85 hurt in New York ferry crash
January 9th, 2013
06:32 PM ET

85 hurt in New York ferry crash

  • 85 people hurt in Wednesday morning ferry crash at lower Manhattan pier, two critically, authorities say
  • Ferry was carrying passengers from New Jersey to New York City's Pier 11 near Wall Street
  • Below are the latest updates as they come to us. You also can read our full story.

[Update 6:32 p.m. ET] Eighty-five people were injured in the crash, including people who were treated and released at the scene, according to Charles Rowe, a U.S. Coast Guard spokesman.

Two people had been listed in critical condition, but now authorities are saying only one person's condition remains critical.

[Update 1:46 p.m. ET] Coast Guard records indicate that the same Seastreak ferry has been involved in prior crashes, including one in 2009 when the vessel slammed into a New Jersey dock and tore a 2- to 3-foot gash in the starboard bow of the vessel.

A year later, a collision with a dock pile punctured a hole in the port side of the same boat.

[Update 12:33 a.m. ET] Seastreak LLC, the company operating the ferry, has released a statement on its website. In part, it says that "our thoughts and prayers are with those that were injured."

"Seastreak LLC will work closely with the federal, state and local authorities to determine the cause of the accident," the statement says.

[Update 12:28 a.m. ET] Two of the 57 hurt passengers are critically injured, authorities say.

[Update 11:43 a.m. ET] U.S. Sen. Frank Lautenberg, D-New Jersey, releases a statement saying that National Transportation Safety Board chairwoman Deborah Hersman assured him "that this serious accident will receive a full and thorough investigation."

“Ferry systems are crucial for New Jersey commuters, and the public must have every assurance that the ferries they ride are operating safely. I have every confidence in Chairman Hersman and the NTSB, and I know they will conduct a first-rate investigation so we can take steps to ensure that this doesn’t happen again.”

FULL POST

November 2nd, 2012
11:00 PM ET

Headaches, heartache as Sandy’s U.S. death toll rises to 106

Editor's note: Promises of help to those affected by Superstorm Sandy became more specific Saturday, as officials got a better grip on how to overcome power and fuel shortages. Facing a backlash over initial plans to run the New York City Marathon as scheduled, officials canceled the event. Here is the full story and below is the latest news.

[Update at 3:50 a.m.] The number of customers without power dropped to 2.68 million, according to utility companies in 15 states and the District of Columbia

[Update at 10:59 p.m.] Remembering some of those tragically killed - young kids and their parents, alike - by Superstorm Sandy:

[Updated at 10:51 p.m.] President Barack Obama will helm a meeting Saturday morning involving several members of his Cabinet - including Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta and Energy Secretary Steven Chu - and the governors of Connecticut, New York and New Jersey, a White House official said.

Top administration members will spend the day in some of the hardest-hit areas, according to the official. Napolitano will to go West Virginia and Long Island, New York; Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius will visit Brooklyn and Manhattan; Small Business Administration Administrator Karen Mills will head to Norwalk and Bridgeport, Connecticut; and Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan will be in the Rockaways and Breeze Point, New York. Homeland Security adviser John Brennan, meanwhile, will be among the federal officials in Staten Island, New York, as well as the New Jersey cities of Hoboken, Newark and Jersey City.

FULL POST

October 31st, 2012
12:47 AM ET

Sandy derails New Jersey Transit's Rail Operations Center

Hurricane Sandy knocks the New Jersey Transit Rail Operations Center seriously off track.  The storm put the center at The Meadowlands - across from New York City - under 8 feet of water, shorting out the back-up power system and emergency generator.

Officials at the commuter railroad say it will be weeks before service resumes on the New Jersey Coast Line because of damage caused by the storm.  Downed trees cover the tracks in many areas, ripping down power lines with them, while other sections of track are washed out.