June 3rd, 2013
02:11 PM ET

Floodwaters, deaths surge after storms

Oklahoma had barely started clearing the rubble from a monstrous tornado two weeks ago when another rash of twisters plowed through this ill-fated swath of Tornado Alley.

At least 14 people died and six are missing after tornadoes raked the state late Friday, the Oklahoma Office of the Chief Medical Examiner said Monday.

Among the dead were seven Guatemalan citizens, according to the country's Consulate General in Houston. Four Guatemalan citizens were missing, the consulate said. It was not immediately clear if the dead and missing were part of earlier tallies provided by Oklahoma officials.

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Filed under: Flooding • Missouri • Oklahoma • Tornadoes • Weather
Arias could face death penalty, jury decides
Arias sobbed in the courtroom as prosecutors presented evidence.
May 15th, 2013
09:48 PM ET

Arias could face death penalty, jury decides

Jodi Arias could face the death penalty, nearly five years after she stabbed, shot and almost decapitated her ex-boyfriend.

A jury Wednesday found that Arias was "exceptionally cruel" when she murdered Travis Alexander in 2008. That verdict is a key step that makes Arias, 32, eligible for the death penalty in the next phase of her trial.

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Filed under: Arizona • Justice
April 10th, 2013
06:42 AM ET

Police: Texas college attack was planned

Dylan Quick overcame a childhood disability and had big plans for the future.

But on Tuesday, the 20-year-old student went on a stabbing spree on his Texas college campus, authorities said.

By the time campus police took him into custody, 14 people had been injured at Lone Star College. It's unclear how many of the injured were stabbed and how many suffered other injuries.

The campus shut down Tuesday, but will reopen Wednesday.

Spanish newspaper prints, retracts fake photo of ailing Hugo Chavez
Venezuelan Minister of Comunication Ernesto Villegas speaks at the news conference in Caracas on Thursday.
January 24th, 2013
08:09 PM ET

Spanish newspaper prints, retracts fake photo of ailing Hugo Chavez

Early editions of Spain's leading newspaper Thursday displayed a large front-page photo claiming to be an "unprecedented" and "exclusive" look at Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez's medical treatment in Cuba.

But the intubated man lying in a hospital bed shown in the photo wasn't Chavez, the newspaper soon discovered, and began backtracking.

El Pais took down the photo, which was on the newspaper's website for about 30 minutes, and also recalled the early editions of its newspaper from newsstands.

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Filed under: Cuba • Hugo Chavez • Spain • Venezuela
At least 48 dead after 7.4-magnitude quake off Mexico-Guatemala border
November 7th, 2012
09:28 PM ET

At least 48 dead after 7.4-magnitude quake off Mexico-Guatemala border

Editor's note: A 7.4-magnitude earthquake hit Wednesday off the coast of Guatemala, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. Guatemalan officials say at least 48 people died and about 125,000 people were without power. The quake, centered about 15 miles from the coastal city of Champerico at a depth of 26 miles, was felt throughout Central America and as far north as Mexico City. Below are updates:

[Updated at 9:27 p.m. ET] At least 48 people were killed as a result of the earthquake, Guatemalan President Otto Perez Molina said.

[Updated at 5:07 p.m. ET] The death toll in the Guatemalan quake has risen to at least 29, said David de Leon, a spokesman for the country's disaster relief agency.

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Superstorm Sandy's toll: Mounting deaths, historic destruction, stranded residents
Taxis sit in a flooded lot in Hoboken, New Jersey, on Tuesday.
October 30th, 2012
11:02 PM ET

Superstorm Sandy's toll: Mounting deaths, historic destruction, stranded residents

Editor's Note: Superstorm Sandy smashed ashore last night, triggering floods, fires and devastation. At least 33 people are known to have died in the United States and one in Canada, adding to the storm’s earlier toll of 67. Millions are without power. Floods have hit homes and the New York subway system. Here is the full story and below is the latest news as we learn it.

Are you there? Send your stories and photos to CNN iReport but stay safe.

[Update 11:02 p.m.]  Superstorm Sandy continues to weaken over Pennsylvania. It is some 50 miles east-northeast of Pittsburgh, according to an 11 p.m. advisory from the National Hurricane Center. The storm is expected to move northward into Canada on Wednesday.

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September 17th, 2012
12:14 PM ET

Officials: Tainted sugar sold in Dominican grocery stores

(CNN) - Dominican authorities have warned consumers not to eat a brand of sugar imported from Brazil after tests found that it was tainted.

The sugar came from a 14,000-metric-ton shipment that has been on the market since July and is "not suitable for domestic consumption," the Dominican Republic's consumer protection agency said.

The Canaria brand sugar was imported from Brazil by the Casa Chepe company, the agency said in a statement posted on its Facebook page Sunday. Representatives from the company could not be immediately reached for comment.

The Dominican Republic's health ministry has ordered a recall of the refined white sugar, and the local company agreed to pull it from shelves, the consumer agency said.

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Pat Summitt steps down as Tennessee women's basketball coach
Summitt, seen here in 2011, announced she had early onset Alzheimer's disease last year.
April 18th, 2012
02:08 PM ET

Pat Summitt steps down as Tennessee women's basketball coach

[Updated at 4:40 p.m. ET] Eight months after revealing her diagnosis with early-onset Alzheimer's, the head coach of the University of Tennessee's women's basketball team announced she was stepping down Wednesday.

Summitt, who led the Lady Vols to eight national championships and whose 1,098 wins are the most in major-college basketball history, will now serve as "head coach emeritus," helping with on-campus recruiting, mentoring players and serving as a liaison between the coaching staff and the athletics director, Tennessee said.

"I've loved being the head coach at Tennessee for 38 years, but I recognize that the time has come to move into the future and to step into a new role," Summitt, 60, said in a statement released by Tennessee.

Holly Warlick, an assistant on the Tennessee staff for 27 seasons and a former Lady Vols player, has been named Summitt's successor.

"I support Holly Warlick being named the next head coach, and I want to help ensure the stability of the program going forward," Summitt said. "I would like to emphasize that I fully intend to continue working as head coach emeritus, mentoring and teaching life skills to our players, and I will continue my active role as a spokesperson in the fight against Alzheimer's through the Pat Summitt Foundation Fund."

Tennessee has scheduled a news conference for Thursday afternoon.

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March 21st, 2012
10:06 AM ET

Officials survey damage after strong quake jolts Mexico

ACAPULCO, Mexico (CNN) - Mexican officials were assessing damage Wednesday, a day after a strong earthquake left homes in ruins and rattled residents hundreds of miles away from the epicenter.

At least 11 people were injured and hundreds of houses were damaged in the 7.4-magnitude quake, which struck mid-day Tuesday in southern Mexico.

Photos from some of the hardest-hit areas showed residents surveying rubble where adobe homes once stood. Broken tiles and pieces of buildings fell onto sidewalks as far away as Mexico City, about 200 miles (320 km) from the quake's epicenter.

The city's mayor said the earthquake was one of the strongest to impact the capital since an 8.0 temblor that struck in 1985, killing about 10,000 people in the sprawling metropolis. But officials said no deaths had been reported after Tuesday's quake, despite the widespread alarm it caused.

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February 22nd, 2012
07:18 PM ET

50 killed, hundreds injured in Argentina train crash

Editor's note: Lea este artículo en español/Read this article in Spanish

[Updated at 11:35 p.m. ET] A train packed with rush-hour commuters plowed head-on into a barrier at a Buenos Aires station Wednesday morning, killing 50 people and injuring hundreds more, officials in Argentina said.

The train failed to stop as it should have, and slammed into the barrier at Once station at Plaza Miserere shortly after 8:30 a.m. local time, rail service owner Buenos Aires Trains said.

Video of the crash aired by Argentina TV station C5N shows people waiting on a platform as the train's front section passes them and the camera. The train then comes to a violent halt, apparently because the front section hit the barrier farther down the track.

The crash caused the train's second section to be pushed 6 meters into the first section, Transportation Secretary Juan Pablo Schiavi said, according to the Buenos Aires Herald. (See animated simulation of wreck from C5N)

Did you see the crash? Share your photos and videos with CNN and tell us what you're seeing.

Other video from the scene showed rescuers prying open windows of the twisted train to reach trapped passengers. Crews carried bleeding victims on stretchers through the busy station; some victims were taken to area hospitals by helicopter.

Argentina's president declared a two-day period of mourning.

"The government and people of Argentina give their solidarity and weigh the pain felt by the families of the victims," President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner said in a statement declaring the mourning period. Memorials will be held outside Argentina's Government House and Olivos, the presidential residence, the state news agency Telam reported.

"Never in my life had I seen anything like this," Schiavi told reporters hours after the accident.

Shaken passengers told reporters the crash sounded like a bomb blast.

"Suddenly I heard a bang, and many people fell on top of me. I think I had more than 10 people above me. I got out as quickly as I could," a passenger named Esteban told state news agency Telam. "I only saw injured people and heard screams."

Another passenger, identified only as Fabian, said he "flew 15 (meters) forward due to the impact," the Buenos Aires Herald reported.

"I had people piled on top of me. None of us could move,” Fabian said, according to the Herald.

Another passenger told C5N that shortly before impact, when passengers noticed the train wasn't stopping, some started to shout to others that they should run to the back.

The first two cars of the train crammed with commuters were most affected by the crash.

Passengers emerged bruised, some with serious injuries, Schiavi said. More than 460 were hospitalized.

The crash injured more than 600 people, the state-run Telam news agency reported.

Family members flooded local hospitals, clamoring for information about missing loved ones.

Officials were investigating the crash, which was one of the nation's worst in decades.

They will use GPS data, security camera footage, audio recordings from the driver's cabin and maintenance records in their investigation, Schiavi said.

The train stopped at other stations on its route, and data shows that it slowed down as it approached the Once station, Schiavi said.

"It stopped 14 times, and the last time, it didn't stop," he said.

The packed train was traveling at 26 kilometers per hour (16 mph) when it entered the station, he said.

"We do not know what happened in the last 40 meters," he said.

The train's 28-year-old driver had just started his shift and had a good record, the transportation minister said.

Earlier Wednesday, Schiavi said authorities believed there were problems with the train's brakes that caused it to smash into a barrier at the station.

Buenos Aires Trains, which runs the rail service, said it was cooperating with the federal investigation.

"The company sends its condolences to the family members of the deceased passengers and remains very concerned about the health of all the injured people," the firm said in a statement.

Wednesday's crash was among the worst in Argentina's history, Telam reported.

In 1970, 200 people died when two trains crashed north of Buenos Aires.

Eight years later, 56 people were killed when a train hit a truck in Argentina's Santa Fe province, the state news agency reported.

Last September, a crash involving two passenger trains and a bus in Buenos Aires killed at least 11 people.

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Former Maldives president beaten, his party says
Mohamed Nasheed became the country's first democratically elected president in 30 years in 2008.
February 8th, 2012
11:44 AM ET

Former Maldives president beaten, his party says

Police attacked the former Maldives president Wednesday, beating him up a day after he stepped down, the Maldivian Democratic Party said.

"We strongly condemned the violent attack by the Maldivian Police Service on President (Mohamed) Nasheed and senior officials of the MDP," the party said in a written statement. "President Nasheed is being beaten up as of now in an ongoing peaceful protest."

Four members of Parliament were abducted as violence gripped the nation's capital, Male, lawmaker Eva Abdulla said, and the head of the party was hospitalized in critical condition.

Police sprayed tear gas and beat demonstrators with batons, she said, and the brutal violence left some protesters bleeding in the streets.

FULL STORY
January 8th, 2012
12:11 AM ET

Iran's president looks to Latin America as global sanctions grow

Beef from Brazil is on Iranian dinner tables. An Iranian-built hospital treats patients near Bolivia's capital. Iranian-funded factories dot the Venezuelan countryside.

Iran has forged hundreds of agreements with Latin American nations and pledged billions of dollars to fund them.

More deals could be in store this week as Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad embarks on a trip that starts in Venezuela on Sunday and includes stops in Nicaragua, Ecuador and Cuba.

Well before the Iranian leader's arrival in Caracas, his plans for a Latin America tour grabbed global attention as tensions grow between many Western powers and Iran over the nation's nuclear program.

"As the regime feels increasing pressure, it is desperate for friends and flailing around in interesting places to find new friends," U.S. State Department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland told reporters Friday.

But analysts say Ahmadinejad's visit is the latest step in a longstanding, calculated effort to shore up support in the region.

As Iran strives to improve its image, get around stiffening sanctions, dampen America's global influence and secure a stronger foothold in the United States' backyard, relationships with Latin American countries have become increasingly important.

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October 25th, 2011
12:00 PM ET

Killings by Dominican police 'alarming,' says Amnesty

Police in the Dominican Republic were responsible for an "alarming" 10.5% percent of the nation's killings last year, Amnesty International said Tuesday, citing government statistics.

A report from the human rights organization sharply criticizes the Caribbean nation's police, saying they have been behind "scores of cases of killings, torture and ill-treatment."

"Police killings should not become the way to solve the problem of repeat offenders and warn young people against crime," Javier Zuniga, the head of Amnesty's delegation to the Dominican Republic, said in a statement.

Speaking to CNN before Amnesty released its report, National Police spokesman Col. Maximo Aybar said police in the Dominican Republic were committed to protecting the public.

"We are more than aware that we are here to defend members of society, not to assault them. And that is an institutional position. In those cases where excesses may have been committed, investigations have occurred and measures have been taken: members were suspended from their posts and placed at the disposition of the courts," he said.

Police were responsible for at least 260 of the nation's 2,472 homicides in 2010, Amnesty International said, citing statistics from the National Police and the Prosecutor General. That figure marked a decrease from previous years. In 2008, for example, police were responsible for 19% of the killings in the nation. Details about the circumstances of those killings were unclear.

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November 27th, 2010
10:31 AM ET

Lightning strike kills 7 at nursery school party in South Africa

A lightning strike killed seven people - including a 4-year-old child - at a nursery school Christmas party in South Africa, a government spokeswoman said Saturday.

Forty others were injured when the lightning struck in KwaZulu-Natal Friday afternoon, said Mashu Cele, a spokeswoman for the province's social development department.

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Filed under: Nature • South Africa
November 22nd, 2010
11:15 AM ET

Pat down backlash grows during holiday travel rush

As backlash against airline passenger pat-downs intensified with a viral online video, the nation's top airline security official said Monday that his agency is walking a fine line between privacy concerns and public safety.

A short video clip circulating on the internet shows a shirtless boy receiving a pat-down from a Transportation Security Administration agent. His father watches, hands on his hips, obstructing part of the view. But the words playing in the background are clear.

"Are they harassing a kid?" one man asks.

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Filed under: Air travel
October 25th, 2010
07:15 AM ET

Florida "Hiccup Girl" charged with murder

Police: Jennifer Mee, AKA "Hiccup Girl," is charged with first-degree murder

A Florida teenager who gained national notoriety for a case of the hiccups that lasted for weeks in 2007 has been arrested and charged with first-degree murder, authorities said.

Jennifer Mee, 19, was arrested and charged Sunday, according to jail booking information on the Pinellas County Sheriff's Office website. In 2007, Mee's non-stop hiccups gained national attention. She earned the nickname "Hiccup Girl" and appeared multiple times on NBC's "Today" show.

Mee and two others - Laron Raiford, 20, and Lamont Newton, 22 - were arrested and accused of fatally shooting a man during an armed robbery attempt in St. Petersburg, Florida, Saturday night. FULL STORY

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July 16th, 2010
05:29 AM ET

3.6-magnitude quake rattles D.C. area

A 3.6-magnitude earthquake struck near the Gaithersburg, Maryland, area just after 5 a.m. ET Friday, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

The center of the quake was about 20 miles northwest of Washington, the USGS said.

"It was really loud, like a plane flying really low. I had never felt anything like it," said Anne Ngunjiri, 30, of Gaithersburg. "I was jolted out of bed. All my neighbors woke up. After it passed, I thought it could be an earthquake, and lay in bed hoping there were no aftershocks."

Judy Rudolph, 64, said she was writing e-mails in bed in Rockville, Maryland, when her house started to shake. "My first reaction was the noise.... I thought it was an explosion," she said. She said she'd never felt anything like it in her 31 years living there.

The last earthquake in Maryland occurred on October 8, 2007, according to the USGS website. It was a 1.7-magnitude quake about 5 miles northwest of Baltimore.

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Filed under: U.S. • Weather
May 8th, 2010
12:28 AM ET

4 reporters banned from Gitmo court proceedings

The Pentagon has banned four reporters from covering court proceedings on the U.S. naval station at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, because they published the name of a former U.S. Army interrogator.

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