U.S. military plane crashes in Kyrgyzstan
A KC-135 tanker flies over Chicago in 2004.
May 3rd, 2013
02:55 PM ET

U.S. military plane crashes in Kyrgyzstan

An American military refueling plane took off and crashed in Kyrgyzstan on Friday, Kyrgyz and U.S. officials said.

Three people were on board, said Bolot Sharshenaliev of the Kyrgyz Emergencies Ministry. A ministry spokeswoman had previously said there were five. The U.S. military didn't give the number of those on the plane and said "the status of the crew is unknown."

The plane was a U.S. Air Force KC-135 tanker aircraft, according to the U.S. 376th Air Expeditionary Wing Public Affairs Transit Center at Manas, near Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan. The crew and aircraft are assigned to the transit center.

FULL STORY
Post by:
Filed under: Kyrgyzstan • Military
April 26th, 2013
06:22 AM ET

Suspects' father delays trip to U.S.

The parents of the Boston Marathon bombing suspects have left their home in Dagestan for another part of Russia, the suspects' mother Zubeidat Tsarnaev told CNN Friday. She said the suspects' father, Anzor Tsarnaev, is delaying his trip to the United States indefinitely.

He was to fly to the United States as soon as Friday to cooperate in the investigation into the attacks. But his wife called an ambulance for him Thursday.

She told CNN's Nick Paton Walsh that her husband was delaying the trip for health reasons. She wouldn't elaborate.

Anzor Tsarnaev agreed to fly to the United States after FBI agents and Russian officials spoke with them for hours this week at the family's home.

FULL STORY
Post by: ,
Filed under: Boston • Chechnya • CIA • CNN on the ground • Crime • Kyrgyzstan • Massachusetts • National security • New York • Russia • Security • Security Brief • Terrorism • Times Square • U.S. • World • World Update
A fistful of fish for the Fourth
Kubat Otorbaev, a journalist from Kyrgyzstan, grabbed a catfish on his first try.
July 4th, 2011
11:14 PM ET

A fistful of fish for the Fourth

Editor's note: Douglas M. Jones of CNN International tagged along as a group of international journalists went "catfish noodling" in a Tennessee lake during the Fourth of July weekend. Here he describes how the outing went.

“Just stick your hand down in there further and see if he bites it," Marty told me.

With a determined look on my face I took a deep breath and sunk back under water, using my arm as fish bait.

Earlier that morning, before sunrise, a crew and I met a group of visiting international journalists at their hotel in Atlanta.  We giggled like kids at the idea of sticking our hands into the mouth of a fish and ripping it out from under the water. FULL POST

Post by:
Filed under: Animals • Fish • Kyrgyzstan • Tennessee
Latest updates: WikiLeaks' diplomatic cables release
November 29th, 2010
06:42 PM ET

Latest updates: WikiLeaks' diplomatic cables release

WikiLeaks, a whistle-blowing website known for leaking state secrets, released on Sunday its latest batch of controversial documents. It has posted the first of what it says will be more than 250,000 secret U.S. diplomatic cables.

LATEST

[Updated at 10:14 p.m.]

– Ecuador has asked WikiLeaks founder and editor-in-chief Julian Assange to come to Quito and discuss documents regarding Ecuador and other Latin American countries. Ecuador expelled two U.S. diplomats in February 2009, accusing them of meddling in its internal affairs - allegations the State Department denied. The foreign ministry in Quito suggested Assange, an Australian citizen, apply for residency there.

– WikiLeaks documents posted on the websites of the Guardian and the New York Times suggest China is losing patience with its long-time ally North Korea, with senior figures in Beijing describing the regime in the North as behaving like a "spoiled child." According to cables obtained by WikiLeaks and cited by the Guardian, South Korea's vice-foreign minister Chun Yung-woo said he had been told by two senior Chinese officials (whose names are redacted in the cables) that they believed Korea should be reunified under Seoul's control, and that this view was gaining ground with the leadership in Beijing.

– The world's military shopping list is being exposed through the WikiLeaks publications. State-of-the-art missiles and American military helicopters are a frequent topic of discussion in the released diplomatic cables, which also show a keen interest in what weaponry Iran has and how to defend against them.

РFrom 2005 to 2009, U.S. diplomats regularly reported that Brazil tried to distance itself from what it saw as an "overly aggressive" American war on terror, and was highly sensitive highly to public claims suggesting that terrorist organizations have a presence in the country, according to cables released by WikiLeaks. But Brazil's counter-terrorism policy seemed to shift in 2009, with a cable detailing the government's strategy to deter terrorists from "using Brazilian territory to facilitate attacks or raise funds."

– Former President George W. Bush told a forum at Facebook's headquarters Monday that the document leak is "very damaging," adding that it may significantly hurt Washington's image abroad. "It's going to be very hard to keep the trust of foreign leaders," the nation's 43rd president said. "If you have a conversation with a foreign leader and it ends up in a newspaper, you don't like it. I didn't like it."

Here's a look at the leak, an overview of how WikiLeaks works and a summary of what some of the documents say about a variety of topics.


THE LEAK

– Sunday's leak contained the first of what the site says will be 251,288 cables that it plans to release piecemeal in the coming weeks or months.

FULL POST

Post by:
Filed under: Afghanistan • Brazil • China • Egypt • Germany • Honduras • Iran • Iraq • Kyrgyzstan • Libya • North Korea • Oman • Russia • Saudi Arabia • South Korea • Turkey • United Kingdom • WikiLeaks • World • Yemen • Zimbabwe
June 18th, 2010
10:44 AM ET

Acting Kyrgyz president says death toll likely much higher

The acting president of Kyrgyzstan said when it comes to the recent ethnic clashes in her country, she would "multiply the official [death] figure by ten," according to the Russian news website Kommersant.

Roza Otunbayeva told Kommersant many deaths in the countryside were not part of the official total of yet, which the Kyrgyz news agency Kabar places at 191, according to the Kyrgyz Health Care Ministry.

In a separate interview in Osh, the iterim president called for reconciliation between the Kyrgyz and Uzbeks.

"By all means, we have to give hope that we shall restore the city, return all the refugees and create all conditions for that. I think the entire world will be helping us, because we two peoples have the goodwill to live in peace and friendship together," said Otunbayeva.

FULL POST

Post by:
Filed under: Kyrgyzstan
June 16th, 2010
10:02 AM ET

On the Radar: Obama and oil, Iran and a reactor

 

Crews cleaning oil in Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana, trampled bird eggs, the parish president says.

It's day 58 of the Gulf Coast oil disaster and the morning after President Obama promised Americans in his first Oval Office speech that 90 percent of the crude spilled by the Deepwater Horizon rig will be captured within weeks. Obama is expected Wednesday to order BP executives to pick up the costs for the devastation.

Reactions to Obama's speech were mixed. "All that sounds nice," Grand Isle, Louisiana, fisherman Dean Blanchard said. But it doesn't change the fact that he "can't go to the bank tomorrow and pay [his] bills."

There is more bad news for Louisiana's birds. Crews cleaning in Plaquemines Parish trampled the nests and eggs of birds, including the brown pelican, according to parish president Billy Nungesser.

CNN later Wednesday will take a closer look at BP's history, highlighting the hours after a 2005 BP refinery explosion in Texas that killed 15 people. At the time, an executive suggested a holiday weekend and the national furor over a big story in Florida would lighten media attention on the blast, documents show.

Iran nuclear plans - Two weeks after the United Nations sanctioned Iran for its nuclear work, Iranian media reported the country is starting design work on a new nuclear reactor, the head of the country's Atomic Energy Organization said. The design reportedly will be complete in two to three years, and the reactor should be operational within five.

Calm in KyrgyzstanРThe first U.N. aid plane carrying 800 lightweight tents has arrived in Uzbekistan to help the thousands of people who have fled ethnic clashes in neighboring Kyrgyzstan. About 100,000 people have escaped fighting in the region. Though relative calm continued in the city of Osh, sporadic gunfire could be heard.

June 14th, 2010
10:51 AM ET

Thousands flee ethnic violence in Kyrgyzstan

[Updated at 10:51 a.m.] Refugees who fled violence in Kyrgyzstan are desperate for food, a top European official said Monday.

"People are screaming, 'We need food, we need food,' to those who are passing by," EU Commissioner Kristalina Georgieva.

[Posted at 9:41 a.m.] Smoke rose over the streets of Osh and sporadic gunfire could be heard Monday as ethnic groups continued to battle in the strategically important Central Asian nation of Kyrgyzstan.

FULL POST

Post by:
Filed under: Kyrgyzstan • World
June 11th, 2010
12:34 PM ET

At least 37 dead, 500 injured in Kyrgyzstan clashes

At least 37 people were killed and more than 500 suffered various injuries as a result of the latest violence in the city of Osh in southern Kyrgyzstan, a health official told CNN on Friday.

FULL POST

Post by:
Filed under: Kyrgyzstan
April 27th, 2010
05:41 AM ET

Ousted Kyrgyz president charged with mass murder

The interim Kyrgyzstan government announced it has charged ousted leader Kurmanbek Bakiev.

Kyrgyzstan's interim government has brought charges of mass murder against ousted President Kurmanbek Bakiev in absentia, an interim government official told reporters Tuesday.

FULL POST

Post by:
Filed under: Kyrgyzstan • World
April 20th, 2010
11:21 AM ET

Kyrgyzstan to seek ousted president's extradition

The chief of staff of the Kyrgyzstan interim government says that the country's new authorities will demand the extradition of ousted President Kurmanbek Bakiev from Belarus once the investigation into the bloody massacre of April 7 is completed.

"As soon as our own investigation, along with the investigation of an international commission, is over, we expect that Bakiev will hand himself over," Edil Baisalov told CNN in a phone interview. "We expect that he will stick to his promise that he is prepared to accept the results of such probes and face punishment."

More than 80 people were killed and hundreds were wounded that day when Bakiev's government ordered troops to shoot at opposition demonstrators gathered outside his presidential office in the country's capital, Bishkek.

Post by:
Filed under: Kyrgyzstan • World
April 19th, 2010
12:50 PM ET

Ex-Kyrgyz president on the move

Four days after fleeing his country to neighboring Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan's deposed president Kurmanbek Bakiev is once again on the move, this time to an undisclosed location.

"He [Bakiev] left on Sunday. I can't say where he went," said Ilyas Omarov, a spokesman for Kazakhstan's foreign ministry.

Bakiyev was overthrown earlier this month after a day of bloody clashes between police and protesters in the Kyrgyz capital Bishkek left scores of people dead.

FULL POST

Post by:
Filed under: Kyrgyzstan • World
April 15th, 2010
01:57 PM ET

Ousted Kyrgyz president leaves country

Ousted Kyrgyz President Kurmanbek Bakiev left the country and resigned Thursday after negotiations among the government, the president, and international states and agencies.

FULL POST

Post by:
Filed under: Kyrgyzstan • World
April 14th, 2010
11:13 AM ET

U.S. envoy praises interim Kyrgyz government

The people running Kyrgyzstan after the president fled the capital last week are making "encouraging" progress on human rights, a top United States envoy said here Wednesday.

FULL POST

Post by:
Filed under: Kyrgyzstan • World
April 13th, 2010
10:19 AM ET

Sources: Kyrgyz president willing to step down

The ousted Kyrgyz president is willing to resign if he and his relatives are allowed safe passage out of the country, according to sources in southern Kyrgyzstan.

FULL POST

Post by:
Filed under: Kyrgyzstan • World
April 9th, 2010
10:43 AM ET

Kyrgyz president accused of emptying bank accounts

The chief of staff of the interim Kyrgyz government, which took over after President Kurmanbek Bakiev fled the capital, accused the president Friday of stealing the country's money when he left.

FULL POST

Post by:
Filed under: Kyrgyzstan • World
April 9th, 2010
09:22 AM ET

On the Radar: Mine search, Sarah Palin, Yemen child death

A handmade sign in support of missing miners hangs on a fence in Dorothy, West Virginia.

West Virginia mine disaster Rescue crews searching for four missing miners were evacuated Friday from a West Virginia coal mine after encountering smoke, a signal of an active fire somewhere in the mine. Before retreating, the rescuers found one of two airtight safety chambers where  miners might have taken shelter but it had not been deployed. CNN is looking at safety issues and what is being done to keep miners out of harm's way as well as the resiliency of coal mining towns and how they respond to these tragedies.

Palin and the mainstream GOP While revered by the Tea Party and hard-core conservatives, former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin isn’t held in such high esteem by the GOP mainstream 43 percent of all Republicans have a favorable view of her, according to a CBS News poll this week. As she prepares to address 4,000 Republicans of all stripes at the Southern Republican Leadership Conference in New Orleans, Louisiana, we look at where she stands and the decision she’ll have to make soon: pursue the GOP presidential nomination in 2012 or embrace a potentially lucrative media career. CNN's Paul Steinhauser reports.

FULL POST

Post by:
Filed under: Israel • Kyrgyzstan • On the Radar • Sarah Palin • Showbiz • U.S. • West Virginia • World • Yemen
April 8th, 2010
12:44 PM ET

Kyrgyz leader acknowledges coup, but won't abandon job

[Updated at 12:44 p.m.] The United States has closed its embassy in Kyrgyzstan, a senior State Department official said Thursday.

The United States is contemplating moving dependents to Manas Air Base for a few days because of concern about the political violence that has engulfed the central Asian country, the official said.

The U.S. military uses Manas as a supply link for troops in Afghanistan. U.S. closes embassy in Kyrgyzstan

[Updated at 11:02 a.m.] President Kurmanbek Bakiev said it's clear there has been a coup, but emphasized, "I am not abandoning my duties."

"I am prepared to bear responsibility for the tragic events that have happened if it will be proven by an objective and unbiased recognition without hiding behind the presidential immunity. I believe I acted in the way that the constitution required," Bakiev said in his statement, posted on 24.kg, a well-known Kyrgyz Web site. FULL POST

Post by:
Filed under: Kyrgyzstan
April 8th, 2010
12:21 PM ET

U.S. military at Kyrgyz base helping hospitals after unrest

A U.S. Air Force sergeant at the Manas Air base turns over supplies to local hospitals.

U.S. military personnel at Manas Air Base in Kyrgyzstan were helping local hospitals cope with victims of the violent political unrest in the central Asian country.

FULL POST

Post by:
Filed under: Kyrgyzstan • World