June 7th, 2011
09:06 AM ET

Ford's CEO explains ambitious expansion plan

The Ford Motor Company was the only one of the big three auto makers that didn't take a government bailout in 2009. That decision proved wise, because they were able to bounce back on its own. The company's stock, which might be in your IRA or 401k, is up by about 780% since then.

Much of that success can be attributed to the fact that in 2006 the Ford founding family brought in a man named Alan Mulally, from Boeing, to run the company. Mulally, an engineer by training, took drastic steps. Ford has now been profitable for two years, and today it's unveiling a plan to increase sales by 50% in less than four years, mainly by growing in Asia and by selling more small cars than SUVs.

On American Morning this morning, Alan Mulally, CEO of Ford Motor Company, discussed the company's incredible turnaround and his bold plan for expansion.

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Filed under: Business • Economy
February 21st, 2011
08:37 AM ET

Teachers in upstate N.Y. talk, take pay freeze

Call it the "tale of two states." Protests in Wisconsin against Gov. Scott Walker's proposed budget cuts continue today, but teachers in another U.S. school district are taking a different approach.

Educators in one New York school district are being applauded by New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo for agreeing to a one-year salary freeze - even though they were due a pay raise - to make up for state budget shortfalls during tough economic times. With the pay freeze, the district can keep class sizes small and half as many teachers will lose their jobs.

Monday on "American Morning," T.J. Holmes spoke with John Christian, math teacher and president of the West Genesee Teachers Association, and Chris Brown, the West Genesee School District superintendent. He asked why their school district was able to come to a compromise where others haven't.

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Filed under: Education
February 21st, 2011
08:35 AM ET

Rookie says he 'set the bar high' with Daytona win

On Sunday, NASCAR had its version of the Super Bowl: the Daytona 500. And this year, a 20-year-old became the first rookie and the youngest driver to win it.

Trevor Bayne, who turned 20 the day before the race, won the event and joined "American Morning's" Kiran Chetry and T.J. Holmes to explain how it felt to win big.

"You set the bar high when you win your first ever Daytona 500. There is still a lot of history to be written," he said.

"It is cool to be the winner," he added. "It is because of everybody around me ... we got to work with Jeff Gordon in that race. That was incredible."

Watch the entire interview here:

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Filed under: Auto racing • Sports
Raw 'Skins': The drama and legal issues of MTV's new show
The cast of MTV's new show "Skins." The show has sparked controversy whether the "edgy" has gone too far.
January 21st, 2011
09:30 AM ET

Raw 'Skins': The drama and legal issues of MTV's new show

Brian Stetler, has reported on the controversy surrounding MTV's new drama 'Skins' and is a writer for the New York Times.

The series, based on the popular U.K. show of the same name, has been billed as "edgy" in how it tells the by now familiar story of foul-mouthed high school teens who spend a lot of time seeking sex and drugs.

Stetler speaks to CNN's Kiran Chetry about the investigations into child pornography the Justice Department and Congress are calling for.

Marquee blog: What's the verdict on 'Skins'?

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Filed under: Showbiz • TV • TV-American Morning
Terrell Owens tackles a totally different big issue - Alzheimer's
Terrell Owens' grandmother, Alice, was diagnosed with Alzheimer's in 1996.
January 20th, 2011
03:02 PM ET

Terrell Owens tackles a totally different big issue - Alzheimer's

He might be remembered as being one of the best wide receivers of the 2000's or as the star of Vh1's "The TO Show" but what NFL wide receiver Terrell Owens wants to be remembered as, is an advocate for Alzheimer's awareness.

Owens's grandmother, Alice, was diagnosed with Alzheimer's in 1996 and since then Owens has been a vocal supporter of awareness.

One in eight people aged 65 and older (13%) have Alzheimer's and that number is expected to rise in the future. Terrell Owens talks about his cause with T.J. Holmes and Kiran Chetry.

Tiger mom mauled: Author talks to TIME about controversial column
A column written by Amy Chua on "Why Chinese Mothers are Superior" has sparked widespread controversy.
January 20th, 2011
12:58 PM ET

Tiger mom mauled: Author talks to TIME about controversial column

Author and professor Amy Chua garnered a lot of attention following the release of her book "Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother" and her Wall Street Journal column "Why Chinese Mothers are Superior."

The piece in particular struck a chord with the American public - it has been read over a million times - as Chua seemed to take a jab at American parenting.

As she told Kiran Chetry last week on American Morning, Chua claims traditional Chinese parenting, which stresses discipline, hard work and perseverance, leads to successful and competitive children.

TIME magazine's latest issue out today puts the effectiveness of Chua's strict parenting methods to the test. However, though the merit of such methods is still up for debate as many take issue with Chua's somewhat harsh approach.

Kiran Chetry sits down with Annie Murphy Paul, contributor for TIME Magazine and author of "Origins," to discuss TIME's take on topic of parenting.

Author speaks on China: Are they more friend or foe?
President Barack Obama shakes hands with with Chinese President Hu Jintao Wednesday.
January 19th, 2011
11:35 AM ET

Author speaks on China: Are they more friend or foe?

Chinese President Hu Jintao is in Washington for a three-day visit what is crucial in diplomatic relations.

On CNN's American Morning, author and columnist, Gordon Chang discusses the importance of this meeting.

To the statement, "We need China more than China needs us," he gave an unequivocal answer: No.

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Filed under: China • TV-American Morning • U.S.
Ron Paul: Health care repeal 'represents what people are saying'
Representative Ron Paul said that he knows the gesture is largely symbolic since the Senate wouldn't pass the repeal.
January 19th, 2011
09:40 AM ET

Ron Paul: Health care repeal 'represents what people are saying'

As the House of Representatives prepare to vote on health care reform repeal today, President Obama has released a statement signaling that he is willing to make improvements on the bill but is not in favor of a full repeal:

"So I’m willing and eager to work with both Democrats and Republicans to improve the Affordable Care Act," Obama said. "But we can’t go backward."

But congressmen on Capitol Hill like Representative Ron Paul (R-Texas) believe that repeal is the only option. He told CNN American Morning's Kiran Chetry that the bill going to vote today "tells us what we should do in the future."

Paul is also unhappy with the way we are treating our relationship with China. He says that more government intervention in China is not the answer and "we can't blame China for us spending too much money."

Watch his complete interview:

SI.com reporters: Will documents mean last ride for Lance Armstrong?
Cyclist Lance Armstrong is interviewing during his preparations for the Tour Down Under event.
January 19th, 2011
09:29 AM ET

SI.com reporters: Will documents mean last ride for Lance Armstrong?

Sports Illustrated magazine reporters Selena Roberts and David Epstein reviewed hundreds of documents and interviewed dozens of people who have been involved with the doping allegation charges against seven-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong and raise new questions in their feature article for this week's magazine.

Epstein talks to American Morning's T.J. Holmes about what was uncovered in the magazine's investigation and what it means for Armstrong's future.

What does future hold for Apple without Steve Jobs?
Apple's Steve Jobs talks about the iPad after it was released.
January 18th, 2011
12:44 PM ET

What does future hold for Apple without Steve Jobs?

He's not telling us exactly why or for how long, but Steve Jobs announced Monday he will be taking a leave of absence from his duties as Apple's Chief Executive to focus on his health.

What Jobs has told us, though, is who will replace him during his leave. Chief Operating Officer Tim Cook will be the man to fill in for the tech legend.

Many are worried about Apple's future without Jobs at the helm but Cook has been in this position before; Cook filled in for Jobs during two prior leaves of absence. Those past absences came with Jobs' battle with pancreatic cancer and a liver transplant and many presume Jobs' current absence is related to his prior health problems.

T.J. Holmes talks to Leander Kahney, Editor and Publisher of CultofMac.com and Author of "Inside Steve's Brain", about what the future holds for Apple in light of Monday's announcement.

Holyfield: I want to be heavyweight champion again
Boxer Evander Holyfield poses after a weigh-in in 2009.
January 18th, 2011
09:20 AM ET

Holyfield: I want to be heavyweight champion again

"I have a goal. My goal ever since 1992 to be the heavyweight champion of the world again."

At age 48, Evander Holyfield said he isn't letting age stop him in his quest to become a heavyweight champion once again.

Over his 26 year career he has fought in countless fights, won 5 heavyweight titles, and even participated in a memorable stint on ABC's "Dancing with the Stars." He gets back in the ring this Saturday night against Sherman "Tank" Williams at the Greenbrier in White Sulpher Springs, West Virginia.

On American Morning Holyfield told Kiran Chetry how he stayed in shape for his upcoming fight.

"The only reason you don't reach goals is because you quit," he said.

Is repealing health care about health, or presidential election?
Rep. Steve King discussed how part of the goal of the bill is to elect a new president in 2012.
January 18th, 2011
08:51 AM ET

Is repealing health care about health, or presidential election?

The House of Representatives begins debate this morning on H.R. 2 or as its named, "Repealing the Job-Killing Health Care Law Act." co-sponsored by Representative Steve King, a republican from Iowa and Representative Michele Bachmann, a republican from Minnesota.

The bill's goal is to repeal President Obama's health care reform legislation of last year. But with President Obama still in office and sure to veto any legislation the bill seems largely a symbolic effort.

Even among the public, a new CNN/Opinion Research Corporation poll out this morning shows that Obama's approval rating is up five points since last month and support for repealing isn't overwhelming.

Before the debate begins, Rep. Steve King joins T.J. Holmes on American Morning defending the bill and saying the effort is all in hopes of electing a new president in 2012.

What an independent Southern Sudan could mean for rest of Africa
A woman votes for the referendum on whether Southern Sudan should become an independent nation.
January 14th, 2011
09:26 AM ET

What an independent Southern Sudan could mean for rest of Africa

It is the most important global story in the world right now and chances are... you aren't paying attention to it.

Africa's largest nation, Sudan, has been war-torn for almost the entirety of its post colonial history. Factions in the northern and southern regions of the country have been clashing for years and the south may soon be on the verge of taking an historic step towards independence.

New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof, former President Jimmy Carter and one-time sexiest man alive, George Clooney, are helping the effort to get the historic decision to a peaceful vote and resolution.

Kristof joins American Morning today to explain the situation in Sudan and clarify why a secession of the South would be an optimistic future for the region.

Pope John Paul II: Is he on the fast-track to sainthood?
There is some debate as to whether Pope John Paul II's path to possible sainthood has been quicker than others.
January 14th, 2011
08:21 AM ET

Pope John Paul II: Is he on the fast-track to sainthood?

The late Pope John Paul II is one miracle away from sainthood.

CNN's Senior Vatican Correspondent John Allen reports that a beatification ceremony for the late Pope will take place on May 1. This morning, Pope Benedict XVI credited his predecessor with performing a miracle which is the final requirement for beatification. Sainthood, however, would require that he be credited with performing two miracles.

But today's move does not come without controversy. As Allen explains to Kiran Chetry, some Catholics have expressed disapproval that the late Pope seems to be on the fast-track to sainthood.

N.J Governor: 'No magic wand' for economic, school problems
New Jersey Governor Chris Christie spoke with CNN about education, the economy and "The Jersey Shore."
January 12th, 2011
09:57 AM ET

N.J Governor: 'No magic wand' for economic, school problems

Rising star in the Republican Party N.J Governor Chris Christie has made tough choices during his tenure in office by closing the state spending gap and getting tough with teachers unions. He says there no easy choices to make in hard economic times and there is "no magic wand to wave."

Wednesday, Christie spoke to American Morning's T.J. Holmes about politicians telling the truth, making tough decisions in education and whether or not he is winning the battle against MTV's "Jersey Shore."

Clerk: Judge John Roll 'greatly dedicated to his family,' 'family of his staff'
A photo of U.S. District Judge John Roll sits at a makeshift memorial.
January 10th, 2011
09:51 AM ET

Clerk: Judge John Roll 'greatly dedicated to his family,' 'family of his staff'

U.S. District Judge John Roll, one of the victims in the Arizona shooting, will leave behind a  legacy as a man who put excellent attention into every component of his life, his former clerk spoke told CNN's T.J. Holmes.
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Filed under: Arizona • Courts • Crime • Gabrielle Giffords • Judge • TV-American Morning
Pair describes taking down suspect in Arizona shooting
An FBI agent investigates the crime scene at the Safeway in Tuscon, Arizona.
January 10th, 2011
09:17 AM ET

Pair describes taking down suspect in Arizona shooting

Dr. Steven Rayle, helped hold the Arizona gunman down and Patricia Maisch, grabbed the magazine cartridge.

The two were among others who risked their lives in the face of danger after suspect Jared Lee Loughner allegedly opened fire in a Safeway in Tuscon, Arizona. They spoke to CNN's Kiran Chetry about their harrowing experience.

"You just react," Maisch said about approaching the gunman. "You just do it."

Chief of neurosurgery: Rep. Giffords is 'holding her own'
A photo of U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords sits in a makeshift memorial outside the University Medical Center at the University of Arizona.
January 10th, 2011
09:03 AM ET

Chief of neurosurgery: Rep. Giffords is 'holding her own'

The University Medical Center in Tucson is expected to give an updated diagnosis on Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords condition later Monday morning. Giffords was shot in the head after an attack on Saturday.

On American Morning Kiran Chetry spoke to the chief of neurosurgery at the hospital, Dr. Michael Lemole, for a quick update.

Dr. Lemole remains optimistic saying that "no change is good" when it comes to Giffords current state.

Suspect Jared Lee Loughner's former teacher: 'I was scared of what he could do'
The Arizona shooting suspect's former teacher Ben McGahee spoke to CNN about previous concerns about Jared Lee Lougner's behavior.
January 10th, 2011
08:46 AM ET

Suspect Jared Lee Loughner's former teacher: 'I was scared of what he could do'

Ben McGahee, Jared Lee Loughner's former teacher at Pima Community College spoke to CNN's Kiran Chetry about how he believed Loughner was a troubled man.

McGahee recalled how Loughner's classmates described strange behavior that made them uncomfortable.

McGahee notified campus administration and the dean about his concerns and ultimately removed Loughner from his class permanently.

Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz: We have to remember 'words matter'
Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz hopes we don't become intimidated by this shooting, we also realize words matter.
January 10th, 2011
08:35 AM ET

Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz: We have to remember 'words matter'

While the motivation for Saturday's attack in Tucson, Arizona are still unclear, a concern in Washington and in the nation at large is whether or not the current political rhetoric has gotten out of control.

Democratic Representative Debbie Wasserman Schultz from Florida, and Republican Representative Ted Poe from Texas, are colleagues and friends of Gabrielle Giffords in Congress.

Rep. Wasserman Schultz warns that while "we cannot allow incidences like this intimidate."

"Words matter," she said.

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