stages beginning April 27, said Pakinam el-Sharkawy, a member of President Mohammed Morsy's presidential team.

Pakinam el-Sharkawy made the announcement on state television. He did not specify how many stages of elections will be held.

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