Blog: Navy looking to 'see what red flags, if any, were missed'
U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Martin Dempsey prepare to lay a wreath at the U.S. Navy Memorial plaza on Tuesday to honor the victims of Monday's Washington Navy Yard shootings.
September 17th, 2013
06:13 PM ET

Blog: Navy looking to 'see what red flags, if any, were missed'

  • 12 people were killed and at least eight were injured in shooting at Washington Navy Yard, authorities say
  • The shooter, Aaron Alexis, 34, was killed in confrontation with security
  • Alexis was information-technology contractor and former full-time Navy reservist who lived in Texas
  • Live updates below. Also, read the full story and a profile of Alexis.

[Updated 8:13 p.m. ET] Alexis entered Building 197 at Washington's Navy Yard with a small bag that is believed to contain a disassembled shotgun he used in the mass shooting, a federal law enforcement official says. Surveillance video shows Alexis ducking into a bathroom with the bag and leaving it with a shotgun, according to the source.

Alexis had 00 buckshot shells, each of which are packed with a dozen pellets and are capable of causing tremendous damage, the same law enforcement official says.

[Updated 8:08 p.m. ET] Alexis contacted two Veterans Affairs hospitals in and around Washington recently and got treated for sleep-related issues, a law enforcement source says. A second law enforcement source tells CNN that, as far as investigators know now, Alexis sought help for insomnia. But another source said Alexis asked for help because he was "having problems sleeping" and "hearing voices."

[Updated 8:05 p.m. ET] Rep. Michael McCaul, chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, tells CNN that the eight instances of misconduct that Alexis had while in the Navy "were kind of swept under the rug." “There is a tendency to not want to deal with a problem," McCaul says. "It is real easy to just pass the buck along to another military base or, in this instance, to a defense contractor.”

[Updated 8:03 p.m. ET] Navy officers knew about an incident in which Alexis was arrested for shooting the tires of a car - in what he later told detectives was an anger-fueled "blackout" - but admitted him to the Navy and gave him secret security clearance in 2007 anyway, a senior Naval officer told CNN.

"It appears as if investigators were aware of the incident, interviewed him and were satisfied that it did not preclude granting the clearance," the officer said.

[Updated 7:56 p.m. ET] The Experts, the contracting firm for which Alexis worked for about six months over the past year, said it performed two background checks on him and confirmed twice with the Defense Department that Alexis had a secret security clearance. "The latest background check and security clearance confirmation were in late June of 2013 and revealed no issues other than one minor traffic violation," the company says in a statement.

[Updated 7:36 p.m. ET] Alexis paid $419 to buy a shotgun at Sharpshooters Small Arms Range, said the store's lawyer,  J. Michael Slocum. Slocum also said that he made the purchase on Saturday afternoon - and not Sunday, as he had earlier told CNN.

[Original post at 4:14 p.m. ET] Alexis bought a shotgun and about 24 shells on Sunday the day before the shooting from the Sharpshooters Small Arms Range in northern Virginia, the store's attorney, J. Michael Slocum, said.

Before buying the Remington 870 shotgun and the ammunition, he used a store rifle at a practice range, and he was at the store for at least a couple hours, Slocum said.

Video of Alexis at the store has been given to the FBI, according to Slocum.

[Updated 7:27 p.m. ET] Aaron Alexis' dark blue rented Toyota Prius was towed Tuesday from the Washington hotel where he'd been staying, a law enforcement source says.

[Updated 6:29 p.m. ET] Navy spokesman John Kirby says that authorities are looking to "see what red flags, if any, were missed" ahead of Aaron Alexis's mass shooting at Washington's Navy Yard.  Alexis got security clearance in 2007, and it was still valid when he left the Navy in 2011, according to Kirby.

As to Alexis's issues while in the service - including eight "relatively minor" instances of misconduct - the Navy spokesman said, “He wasn’t a stellar sailor, we know that.”

[Updated 6:17 p.m. ET]   Washington, D.C., police Officer Scott Williams shot and killed Aaron Alexis, ending the latter's rampage at the historic Navy Yard, Mayor Vincent Gray told CNN.  Williams is in good spirits after undergoing surgery tied to his being shot in the leg, according to Gray.

[Updated 6:12 p.m. ET] The Washington Navy Yard will be opened Wednesday to "essential" personnel only, says base spokesman Ed Zeigler. "Access to Building 197 is still prohibited," he added, referring to the building where the shooting occurred.

[Updated 4:04 p.m. ET] Police in Newport, Rhode Island, say Alexis contacted them while he was staying there in August, complaining that he was hearing voices and was worried that three people were harassing him, according to CNN's Deborah Feyerick.

Newport police say they contacted the Newport naval base in August about their encounter with Alexis, who was working there as an information-technology contractor.

Alexis told Newport police that during a flight from Virginia to Rhode Island, he got into a “verbal altercation” with someone, Newport Police Lt. William Fitzgerald said.

Fitzgerald says Alexis told police “he was a naval contractor who travels often.” He explained that during a flight from Virginia to Rhode Island, he got into a “verbal altercation” with an individual. Alexis told police he believed that the “individual had sent three people to follow him and to talk, keep him awake and send vibrations into his body," Fitzgerald said.

According to a police report, Alexis said he first heard the people talking to him through a wall at a Middletown hotel where he was staying. He packed up and went to an unidentified hotel on the naval base where he heard the same voices talking to him, so he moved to a third hotel.

According to Fitzgerald, Alexis heard the people “speaking to him through the floor and then ceiling.“ Alexis said the individuals were “using a microwave machine to send vibrations through the ceiling, penetrating his body so he could not speak.”

Fitzgerald said Alexis would not elaborate or tell police what his alleged harassers were saying, but he told police “he never felt anything like this and felt these individuals would harm him.”

Earlier Tuesday, a source with direct knowledge of the investigation told Feyerick that Alexis exhibited signs of mental problems in recent months and tried to get help at a Veterans Affairs facility in Rhode Island.

[Updated 3:27 p.m. ET] Alexis bought a shotgun from Sharpshooters Small Arms Range in the last few weeks, an attorney for the store said, according to CNN's Chris Lawrence.

The attorney, J. Michael Slocum, said Alexis had a valid driver's license, and the gun shop "did the full required background check, the same that's done when someone buys a weapon of any sort." Slocum indicated there was nothing in the background check to stop the sale to Alexis.

Slocum also said the FBI visited the store once since Monday's shooting, and that the store is cooperating with the investigation.

The FBI has said the Alexis used a shotgun in the shooting.

[Updated 2:28 p.m. ET] The news conference is over. Some more highlights from D.C. Police Chief Cathy Lanier: She said that within seven minutes of the first emergency call, police had at least two units inside the building where the shooting was happening.

The first unit arrived at the yard itself within two minutes of the call. It took police a while to determine which building was the shooting site, because callers were giving different building numbers, she said.

Security personnel from several agencies had "multiple engagements" with Alexis before the final shots were fired, she said.

[Updated 2:23 p.m. ET] More from the news conference: D.C. Police Chief Cathy Lanier elaborated on why she thinks the officer who was shot in both legs will make a full recovery, when there had been questions Monday of whether he would walk again.

"We have a very good prognosis from the doctors," Lanier said. She said that because of his personality, she believes that he will eventually be "outrunning all of us."

[Updated 2:15 p.m. ET] More from the news conference: The Washington police officer who was shot in both legs Monday is doing well, D.C. Police Chief Cathy Lanier said. He had surgery Monday.

“We expect he will make a full recovery,” Lanier said.

Earlier, CNN's Chris Lawrence reported that physicians were expected to begin determining Tuesday whether the officer would be able to keep the limbs.

Also, Lanier said at the news conference that there's "no doubt in my mind" that the officers responding to the shooting "saved numerous lives."

[Updated 2:11 p.m. ET] More from the news conference: Alexis arrived in the Washington area on or about August 25, staying in hotels, said Valerie Parlave, assistant director in charge of the Washington FBI field office.

He most recently stayed at a Residence Inn in southwestern Washington, D.C., beginning around September 7, she said. Anyone who contacted him during that time should contact the FBI, she said.

[Updated 2:08 p.m. ET] FBI and other officials have begun a news conference in Washington, updating reporters on the investigation.

Alexis entered the yard's building 197 where the shooting took place with a shotgun, and investigators believe he obtained a handgun inside the building after he started shooting, Valerie Parlave, assistant director in charge of the Washington FBI field office, said moments ago at a news conference. This confirms what federal law enforcement sources said earlier.

[Updated 2:01 p.m. ET] U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel is ordering a worldwide review of physical security measures at all U.S. military installations in the wake of Monday's shooting, a senior Pentagon official said Tuesday, according to CNN's Barbara Starr.

Hagel will order the military to look at all existing security measures to see if they are sufficient and to determine what other measures may be needed, the official said.

At the same time, the Pentagon is still trying to determine what it needs to do to begin a parallel review of security clearances and access standards for contractors and other employees, according to a Defense Department official. Some elements of clearance procedures are handled by other parts of the government so coordination will be required, but the official said it’s expected some review of that element will also take place.

This follow an earlier confirmation from the Navy that it was beginning a similar physical security review at all of its installations.

[Updated 1:13 p.m. ET] Alexis was “having problems sleeping” and was “hearing voices,” a source with direct knowledge of the investigation said, according to CNN's Deborah Feyerick. The source said Alexis exhibited signs of mental problems in recent months and tried to get help at a Veterans Affairs facility in Rhode Island. He had been working in Newport, Rhode Island, as an information-technology contractor in August.

The source also said that the 9/11 attacks triggered Alexis to leave his home in New York City. Alexis could not deal with the attack, left New York and essentially became a wanderer going from place to place – San Diego, Texas, and overseas, the source said.

His father told Seattle police in 2004 after Alexis was arrested there that his son was suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder after taking part in 9/11 rescue efforts, according to police records.

Earlier Tuesday, law enforcement sources told CNN that Alexis recently made contact with two Veterans Administration hospitals for apparent psychological issues.

[Updated 12:44 p.m. ET] A gun store in northern Virginia, Sharpshooters Small Arms Range in Lorton, released a statement in response to inquiries about Alexis. For context: An FBI source with firsthand knowledge of the investigation told CNN that one of the weapons Alexis is accused of using was purchased recently at a northern Virginia store. The Sharpshooters statement, shown below, does not affirm that it sold Alexis the gun.

"Sharpshooters Small Arms Range has been and continues to fully cooperate with law enforcement authorities in their investigation of the events at the Washington Navy Yard," Sharpshooters said. "In light of the many questions surrounding the event, it is not appropriate to provide any comment at this time, except to affirm that Sharpshooters fully complies with all requirements to conduct background checks on all potential purchasers as required by law, and to further affirm that all purchasers are required to comply with all laws concerning allowed purchases."

[Updated 12:06 p.m. ET] The Navy began proceedings in 2010 to give Alexis a "general discharge" from the Navy Reserve because of military and civilian disciplinary issues, but eventually gave him an honorable discharge in January 2011 because of a lack of evidence supporting the sterner measure, a U.S. defense official told CNN's Barbara Starr.

The disciplinary issues include at least eight instances of misconduct while on duty, the official said.

The attempt to give him a general discharge began after the Navy learned of his 2008 arrest in Georgia (on suspicion of disorderly conduct) and his 2010 arrest in Texas (over an allegation that he fired a gun through the ceiling of his apartment), the official said.

Alexis was a full-time Navy reservist from mid-2007 to January 2011.

[Updated 11:53 a.m. ET] We now have all the slain victims' names. The latest five to be released by Washington police are:

– Arthur Daniels, 51, of Washington, D.C.
– Mary Francis Knight, 51, of Reston, Virginia
– Gerald L. Read, 58, of Alexandria, Virginia
– Martin Bodrog, 54, of Annandale, Virginia
– Richard Michael Ridgell, 52, of Westminster, Maryland

On Monday night, Washington police released the first seven names:

– Michael Arnold, 59, of Lorton, Virginia
– Sylvia Frasier, 53, of Waldorf, Maryland
– Kathy Gaarde, 62, of Woodbridge, Virginia
– John Roger Johnson, 73, of Derwood, Maryland
– Frank Kohler, 50, of Tall Timbers, Maryland
– Kenneth Bernard Proctor, 46, of Waldorf, Maryland
– Vishnu Schalchendia Pandit, 61, of North Potomac, Maryland

[Updated 11:46 a.m. ET] It's back to baseball on Tuesday for the Washington Nationals, who postponed a Monday game as the organization allowed the Navy to use one of their parking lots as a site where Navy Yard evacuees could reunite with their loved ones.

The Nationals will wear their "Patriotic Blue" jerseys in the first game of a double-header with the visiting Atlanta Braves, the team said. The first game, to start at 1:05 p.m., is the make-up for Monday's postponement.

The Navy Yard is just blocks from Nationals Park.

[Updated 11:30 a.m. ET] Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus on Tuesday will "order reviews of all physical security at all Navy and Marine Corps installations," a U.S. Navy official told CNN's Barbara Starr.

"The first will be a quick look to ensure all physical security requirements are being met. The second will be a deeper review to ensure the right physical and personal security requirements are in place," the official said.

Earlier, U.S. Rep. Mike Turner, an Ohio Republican and a member of the Armed Forces Committee, said he believed cost-cutting compromised security at the yard, and he wants a congressional briefing from the Pentagon inspector general on a Navy security audit that he says was released after Monday's shooting.

"It is my understanding that the IG report indicates the Navy may have implemented an unproven system in order to cut costs," Turner said. "I also learned that potentially numerous felons may have been able to gain restricted access to several military installations across the country due to insufficient background checks, increasing the risk to our military personnel and civilian employees."

[Updated 11:21 a.m. ET] Arrests don't automatically prevent people from getting security clearance, says Anita Gorecki-Robbins, a military justice lawyer.

Alexis, who had been arrested a few times since 2004, received Department of Defense security clearance so that he could work for The Experts, a subcontractor of HP Enterprise Services that was contracted to "refresh equipment used on the Navy Marine Corps Intranet network," according to a statement released by his employer.

Gorecki-Robbins told CNN's Chris Cuomo and Ashleigh Banfield that the Defense Department can decide to give security clearances to people who have been arrested. In Alexis' case, either the arrests weren't picked up in screening, or "someone did see (the arrests) and decided to give it to him anyway."

[Updated 10:19 a.m. ET] A former Army attorney says the shooting should raise questions about whether military installations should randomly check vehicles.

Alexis entered the Navy Yard because he had a valid military-issued ID and was assigned to work there as a contractor. Greg Rinckey, a former attorney in the Army judge advocate general's office, told CNN's John Berman that the shooting could boost arguments for random vehicle checks, even for people with valid credentials.

Authorities have recovered three weapons from the scene of the mass shooting, including a shotgun that investigators believe Alexis brought into the compound, federal law enforcement sources with detailed knowledge of the investigation told CNN on Tuesday. The other two weapons handguns may have been taken from guards, the sources say.

[Updated 10:09 a.m. ET] To honor the shooting victims, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel and Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Martin Dempsey have just placed a wreath near the "The Lone Sailor" statue at Washington's U.S. Navy Memorial plaza.

Other federal officials are marking the shooting, too. Nearly 10 minutes ago, the U.S. Senate observed some moments of silence.

[Updated 9:59 a.m. ET] If you're wondering how Alexis could have been honorably discharged from the Navy Reserve in 2011 after a pattern of misconduct, a former Army attorney might have an answer.

Greg Rinckey, a former attorney in the Army judge advocate general's office, told CNN's John Berman that a pattern of misconduct doesn't necessarily result in an other-than-honorable discharge but an honorable discharge might not be Alexis' full story, either.

“Most people with patterns of misconduct are discharged usually with an other-than-honorable discharge or a general discharge," Rinckey, of Albany, New York, said Tuesday morning. "I think we need to dig a little bit further into this to see if it was a general-under-honorable-conditions discharge or an honorable discharge.”

Alexis, who served as a full-time Navy reservist from 2007 to January 2011, was honorably discharged after a "pattern of misconduct," a U.S. defense official with knowledge of the investigation told CNN earlier on condition of anonymity. The official did not detail the misconduct.

[Updated 9:17 a.m. ET] Of the eight injured survivors, three were shot and those three were doing better today at MedStar Washington Hospital Center. A Washington policeman is in fair condition, a female civilian is in fair condition and another female civilian is in good condition.

The police officer was shot in his legs. As of Monday night, medical personnel had yet to determine whether he would be able to keep the limbs, CNN's Chris Lawrence reported.

[Updated 9:02 a.m. ET] Alexis, the dead gunman, recently made contact with two Veterans Administration hospitals for apparent psychological issues, law enforcement sources said Tuesday.

[Updated 8:57 a.m. ET] Alexis was arrested in August 2008 on a charge of disorderly conduct in DeKalb County, Georgia, county police said Tuesday.

This is in addition to at least two other arrests, dating back to at least 2004 when he was arrested in Seattle. In that incident, he was accused of shooting out the tires of a man's truck in an anger-fueled "blackout," according to a Seattle Police Department report.

In 2010, Alexis was arrested by Fort Worth, Texas, police but never charged over an allegation that he fired a gun through the ceiling of his apartment. According to records, he told police he accidentally fired it while cleaning it.

[Updated 8:55 a.m. ET] Authorities have recovered three weapons from the scene of the shooting, federal law enforcement sources said. Investigators believe Alexis brought a shotgun into the compound and may have taken two handguns from guards, the sources said.

Initial reports said Alexis used an AR-15 semiautomatic rifle during the attack, but by Tuesday, law enforcement sources with knowledge of the investigation said that was not the case.

It is believed that Alexis had rented an AR-15, but returned it before Monday's shooting, the officials said. Investigators have recovered three weapons from the scene, including a shotgun that Alexis is believed to have brought into the compound. The other two weapons handguns the sources say, may have been taken from guards.

Live blog: 12, plus suspect, dead after Navy Yard shooting
The FBI identified the dead suspect in Monday's shooting rampage at the Washington Navy Yard as Aaron Alexis, 34, a military contractor from Texas.
September 16th, 2013
10:47 PM ET

Live blog: 12, plus suspect, dead after Navy Yard shooting

Shots were fired Monday at a Washington Navy Yard building, killing at least 12 people and injuring 14 others, according to local officials and the Navy.

Also killed was a suspect, Aaron Alexis, a 34-year-old military information-technology contractor and former full-time Navy reservist who lived in Texas, the FBI said. One other gunman may be on the loose, police said.

The incident began about 8:20 a.m. ET when several shots were fired inside the Naval Sea Systems Command headquarters in the southeast portion of the capital. Developments below:

[Updated at 10:47 p.m. ET] Police released the names and ages of seven of the 12 people killed in the shooting. None of the seven was military personnel:

– Michael Arnold, 59
– Sylvia Frasier, 53
– Kathy Gaarde, 62
– John Roger Johnson, 73
– Frank Kohler, 50
– Kenneth Bernard Proctor, 46
– Vishnu Pandit, 61.

[Updated at 10:40 p.m. ET] Alexis had access to the yard because of his contracting work, and he used a valid pass to enter the yard, said Valerie Parlave, assistant director in charge of the Washington FBI field office.

[Updated at 10:39 p.m. ET] Besides the 13 people who were killed, eight people were injured in Monday morning's shooting, Washington Mayor Vincent Gray told reporters Monday night. Three of those were injured by gunfire, and the others had other types of injuries, such as contusions and chest pain.

Earlier Monday night, Navy Vice Adm. William D. French said 14 people were injured. The 13 dead include suspect Aaron Alexis.

[Updated at 10:38 p.m. ET] Washington police are confident that only one person was involved in Monday morning's shooting, and they are lifting a shelter-in-place order for residents who live nearby, Police Chief Cathy Lanier said Monday night. Authorities have said suspect Aaron Alexis, 34, was killed after an encounter with security.

FULL POST

August 13th, 2013
04:24 PM ET

Sandy victims among the 'Oceans 16' Powerball lottery winners

Several of them suffered property losses in Superstorm Sandy. One is the daughter of a man who helped write New Jersey's lottery law.

All are feeling extremely lucky.

Sixteen New Jersey co-workers who jointly held one of three tickets that won last week's $448 million Powerball jackpot came forward publicly Tuesday.

Dubbed the "Oceans 16" - they work for the Ocean County vehicle maintenance facility - the group claims $86 million, or a third of the jackpot's cash-option value. After federal and state taxes, each group member will get $3.8 million.

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Filed under: Lottery • New Jersey • Powerball
Morsy arrested, Muslim Brotherhood spokesman says
Fireworks light the Cairo sky Wednesday as opponents of the now-ousted President Mohamed Morsy celebrate in Tahrir Square.
July 3rd, 2013
10:19 PM ET

Morsy arrested, Muslim Brotherhood spokesman says

  • Egypt's top military leader announces Wednesday night that President Mohamed Morsy has been removed from power
  • Head of Egypt's constitutional court will be temporary president until new constitution is drawn up and new elections can be held
  • The military demanded that Morsy share power with opponents after anti-government protests
  • Morsy, elected last year, refused to comply; mass protests continue to support him
  • Refresh this page for the latest news we're seeing and hearing. Catch up with our full story here.

[Updated at 11:52 p.m. ET, 5:52 a.m. in Egypt] Some 40 anti-Morsy protesters are planning to meet with cleaning equipment to polish up their former protest campground, Tahrir Square.  They have invited over 2,000 people to join them on Facebook

[Updated at 11:03 p.m. ET, 5:30 a.m. in Egypt] CNN's Jake Tapper outlines some fine points of Obama's reaction to the Egyptian military's actions:

President Obama’s statement Wednesday evening about the Egyptian military’s seizure of power from President Mohamed Morsy is as telling for what he doesn’t say as for what he does: he doesn’t mention the word “coup.” He doesn’t call upon the Egyptian military to restore power to the “democratically elected civilian government,” but rather to a“democratically elected civilian government” - in other words, it need not be Morsy’s.

The thinking of the president and senior Obama administration officials, according to a knowledgeable source, is that while the administration is not explicitly supporting the removal of Morsy from power - it expressly did not support the move - it is seeking to now push the Egyptian military in a direction.

If the Obama administration were to use the word “coup.” that would have legal ramifications that would result in the end of U.S. aid. If White House officials were to pull the plug completely, they would be removing themselves from the picture altogether.

[Updated at 10:19 p.m. ET, 4:19 a.m. in Egypt] CNN's Ben Wedeman, who spent time at a pro-Morsy rally in Cairo on Wednesday evening, reported he spoke to one protester who said he felt demonstrators would stay there "until Mohamed Morsy is once again president of Egypt."

Wedeman recalled the exchange early Thursday after leaving the pro-Morsy rally to go to the larger gathering at Cairo's Tahrir Square, where people still were celebrating Morsy's ouster.

Wedeman said that although much focus is on the joy and excitement at Tahrir Square, "there's a significant portion of the Egyptian population (although) I wouldn’t suggest it’s a majority who are very upset at what has happened."

Wedeman, a CNN senior international correspondent who'd previously served as CNN's Cairo bureau chief, said it appeared the overall mood in Egypt would be different than 2011, when then-President Hosni Mubarak was deposed. In 2011, Wedeman said, Mubarak's supporters kept a low profile for months.

"There's not going to be that quiet after the storm this time around," Wedeman said.

[Updated at 10:06 p.m. ET, 4:06 a.m. in Egypt] Get ready for an extremist backlash to Morsy's ouster, says Mohammed Ayoob, Michigan State University professor emeritus of international relations.

"The major lesson that Islamists in the Middle East are likely to learn from this episode is that they will not be allowed to exercise power no matter how many compromises they make in both the domestic and foreign policy arenas," Ayoob wrote for a CNN.com opinion piece. "This is likely to push a substantial portion of mainstream Islamists into the arms of the extremists who reject democracy and ideological compromise."

CNN's Ben Wedeman, reporting from Cairo, also said there's a danger that some members of the Muslim Brotherhood will break from the main group and "challenge (Egypt's new leaders) with violence."

They may take the attitude of "we tried to play the game, our leaders were jailed, our media have been shut down ... so we’re going to destroy the system," said Wedeman, who is a CNN senior international correspondent and had previously been CNN's Cairo bureau chief.

[Updated at 9:23 p.m. ET, 3:23 a.m. in Egypt] U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has echoed Obama's call for a quick return to civilian rule. He appealed for "calm, non-violence, dialogue and restraint."

[Updated at 8:24 p.m. ET, 2:24 a.m. in Egypt] More about arrests in Egypt, from CNN's interview with Muslim Brotherhood spokesman Gehad El-Haddad:

Morsy was arrested by presidential guards at their headquarters, and is being "cut off" from the world, El-Haddad told CNN. "They cut all his access, all his calls. No one is meeting him," the spokesman said.

Members of Morsy's presidential team also were arrested, El-Haddad said.

The head of Egypt's Freedom and Justice Party and the deputy leader of the Muslim Brotherhood also were arrested, according to El-Haddad.

El-Haddad told CNN he understands that hundreds of names have been put on an "arrest list," but "I can't confirm any arrests apart from these."

[Updated at 8:03 p.m. ET, 2:03 a.m. in Egypt] Muslim Brotherhood spokesman Gehad El-Haddad just confirmed his account of Morsy's arrest to CNN by phone.

Presidential guards arrested Morsy at the guards' headquarters, El-Haddad told CNN. He described it as "house arrest." He added that Morsy's presidential team was "entirely put under arrest as well."

[Updated at 7:42 p.m. ET, 1:42 a.m. in Egypt] Morsy is "under house arrest," as are most members of the presidential team, according to a post on Muslim Brotherhood spokesman Gehad El-Haddad's Twitter account.

Reuters also reported Morsy is being held by authorities, citing the Muslim Brotherhood and a security source.

[Updated at 7:27 p.m. ET, 1:27 a.m. in Egypt] At least eight people were killed and 343 were wounded in clashes across Egypt on Wednesday, the day the Egyptian military announced it had ousted Mohamed Morsy as president, according to the state-run al-Ahram news agency, citing the Health Ministry.

[Updated at 7:07 p.m. ET, 1:07 a.m. in Egypt] Egypt's military reportedly is attempting a massive roundup of members of the Muslim Brotherhood, the Islamist movement that helped propel Morsy to power a year ago.

Arrest warrants have been issued for 300 members of the Muslim Brotherhood, and an operation to arrest them is under way, according to the state-run Ahram newspaper website on Thursday, which cited an unnamed security source.

Egyptian security forces also have arrested the Muslim Brotherhood's political party leader, Saad el-Katatni, and its deputy, Rashad Al-Bayoumi, Egypt's official MENA news agency reported Wednesday, citing an unnamed military source.

[Updated at 6:57 p.m. ET, 12:57 a.m. in Egypt] U.S. President Barack Obama, in his first public statement on Morsy's ouster, says the United States is "deeply concerned by the decision of the Egyptian armed forces to remove President Morsy and suspend the Egyptian constitution," and that he has "directed the relevant departments and agencies to review the implications under U.S. law for our assistance to the government of Egypt."

Obama also called on the Egyptian military "to move quickly and responsibly to return full authority back to a democratically elected civilian government as soon as possible through an inclusive and transparent process, and to avoid arbitrary arrests of President Morsy and his supporters."

Here is the full statement, released moments ago by the White House:

"As I have said since the Egyptian revolution, the United States supports a set of core principles, including opposition to violence, protection of universal human rights, and reform that meets the legitimate aspirations of the people. The United States does not support particular individuals or political parties, but we are committed to the democratic process and respect for the rule of law. Since the current unrest in Egypt began, we have called on all parties to work together to address the legitimate grievances of the Egyptian people, in accordance with the democratic process, and without recourse to violence or the use of force.

"The United States is monitoring the very fluid situation in Egypt, and we believe that ultimately the future of Egypt can only be determined by the Egyptian people. Nevertheless, we are deeply concerned by the decision of the Egyptian Armed Forces to remove President Morsy and suspend the Egyptian constitution. I now call on the Egyptian military to move quickly and responsibly to return full authority back to a democratically elected civilian government as soon as possible through an inclusive and transparent process, and to avoid any arbitrary arrests of President Morsy and his supporters. Given today’s developments, I have also directed the relevant departments and agencies to review the implications under U.S. law for our assistance to the government of Egypt.

"The United States continues to believe firmly that the best foundation for lasting stability in Egypt is a democratic political order with participation from all sides and all political parties secular and religious, civilian and military. During this uncertain period, we expect the military to ensure that the rights of all Egyptian men and women are protected, including the right to peaceful assembly, due process, and free and fair trials in civilian courts. Moreover, the goal of any political process should be a government that respects the rights of all people, majority and minority; that institutionalizes the checks and balances upon which democracy depends; and that places the interests of the people above party or faction. The voices of all those who have protested peacefully must be heard including those who welcomed today’s developments, and those who have supported President Morsy. In the interim, I urge all sides to avoid violence and come together to ensure the lasting restoration of Egypt’s democracy.

"No transition to democracy comes without difficulty, but in the end it must stay true to the will of the people. An honest, capable and representative government is what ordinary Egyptians seek and what they deserve. The longstanding partnership between the United States and Egypt is based on shared interests and values, and we will continue to work with the Egyptian people to ensure that Egypt’s transition to democracy succeeds."

The White House Flickr feed released this photo of Obama discussing Egypt with members of his national security team in the White House Situation Room.

FULL POST

June 5th, 2013
02:51 PM ET

Sources: Woman killed in Philly building collapse

  • Four-story building that was being demolished apparently fell onto Salvation Army store in central Philadelphia at about 10:45 a.m. Wednesday, city Fire Commissioner Lloyd Ayers says
  • 14 helped from rubble, 13 taken to hospitals, officials say; firefighters determining whether others trapped
  • Witness Jordan McLaughlin tells CNN affiliate KYW that a building "collapsed the wrong way and landed on a thrift shop" that had people inside.
  • OSHA: This was accident at demolition site (2140 Market St.)
  • Check back here for updates; full story here; Are you there? Send to iReport

[Posted at 2:51 p.m.] A woman has died as a result of Wednesday's building collapse in Philadelphia, two sources close to the investigation told CNN's Don Lemon.

No death was mentioned at the news conference that wrapped up near the site minutes ago.

[Posted at 2:43 p.m.] Fourteen people have been rescued from the site, 13 of whom have been hospitalized, officials told reporters moments ago.

Mayor Michael Nutter said that a search-and-rescue operation continues.

"Keep in mind we did not know, and we do not know, how many people were actually in the thrift store this morning when the wall collapsed this morning," and that's why the search continues, Nutter said.

[Posted at 2:16 p.m.] A Salvation Army official had this to say about the collapse that damaged the Salvation Army store:

"At this time, we are gathering information about the details of the building collapse at 22nd and Market Street in Philadelphia today. Our No. 1 concern is for the safety of our customers and the employees who were involved," Donald Lance, divisional Leader of the Salvation Army's Eastern Pennsylvania and Delaware Division, told CNN's Natalie Apsell.

"We are coordinating with the police and fire Department, the Office of Emergency Management and local authorities," Lance continued. "Also, we have sent our own disaster response team to the site to serve survivors and first responders. We ask for the public to pray for those involved."

[Posted at 2:13 p.m.] Mike Adam, who lives across the street from the site, says he took this picture from his apartment:

Adam told CNN's Brooke Baldwin that he and his fiancee were in their apartment when they heard sirens. He looked out a window and saw people running. Looking out a different window, he saw smoke and rubble.

"A block over, there's a fire department, so they were on the scene almost immediately," Adam said.

[Posted at 2:01 p.m.] While firefighters have been digging through the rubble, people from a nearby market have "graciously supplied (them) and officers with fresh apples and bananas," CNN iReporter Josh Rozell says.

[Posted at 1:30 p.m.] Philadelphia firefighters have just made another rescue, the city's mayor said.

A person who was buried in the rubble "for about two hours" was rescued by city fire personnel, Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter told CNN's Don Lemon minutes ago.

That person has been taken to a hospital with minor injuries, and it bring to 13 the number of people taken to hospitals, Nutter said.

Nutter said he didn't know how many other people might be trapped, noting that officials don't yet know how many people were inside the store.

[Posted at 1:21 p.m.] To give you an idea of where this happened: The site is in a heavily traveled area of downtown Philadelphia near the Mutter Museum, a popular tourist destination that houses medical oddities.

The museum was closed Wednesday due to the collapse, it said on Twitter.

FULL POST

'We will come back strong,' governor vows
This is what remains of Plaza Towers Elementary School in Moore, Oklahoma. Officials say seven children were killed at the school during Monday's storm.
May 21st, 2013
11:00 PM ET

'We will come back strong,' governor vows

  • Revised death toll: 24 killed, including nine children, after tornado blasted Oklahoma City area Monday, especially suburb of Moore, official says
  • At least seven children died in pulverized school in Moore, officials say
  • Moore took direct hits from tornadoes in 1999 and 2003
  • Live updates below. Full story here; check our affiliates KFOR, KOCO and KOKH; CNN iReport; how to help

[Updated at 11 p.m. ET] This post is no longer being updated. For full coverage, check out CNN.com.

[Updated at 10:52 p.m. ET]

About 2,400 homes were damaged in the Oklahoma cities of Moore and Oklahoma City, said Oklahoma Department of Emergency Management spokesman Jerry Lojka. Some 10,000 people were directly impacted by the tornado, he said.

[Updated at 10:43 p.m. ET]

A teacher talks about how she and her students survived the tornado by hiding in a closet and bathroom:

FULL POST

Post by: ,
Filed under: Oklahoma • Tornadoes • Weather
Boston bombings: 'CAPTURED!!! The hunt is over,' police say
Massachusetts celebrates after police captured Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokar Tsarnaev.
April 19th, 2013
10:47 PM ET

Boston bombings: 'CAPTURED!!! The hunt is over,' police say

[Updated 10:47 p.m. ET] Boston Marathon bombings suspect Dzhokar Tsarnaev is at Boston's Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, hospital spokeswoman Kelly Lawman said.

Meanwhile, Senators John McCain and Lindsey Graham congratulated law enforcement on the arrest of the Boston Marathon bombing suspect and noted that the incident should be prosecuted as a terror case. The "perpetrators of these acts were not common criminals attempting to profit from a criminal enterprise, but terrorist trying to injure, maim, and kill innocent Americans," the senators said.

"Under the Law of War we can hold this suspect as a potential enemy combatant not entitled to Miranda warnings or the appointment of counsel."

[Updated 10:11 p.m. ET] "We've closed an important chapter in this tragedy," President Barack Obama said at the conclusion of the Boston Marathon bombing manhunt on Friday night.

[Updated 9:49 p.m. ET] Suspect Dzhokar Tsarnaev is in serious condition in the hospital, Boston police Commissioner Ed Davis said.

But how did law enforcement find suspect Tsarnaev? A Watertown resident saw blood on a boat in his neighbor's backyard, Davis said.

"He opened the tarp and saw a man covered in blood," he said. The man retreated and alerted law enforcement.

Despite being bloody, the suspect exchanged gunfire with authorities from his hiding place, Davis said. Tsarnaev did not have explosives on him at the time of capture, according to Davis.

[Updated 9:41 p.m. ET] Massachusetts is celebrating the collaborative efforts of law enforcement, the public and the media in leading to the capture of the suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings.

"We're so grateful to bring justice and closure to this case," Massachusetts State Police spokesman Col. Timothy Alben said at a news conference in Watertown less than an hour after the capture of suspect Dzhokar Tsarnaev. "We're exhausted, folks, but we have a victory here tonight."

Gov. Patrick Deval praised local, state and federal agencies "who brought their A-game" along with members of the public "for their patience and participation in the case."

"Its a night where I think we're all going to rest easy," he said.

[Updated 9:20 p.m. ET] Now trending ahead of 9:30 press conference: #BostonStrong.

[Updated 8:59 p.m. ET] Law enforcement officials erupted in cheers in Watertown, Masssachusetts, on Friday night moments before Boston police tweeted that the remaining suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings was in custody.

[Updated 8:44 p.m. ET] Boston bombings suspect Dzhokar Tsarnaev is in custody, the Boston Police Department said in a tweet.

[Updated 8:44 p.m. ET] Law enforcement officials repeatedly appealed for surrender by a person believed to be Dzhokar Tsarnaev, the suspect in this week's Boston Marathon bombings, who was inside a boat in the backyard of a house in Watertown, Massachusetts, according to CNN staff at the scene. Among other things, they said, "We know you're in there" and "Come out with your hands up."

[Updated 8:39 p.m. ET] The FBI took two males and a female into custody for questioning Friday evening at New Bedford, Massachusetts, residence believe to have been connected to Boston Marathon bombings suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, New Bedford Police Lt. Robert Richard said.

[Updated 8:32 p.m. ET] FBI agents interviewed Tamerlan Tsarnaev - the 26-year-old Boston Marathon bombing suspect killed following a gunfight with authorities overnight - in 2011 at the request of foreign government, an FBI official said Friday. The other government - who the official would not name - suspected that Tsarnaev may have ties to extremist groups. The FBI investigated, including interviewing Tsarnaev, but the matter was closed after no derogatory information was found, according to the official.

[Updated 8:13 p.m. ET] A person believed to be Dzhokar Tsarnaev, the suspect in this week's Boston Marathon bombings, is cornered on a boat in a yard in Watertown, Massachusetts, law enforcement officials said.

[Updated 8:05 p.m. ET] Authorities believe the person they've engaged in Watertown, Massachusetts, is Dzhokar Tsarnaev, a suspect in this week's deadly Boston Marathon bombings, a law enforcement official told CNN. CNN crews reported hearing multiple explosions near the site where authorities have engaged the suspect.

[Updated 7:46 p.m. ET] As many as a dozen people were being moved away from the scene of intense police activity in Watertown, Massachusetts, including a young girl being carried in a police officer's arms, CNN's David Fitzpatrick reported.

[Updated 7:34 p.m. ET] Authorities have engaged the possible remaining suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings in Watertown, Massachusetts, a senior federal law enforcement official said.

[Updated 7:14 p.m. ET] The Boston Police Department tweeted that there are "police operations" on Franklin Street in Watertown, Massachusetts. CNN crew at the scene heard gunshots and saw several law enforcement vehicles race toward the scene.

[Updated 6:26 p.m. ET] A "stay indoors" order has been lifted in Boston while the manhunt continues for the remaining suspect in Monday's Boston Marathon bombings.

Authorities believe that 19-year-old Dzhokar Tsarnaev is likely still in Massachusetts, state police spokesman Col. Timothy Alben said Friday.

"He's a very violent and dangerous person," Alben said in a news conference Friday. "We do not have an apprehension of our suspect this afternoon, but we will have one."

Massachusetts state troopers will remain in Watertown, where the suspects engaged in an overnight gunfight with police, for at least three more days, Alben said.

Some 200 rounds" of gunfire were exchanged during the firefight, Gov. Deval Patrick added.

The area's public transit system, known as the T, has reopened Friday night after being shut down most of the day, Patrick said.

"We can return to living our lives."

[Updated 5:54 p.m. ET] Fifteen patients wounded in this week's marathon bombings remained hospitalized Friday at Boston Medical Center, the hospital said. One of those patients is in critical condition, 10 are in serious condition, and four are in fair condition. The Boston hospital - one of several in the area treating the wounded - received 23 patients tied to Monday's blasts overall.

Eleven patients wounded in this week's Boston Marathon bombings remain at Boston's Brigham and Women's Hospital - down from the more than 30 patients total the hospital has treated, and not including those treated at its affiliate Faulkner Hospital - the hospital said Friday. One of those patients is in critical condition. Several other Boston-area hospitals are still treating injured patients as well.

[Updated 5:12 p.m. ET] Anzor Tsarnaev - father of Boston bombings suspects Dzhokar Tsarnaev and Tamerlan Tsarnaev - who earlier told Russian national TV network Zvezda that he believed his sons were "framed" tells CNN from Dagestan that he was questioned Friday by Russian security services and then released.

[Updated 4:16 p.m. ET] Connecticut State Police have issued a new vehicle lookout alert in connection with the probe in neighboring Massachusetts: They say Boston-area authorities are looking for a 1995 gray Honda Odyssey with Massachusetts registration 93NN73. A suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing might be in that vehicle, police said.

Connecticut police have issued a few vehicle alerts today, saying they've been monitoring information coming from investigators across the state line.

[Updated 4:05 p.m. ET] Anzor Tsarnaev, father of the suspects, told Dagestani TV netowrk Zvezda that he believes "someone framed" his sons.

"Someone framed them," Anzor Tsarnaev said during the interview Friday in Russia's North Caucasus republic of Dagestan. "I don't know exactly who did it. But someone did. And being cowards, they shot the boy (Tamerlan) dead. There are cops like this."

Anzor Tsarnaev said that whoever was behind the Boston Marathon bombings "is a bastard."

He said he was trying to get in touch with his family members in Canada and the United States, but he can't get through by phone.

"Those are my kids, you understand? Maybe he will be shot dead, too," he told Zvezda. "They will say, well, he had weapons. Kids with weapons? ... They should arrest him maybe and bring him, but alive. Alive. And justice should decide who's right and who's guilty."

Noting that he had lived in the United States, Zvezda asked him whether he ever had problems with the U.S. justice system.

'No, never. But I just didn't face it ever. So can I know about the justice there? I didn't have any problems," he said.

[Updated 3:53 p.m. ET] Boston police say the second vehicle they were looking for today, a vehicle with Massachusetts plate 116 GC7, has been found.

[Updated 3:43 p.m. ET] "Investigators are recovering a significant amount of homemade explosives" from last night's Watertown scenes, and “there is no proof yet of accomplices," Massachusetts State Police Spokesman David Procopio said, according to CNN's Susan Candiotti.

Police had said that the suspects were throwing explosives at them during last night's pursuit in the Watertown area.

[Updated 3:27 p.m. ET] Amtrak service between Boston and New York has been suspended, police say:

Earlier Friday, Amtrak service between Boston and Providence, Rhode Island, was suspended. MBTA public transit service also is suspended in the Boston area.

[Updated 3:12 p.m. ET] A number of Friday evening events have been canceled or postponed in Boston because of the manhunt.

This includes tonight's Red Sox game at Fenway Park, scheduled for 7:10 p.m., and a Boston Bruins game.

[Updated 2:30 p.m. ET] Two students at the University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth, where Dzhokar Tsarnaev was registered, told CNN that they saw him on campus this week, after Monday's Boston Marathon bombing, CNN's Chris Lawrence reported.

Also Friday, a helicopter with a number of law enforcement personnel landed on campus, Lawrence reported.

The school ordered an evacuation of its campus on Friday. The school is located 65 miles south of Cambridge, just west of New Bedford.

[Updated 2:15 p.m. ET] Boston police confirm they're looking for a green '99 Honda sedan with Massachusetts registration 116 GC7.

[Updated 2:04 p.m. ET] Connecticut State Police have issued an alert for another vehicle, saying a wanted suspect in the Boston Marathon attack now could be in a 1999 green Honda Civic with Massachusetts license plate number 116 GC7. The CSP cited Boston authorities.

Connecticut police issued a similar alert earlier today for a different vehicle; that vehicle eventually was found unoccupied Friday in the Boston area, Boston police said.

[Updated 1:51 p.m. ET] More details on the Tsarnaev brothers:

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 19, the Boston Marathon attack suspect now at large, came to the United States on July 1, 2002, at age 8 on a tourist visa, a federal source said. While here, he sought asylum and became a citizen on September 11, 2012.

His older brother Tamerlan Tsarnaev, who was killed in a shootout with police overnight, came to the United States four years after his brother, on Sept. 6, 2006, at the age of 20, the source said. He came legally but was not naturalized. He was a green card holder and in the country lawfully.

See profile of the Tsarnaev brothers.

[Updated 1:23 p.m. ET] Dzhokar Tsarnaev became a U.S. citizen on September 11, 2012, a federal official said Friday. See profile of the Tsarnaev brothers.

[Updated 1:17 p.m. ET] Here's the latest chronology that CNN has on Thursday night's shooting and subsequent manhunt:

The violence began late Thursday with the robbery of a convenience store, according to Timothy Alben, superintendent of the Massachusetts state police. Soon after, in Cambridge, across the Charles River from Boston, Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer Sean Collier was fatally shot while he sat in his car, the Suffolk County District Attorney's Office said in a statement.

Police believe the Boston Marathon bombing suspects were responsible for the shooting.

The two suspects, according to authorities, then hijacked a vehicle at gunpoint in Cambridge, telling the driver that they are the marathon bombers, a law enforcement source told CNN's Joe Johns. At some point, apparently at a gas station, the source said, the driver escaped.

Police, who were tracking the vehicle using its built-in GPS system, picked up the chase in Watertown. The pursuit went into a residential neighborhood, with the suspects throwing explosives at the police. A firefight erupted and ultimately one suspect later identified as Tamerlan Tsarnaev got out of the car. Police shot him, and his brother ran over him as he drove away, according to the source.

Earlier, there had been reports that Dzhokar Tsarnaev escaped on foot instead of by vehicle.

A source briefed on the investigation said Tamerlan Tsarnaev was wearing explosives and an explosive trigger. He died later at Beth Israel Hospital.

Richard H. Donohue Jr., 33, a three-year veteran of the transit system police force, was shot and wounded in the incident and taken to a hospital, a transit police spokesman said Friday. The officer's condition was not immediately known.

[Updated 12:45 p.m. ET] Police are continuing to run down new leads and go door to door in Watertown in the Boston Marathon terror attack investigation, said Timothy Alben, superintendent of the Massachusetts state police. He told reporters that law enforcement will conduct a controlled blast later in Cambridge, an indication that police found suspected explosives.

[Updated 12:44 p.m. ET] Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick says his request for people in the Boston area to stay indoors remains in effect for now. "We know what an inconvenience it is, in Watertown and Cambridge in particular ... but it’s been enormously helpful … to law enforcement.”

[Updated 12:30 p.m. ET] The Kyrgyz government said Friday that the two Boston Marathon suspects moved from Kyrgyzstan 12 years ago to the Russian region of Dagestan, from where the Tsarnaev family emigrated to the United States.

"Given that the suspects left the Republic at the ages of 8 and 15, the State Committee for National Security of Kyrgyzstan considers it inappropriate to link them to Kyrgyzstan," it said.

Read this profile on the Tsarnaev brothers.

[Updated 12:25 p.m. ET] Dzhokar Tsarnaev, 19, was registered at the University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth, which ordered its campus evacuated on Friday. The school is located 65 miles south of Cambridge, just west of New Bedford.

"UMass Dartmouth has learned that a person being sought in connection with the Boston Marathon bombing has been identified as a student registered at UMass Dartmouth," the school said in a news release. "The campus is closed. Individuals on campus should shelter in place unless instructed otherwise."

[Updated 12:06 p.m. ET] Boston bombing suspect Dzhokar Tsarnaev has tweeted since the Boston Marathon bombings on what friends of his tell CNN is his Twitter account.

The tweets included one at 1:43 a.m. Wednesday that said, "I'm a stress free kind of guy."

On Monday at 8:04 p.m. hours after the bombings he tweeted a lyric from a song that rapper Jay-Z has sampled: "Ain't no love in the heart of the city, stay safe people."

On Tuesday shortly after midnight he tweeted, "There are people that know the truth but stay silent & there are people that speak the truth but we don't hear them cuz they're the minority."

[Updated 11:55 a.m. ET] The uncle of the Tsarnaev brothers told reporters outside his home in Montgomery County, Maryland, this morning that his family is "ashamed" to be related to the suspects.

Ruslan Tsarni said the 19-year-old suspect still on the run "has put a shame on our family, a shame on the entire ethnicity." Tsarni urged his nephew to turn himself in.

He said anyone capable of committing such a crime are "losers."

[Updated 11:20 a.m. ET] U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry praised law enforcement in their hunt for the Boston Marathon attack suspects.

"I think it is fair to say this entire week we have been in pretty direct confrontation with evil," he said. "In the past few days we have seen the best and we have seen the worst of human behavior and it is the best that all of us really want to focus on."

[Updated 10:55 a.m. ET] Taxi service in Boston has been restored, police said. The service had been suspended earlier today because of the manhunt in the Boston bombings case.

[Updated 10:52 a.m. ET] More details on the discovery of the vehicle that police had been looking for: Boston police say that it was found unoccupied:

[Updated 10:50 a.m. ET] Another flurry of police activity is happening in Watertown, the Massachusetts community where police say one suspect was killed and another was being sought.

Police are asking reporters to move back and stay down as a number of other officers are drawing guns in a certain area, CNN's Deborah Feyerick reports from Watertown.

[Updated 10:41 a.m. ET] Connecticut State Police say that a vehicle that might be connected to a suspect in the Boston Marathon attack has been recovered in the Boston area. The vehicle is a gray Honda CR-V with Massachusetts plate 316 ES9.

Connecticut police earlier had issued a lookout notice for the vehicle.

This is what Boston police had to say about the vehicle earlier, on Twitter: "Police seeking MA Plate: 316-ES9, ’99 Honda CRV, Color – Gray. Possible suspect car. Do not approach."

[Updated 10:29 a.m. ET] A high school friend of Dzhokar Tsarnaev, the suspect who Boston police say still is at large, is recalling what he remembers about him.

Eric Mercado told CNN that he went to Cambridge Rindge & Latin, a public high school, with Dzhokar Tsarnaev, 19. Both graduated, he said.

"We hung out; we partied; we were good high school friends," Machado told CNN. "We're all, like, in shock. We don't really understand. There were no telltale signs of any kind of malicious behavior from Dzhokar. It's all coming as a shock, really."

[Updated 10:24 a.m. ET] More background on the brothers that several sources tell CNN are the suspects involved in Thursday night's shootings and police chase and Monday's Boston Marathon bombings:

The Tsarnaev brothers were Kyrgyz passport holders, and used those passports when applying for green cards in the United States, an official in the central Asian republic of Kyrgyzstan said, according to CNN's Ivan Watson.

This doesn't mean they were born in Kyrgyzstan or that their family were Kyrgyz natives. Many Caucasus refugees received passports or refugee status in surrounding countries.

[Updated 10:14 a.m. ET] Some background on the brothers that several sources tell CNN are the suspects involved in Thursday night's shootings and police chase and Monday's Boston Marathon bombings:

Dzhokar Tsarnaev, 19, the Boston Marathon attack suspect now at large, came to the United States as a tourist in the early 2000s and asked for asylum while he was here, a federal source said. He was naturalized last year. Tamerlan, the 26-year-old brother who was killed overnight, came "a few years later" and was a green-card holder, not a naturalized citizen, the source said, according to CNN's Mike Ahlers.

[Updated 10:02 a.m. ET] We now have the name of he Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer who was killed Thursday night he was Sean Collier, 26, of Somerville, Massachusetts, according to the Middlesex district attorney’s office.

[Updated 9:48 a.m. ET] An aquatic director at Harvard University told CNN that he hired Dzhokar Tsarnaev as a lifeguard more than two years ago, but hasn't seen him for more than a year.

"He seemed like a very quiet, unassuming young man," the aquatic director, George McMasters, told CNN Friday morning. "He showed up on time, watched the water, rotated from position to position fine, got along well with students and swimmers there at the pool."

[Updated 9:34 a.m. ET] Boston police have released a new photo of Dzhokar Tsarnaev the suspect still being sought in the Watertown area.

[Updated 9:31 a.m. ET] The Boston bombings suspect who was killed in a confrontation with police overnight in the Boston area was wearing explosives and an explosive trigger when his body was recovered, a source briefed on the investigation says, according to CNN's Deborah Feyerick.

Several sources tell CNN that the dead suspect has been identified as Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, and the one still being sought in Watertown is Dzhokar Tsarnaev, 19.

Police have publicly said that the dead suspect is the man that the FBI previously identified as "Suspect No. 1" in the Boston Marathon bombings. They also have said publicly that the suspect that they chased and last saw in Watertown overnight is the man that the FBI said was "Suspect No. 2"; Boston police also have said that they're looking for Dzhokar Tsarnaev.

[Updated 9:16 a.m. ET] The brothers suspected in the Boston Marathon attack haven't been connected to the Russian region of Chechnya for many years, the Chechen president's office said, according to the Interfax news agency.

The Tsarnaev family years ago moved out of Chechnya to another Russian region, lived some time in Kazakhstan, and then went to the United States where the family members received a residence permit, the office said.

"Therefore, the individuals concerned did not live as adults in Chechnya," said Alvi Kamirov, press secretary for Chechnya's president.

[Updated 9:01 a.m. ET] Boston police have now named a suspect that authorities have been seeking this morning. "Suspect identified as 19 year-old Dzhokar Tsarnaev of Cambridge. Suspect considered armed & dangerous," Boston police said on Twitter.

Dzhokar Tsarnaev is a Boston Marathon bombings suspect that police are looking for in Watertown following a chase overnight and shootings overnight, several sources told CNN earlier Friday.

Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, was the suspect who was killed during a police confrontation overnight, those same sources told CNN.

Police have said that the man identified by the FBI as "Suspect No. 1" in the Boston Marathon bombings was killed in the police confrontation. The man identified by the FBI as "Suspect No. 2" is on the loose, last seen in Watertown, police said.

[Updated 8:52 a.m. ET] A recap of the developments that began Thursday night:

The violence began late Thursday with the robbery of a convenience store, not long after the FBI released images of two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings, Massachusetts State Police spokesman Col. Timothy Alben said.

Soon after, in Cambridge, across the Charles River from Boston, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer was fatally shot while he sat in his car, the Suffolk County District Attorney's Office said in statement. Police believe the bombing suspects were responsible for the shooting.

The same two suspects, according to authorities, then hijacked a car at gunpoint in Cambridge. They released the driver a half-hour later at a gas station. As police picked up the chase, the car's occupants threw explosives out the windows and shot at officers, according to the district attorney's office.

Officers fired back, wounding one of the men, possibly the person identified by the FBI as "Suspect No. 1." The man died at Beth Israel Hospital. He had bullet wounds and injuries from an explosion, according to officials. The second man apparently escaped.

Richard H. Donohue Jr., 33, a three-year veteran of the transit system police force, was shot and wounded in the incident and taken to a hospital, a transit police spokesman said Friday. The officer's condition was not immediately known.

[Correction at 1:36 p.m. ET] The 8:52 a.m. entry above initially said that the second man apparently escaped on foot. "On foot" has been removed, as that part no longer appears to be the case.

[Updated 8:44 a.m. ET] Police activity in Watertown where authorities believe they last saw "Suspect No. 2" during a chase overnight seems to be picking up, CNN's Deborah Feyerick reports from the community. A helicopter is hovering over a building, and reporters are being asked to move back from where they were.

[Updated 8:30 a.m. ET] The FAA has ordered a 3.5-nautical-mile temporary flight restriction over Boston "to provide a safe environment for law enforcement activities." The restriction is from surface to 3,000 feet, according to the FAA website.

[Updated 8:21 a.m. ET] “All taxi service in the city of Boston has been suspended pending further notice,” Boston Police said on its official Twitter account.

This meshes with authorities' request that all of Boston and many of its suburbs stay indoors with doors locked until further notice. All public transportation in Boston already has been suspended, schools are closed, and Amtrak service from Boston to Providence, Rhode Island, also has been suspended.

[Updated 8:16 a.m. ET] The Boston-area transit police officer who was shot and wounded overnight is Richard H. Donohue Jr., 33, a three-year veteran of the force, a transit police spokesman said Friday. Donohue was shot during the manhunt for the Boston Marathon bombing suspects.

[Updated 8:14 a.m. ET] Several sources tell CNN that the dead suspect has been identified as Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, and the one still being sought is Dzhokar Tsarnaev, age 19.

[Updated 8:10 a.m. ET] The suspects involved in the Boston bombings are brothers originally from the Russian Caucasus and had moved to Kazakhstan at a young age before coming to the United States several years ago, according to a source briefed on the investigation, CNN's Deborah Feyerick reported.

The older of the two brothers had the first name Tamerlan, had studied at Bunker Hill Community College, and wanted to become a engineer, the source said. He then took a year off to train as a boxer, according to the source.

The source said that a posting on a social media site in his name included the comments: "I don't have a single American friend. I don't understand them."

The source added that it should not be assumed that either brother was radicalized because of their Chechen origins.

[Updated 8:07 a.m. ET] "All of Boston" should shelter in place, Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick has just told reporters. The same applies to suburbs of Watertown, Newton, Belmont, Cambridge and Waltham, he said.

By shelter in place, Deval said he meant people should stay indoors, keep doors locked and not answer doors for anyone except for police.

Patrick also has confirmed to reporters that one Boston bombings suspect is dead and the other is on the loose.

He added:

An Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority officer was "seriously wounded" and is in surgery right now.
An MIT security officer was killed.

[Updated 7:59 a.m. ET] A recap of what authorities are telling Boston-area residents to do: Police ordered businesses in the suburb of Watertown and nearby communities to stay closed and told residents to stay inside and answer the door for no one but authorities.

The subway and Amtrak train systems have been shut down. Every Boston area school is closed.

"It's jarring," said CNN Belief blog writer Danielle Tumminio, who lives in Watertown.

[Updated 7:58 a.m. ET] The Boston bombings suspect who currently is on the run has been in the United States for "at least" a couple years, a federal law enforcement source tells CNN.

[Updated 7:40 a.m. ET] Boston police say on Twitter: "Door-to-door search 4 suspect in Watertown continues. Uniformed officers searching. Community consent critical."

[Updated 7:39 a.m. ET] The suspects in the Boston Marathon terror attack were brothers, a terrorism expert briefed on the investigation said, according to CNN's Deborah Feyerick.

[Updated 7:34 a.m. ET] One of two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombing the man police were looking for Friday morning has a name that is common among people from the North Caucasus, a source with knowledge of the investigation said Friday. That region includes the breakaway Russian republic of Chechnya.

Earlier Friday, The Associated Press reported that the two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings are brothers believed to be from an area near Chechnya.

[Updated 7:32 a.m. ET] Police in the Boston-area community of Cambridge say the public should "clear area of Norfolk Street in Cambridge." "Ongoing investigation. Potentially dangerous," Cambridge police said on Twitter.

[Updated 7:29 a.m. ET] Boston police have given a heads-up to the public: They'll be conducting a "controlled explosion" basically neutralizing a suspicious object near the area of Commonwealth Avenue and Charlesgate.

[Updated 7:28 a.m. ET] Recapping what a doctor at Boston's Beth Israel told reporters this morning about the death of the man police believe is "Suspect No. 1" in the Boston bombings: He had bullet wounds and injuries from an explosion, the doctor said.

The doctor said he didn't know the cause of death, and he didn't know what the explosion was. The suspect was pronounced dead after unsuccessful attempts to reanimate him, a hospital spokesman said.

Police said the man believed to be "Suspect No. 1" was wounded in Watertown near Boston following a pursuit. That pursuit came about after the fatal shooting of a Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer, authorities said.

[Updated 7:03 a.m. ET] The Associated Press has reported that the two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings are brothers believed to be from an area near Chechnya.

[Updated 6:48 a.m. ET] More transportation options in an out of Boston are being shut down as police look for "suspect No. 2" in the Boston Marathon bombings. Amtrak train service between Providence, Rhode Island, and Boston has been suspended, Amtrak said Friday.

This comes after Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority shut down Boston-area bus, subway, commuter rail, and ferry routes.

The FBI on Thursday released this image of what it called "suspect No. 2" in Monday's Boston Marathon bombings. Authorities said Friday that they're looking for him in the Boston suburb of Watertown.

[Updated 6:36 a.m. ET] A number of universities in the Boston area have been closed because of the manhunt for a suspect in the Boston Marathon terror attack, school officials said. They include Harvard University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston University, Emerson College, and Boston College.

[Updated 6:23 a.m. ET] A person who was shot and killed in the Boston Marathon terror attack manhunt is believed to have had explosives on his body, a law enforcement official with knowledge of the investigation said Friday.

[Updated 6:19 a.m. ET] Here's some more details about the public-transportation shutdown in Boston: All Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority service is suspended at the request of the police, Joe Pesaturo, the authority's public information officer, said Friday. This includes bus, subway, commuter rail, and ferry routes in the Boston area.

This comes as police say they're continuing to hunt down one of the suspects in Monday's Boston Marathon terror attack.

[Updated 5:59 a.m. ET] "Harvard University is closed due to public safety concerns. Please continue to watch this page for updates," the university announced on its website.

[Updated 5:55 a.m. ET]: President Obama was briefed overnight on the events happening in Watertown, CNN's Brianna Keilar reports.

[Updated 5:51 a.m. ET]: "Vehicle traffic in and out of Watertown suspended," say Boston Police on an official Twitter account.

[Updated 5:43 a.m. ET]: Mass transit in Boston has been suspended at the request of the police, says Joe Pesaturo, spokesman for the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority.

[Updated 5:37 a.m. ET]: Boston Police, via its official Twitter account, says businesses near 480 Arsenal Street in Watertown, Massachusetts, are closed until further notice. Employees are also instructed to stay home.

[Updated 5:20 a.m. ET]: MIT cancels Friday's classes, according to a letter from Israel Ruiz, the school's executive vice president and treasurer, and school Chancellor Eric Grimson.

"MIT suffered a tragedy last night: an MIT Police officer was shot and killed on our campus in the line of duty," says the letter, addressed to the MIT community. "While the circumstances around the officer's death remain the subject of an active investigation, what is certain is that the officer gave his life to defend the peace of our campus. His sacrifice will never be forgotten by the Institute. We are thinking now of his family, and our hearts are heavy. In consultation with faculty chair Sam Allen, we have decided to cancel classes today (Friday). All employees are encouraged to use their best judgment about whether they are prepared to come in to work today: any absence today will be considered excused."

[Updated 5:03 a.m. ET]: Police in Watertown sending robocalls to residents instructing them to stay indoors, reports CNN's Drew Griffin.

[Updated 4:45 a.m. ET]: One of the suspects believed to have planted bombs at the Boston Marathon is dead after a shootout with police, a police spokesman said.

The FBI on Thursday released this image of who it called "suspect No. 1" the Boston Marathon bombings. On Friday, police said he was killed in a Boston-area shootout with police.

[Updated 4:21 a.m. ET]: A suspect on the loose in Watertown, Massachusetts, matches the description of Suspect 2 a man pictured wearing a white cap - wanted in connection with the bombings at the Boston Marathon on Monday, police said early Friday.

[Updated 3:54 a.m. ET]: Massachusetts State Police, via Twitter: "Police will be going door by door, street by street, in and around Watertown. Police will be clearly identified. It is a fluid situation."

[Updated at 3:48 a.m. ET]: Massachusetts State Police, on its official Twitter feed, warns Watertown residents to stay in their homes and to not answer the door "unless it is an identified police officer." "If any concerns about someone at door, call 911 immediately. Repeat–Do not answer door, stay away from windows, keep doors locked," the state police says in another tweet.

[Updated 2:40 a.m. ET]: Massachusetts State Police spokesperson Dave Procopio said that they believe multiple possible explosive devices were used against police tonight during this incident at Watertown. It was unclear if the incident, which followed a police chase of a stolen vehicle, was related to the shooting on the MIT campus or any other incident in the Boston area.

[Updated 2:31 a.m. ET]: FBI spokesman Martin Feely tells CNN's Susan Candiotti: "We are engaged with our partners trying to determine if there is a connection." CNN's Drew Griffin, who is on the scene in Watertown, Massachusetts, said FBI agents are on the scene.

[Updated 2:21 a.m. ET]: MIT releases statement on shooting death of campus police officer: "MIT is heartbroken by the news that an MIT Police officer was shot and killed in the line of duty on Thursday night on campus, near Building 32 (the Stata Center). Our thoughts are now with the family." http://bit.ly/15lcg2r

[Updated 2:19 a.m. ET]: Boston Police Department's official Twitter feed says "there is an active incident ongoing in Watertown. Residents in that area are advised to remain in their homes. More details when available." FULL POST

3 killed, more than 140 hurt in Boston Marathon bombing
Emergency personnel respond to the scene after two explosions went off near the finish line of the Boston Marathon on Monday
April 16th, 2013
11:05 AM ET

3 killed, more than 140 hurt in Boston Marathon bombing

  • Three killed including 8-year-old boy in bomb blasts near finish line of Boston Marathon, officials say. Area hospitals say at least 144 are injured, including eight children.
  • Two explosions happened at about 2:50 p.m., more than two hours after the first of the race's nearly 27,000 runners had crossed the finish line.
  • Boston.com journalist tells CNN "blood everywhere," people missing limbs.
  • Race called off; Red Cross and Google set up websites to help people find loved ones in the area
  • Full story here; also, see CNN affiliates WBZ; WCVB; WHDH

[Update, 11:05 a.m. ET] This post is no longer being updated. For Tuesday's coverage, please read this story.

[Update, 6:46 a.m. ET] Overnight, President Barack Obama received updates from his assistant for homeland security and counterterrorism Lisa Monaco on the ongoing response efforts and investigation into the explosions in Boston, including the continuing federal support for those activities, a White House official said, according to CNN's Lesa Jansen. The president made clear that he expects to be kept up to date on any developments and directed his team to make sure that all federal resources that can support these efforts, including the investigation being led by the FBI, be made available, the official said.

[Update, 4:32 a.m. ET] President Hamid Karzai expressed grief over the civilian casualties caused by two bomb explosions near the Boston Marathon on Monday.

Denouncing the terrorist attacks in the strongest possible terms, President Karzai said, “Having suffered from terrorist attacks and civilian casualties for years, our people feel better the pain and suffering arising from such incidents.”

President Karzai offers condolences and sympathies to the families of the victims and the people of the United States of America.

[Update, 4:27 a.m. ET] A huge wave of strangers is greeting the many visitors stranded by the Boston Marathon bombings with a massive outpouring of support. "We figure this is the least we can do," said Heather Carey, who offered a couch at the home near Boston University she shares with roommates. "I saw a website with many others offering their spaces like we did. It is awesome to see so many people helping."

The twin blasts Monday that left three dead and more than 140 wounded also left countless people without shelter. Investigators turned the heart of Boston into a crime scene, evacuating several hotels. This left dozens of visitors - some of them international runners unfamiliar with the area - stranded.

By Monday evening, pleas were posted on several websites.

"Me and my friends lost our phone after the explosion," a woman posted on Reddit. "We are visiting from Korea so our English be not very good. My friend is in the hospital now and they say we can not stay over night in hospital."

Another woman posted: "I have nowhere to go."

Quickly, the online cries for help were answered. Websites were flooded with Bostonians offering aid. Even though it was unclear how many people were helped, by early Tuesday morning a Facebook page set up for victims listed more than 100 people offering rooms and rides.

[Update, 4:09 a.m. ET] The Mayor of London Boris Johnson said: "The bombings in Boston are shocking, cowardly and horrific, and the thoughts of all Londoners this morning will be with the victims. Boston is a proud City built on history, tradition and a real sense of community. These attacks were aimed at its core, at innocent men, women and children enjoying a Spring day out at a major sporting event. We do have robust security measures in place for Sunday's London Marathon, but given events in Boston it's only prudent for the police and the organisers of Sunday's race to re-examine those security arrangements."

[Update, 3:35 a.m. ET] The identity of the child killed in Monday’s bombings at the Boston Marathon is 8-year-old Martin Richard, according to The Boston Globe. The newspaper also reported residents in Dorchester gathered at a local restaurant to remember the child Monday night.

[Update, 3:22 a.m. ET] Dr. Ron Walls of Brigham and Women's Hospital, which received 31 patients, said the debris found in some patients' wounds did not appear to be from ball bearings.

"Everything we saw was sort of ordinary ambient material that could have been propelled by the blast but was not added to the device," Walls said. "It was not the kind of things that would be added to a device to make it more injurious than it otherwise would be."

At Massachusetts General Hospital, several patients suffered from injuries to lower limbs that will require "serial operations" in the coming days, trauma surgeon Peter Fagenholz said Monday night.

He said the most serious wounds "have been combined, complex lower injuries that involve blood vessels, bone and tissue."

[Update, 2:56 a.m. ET] Chief Superintendent Julia Pendry, event commander for the London Marathon, said: "A security plan is in place for the London Marathon. We will be reviewing our security arrangements in partnership with London Marathon."

[Update, 2:15 a.m. ET Tuesday] At least 17 people are reported to still be in critical condition. The full horror of Monday's bomb attacks in Boston was reflected in emergency rooms across the city as doctors were forced to perform amputations and treat injuries normally expected on a battlefield.

[Update, 11:41 p.m. ET Monday] Stephen Segatore, a nurse who was at the medical tent near the finish line for the Boston Marathon, said emergency responders immediately went into mass-casualty mode.

"We had full trauma response at the scene," he told CNN. "We had physicians, nurses who are experienced in trauma care. We had EMTs and it was a full Level 1 trauma experience."

Segatore said he treated at least 25 people as those experienced in trauma care stepped forward while others treated people with minor injuries.

[Update, 11:35 p.m. ET] Saudi ambassador to the United States Adel Al-Jubeir condemned the bombings in Boston and offered his condolences to victims' families.

“What occurred today in Boston is a heinous crime which contradicts the values of humanity.” he said.

[Update, 10:52 p.m. ET] The total of injured has risen to 144 people, officials at Boston area hospitals said. That includes three additional patients at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

[Update, 10:41 p.m. ET] A law enforcement source in Boston tells CNN that investigators have a "number of active leads, and some good early progress in the forensics analysis."

[Update, 10:07 p.m. ET] Dr. Peter Fagenholz told reporters that there were 29 wounded people at Massachusetts General Hospital, eight of whom were in critical condition. Many of the people had shrapnel injuries to their lower extremites, he said.

"We have performed several amputations," he said.

There were no pediatric patients among the wounded, he said.

[Update, 9:38 p.m. ET] Dr. Allan Panter, who was near the finish line waiting for his wife who was running the race, told CNN he was standing about 20 to 25 feet from the first blast. He said he treated victims on the street after the explosion.

"I saw at least six to seven people down next to me," he said. "They protected me from the blast. One lady expired. One gentleman lost both his (lower) limbs. Most of the injuries were lower extremities. I could not figure out why the young lady had expired. I could not find any injury on her thorax."

[Update, 9:28 p.m. ET] Bill Iffrig, seen in video wearing an orange tank top and being blown over as he approached the finish line, told CNN's Piers Morgan that he was feeling OK after the blast.

"I got down to within about 15 feet of the finishing apron and heard just tremendous explosion, sounded like a bomb went off right next to me, and the shock waves just hit my whole body and my legs just started jittering around," he said. "I knew i was going down and so i ended up down on the blacktop."

Iffrig, 78, said he was assisted by one of the event volunteers, who helped him up so he could finish the race. After that, the worker looked for aid for Iffrig, who had just a scratch from his fall.

"He insisted on getting a wheelchair over there so we started to do that, but then before that was rounded up, i said my hotel's about six blocks away so I think I can make it okay. So they let me get out of there and I went on home to my wife."

[Update, 8:55 p.m. ET] A Saudi national with a leg wound was under guard at a Boston hospital in connection with the bombings at the Boston Marathon, but investigators cannot say he is involved at this time and he is not in custody, a law enforcement official said Monday evening.

[Update, 8:54 p.m. ET] Three people were killed in the bombings, Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis told reporters Monday night, raising the toll by one.

[Update, 8:52 p.m. ET] The FBI is taking the lead in the investigation, Rick DesLauriers, FBI Special Agent in Charge of the Boston field office, told reporters.

[Update, 8:44 p.m.ET ] The Boston Celtics home game against the Indiana Pacers, originally scheduled for Tuesday, was canceled, the NBA announced. With the regular season almost at its end, the contest will not be made up.

[Update, 8:36 p.m. ET] Investigators have warned law enforcement officers to be on the lookout for a "darker-skinned or black male" with a possible foreign accent in connection with Monday's bombings at the Boston Marathon, according to a law enforcement advisory obtained by CNN.

The man was seen with a black backpack and sweatshirt and was trying to get into a restricted area about five minutes before the first explosion, the lookout notice states.

[Update, 8:35 p.m.] Hospital workers have treated 141 people after the Boston Marathon bombings, officials at those facilities said Monday night. Two people died in the terror attack, including an 8-year-old boy, a state law enforcement source said.

[Update, 8:32 p.m.] A statement has been issued by the race organizers: "The Boston Athletic Association extends its deepest sympathies to all those who were affected in any way by todays events.

"Today is a sad day for the City of Boston, for the running community, and for all those who were here to enjoy the 117th running of the Boston Marathon. What was intended to be a day of joy ...and celebration quickly became a day in which running a marathon was of little importance.

"We can confirm that all of the remaining runners who were out on the course when the tragic events unfolded have been returned to a community meeting area.

"At this time, runners bags in Boston which remain unclaimed may be picked up by runners presenting their bib number or proof of race participation at the Castle, at 101 Arlington Street, in Boston.

"At this time, we are cooperating with the City of Boston, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and all federal law enforcement officials.

"We would like to thank the countless people from around the world who have reached out to support us today."

[Update, 7:57 p.m. ET] Doctors are "pulling ball bearings out of people in the emergency room," a terrorism expert briefed on the investigation told CNN's Deborah Feyerick.

The same source said the blasts resulted in at least 10 lost limbs.

[Update, 7:43 p.m. ET] An 8-year-old boy was among those killed, a state law enforcement source said, according to CNN's John King.

[Update, 7:38 p.m. ET] At least 132 people including eight children have been injured in the bombings, according to Boston-area hospitals. Boston police earlier said that two people were killed.

At least 17 of the injured are in critical condition, and at least 25 are in serious condition, area hospitals said.

[Update, 7:08 p.m. ET] A witness, Marilyn Miller, told CNN that she was about 30 feet away from the first bomb when it went off. The second bomb came about 12 seconds after and about 50 to 100 yards away from the first, according to authorities and an analysis of video from the site.

Miller was waiting for a runner who, it turns out, was probably about 10 minutes away from the finish line.

"We saw injuries all around us," Miller said. Someone was putting pressure on a woman's neck. "A little boy, his leg was torn up. A woman, (people) were (shouting), 'Critical, critical, get out of out way!'"

[Update, 6:51 p.m. ET] At least 110 people have been injured in the bombings, according to Boston-area hospitals.

[Update, 6:49 p.m. ET] Boston cell phone services were overloaded in the wake of the blast, slowing the city's network dramatically and hampering the investigation in the early going, federal law enforcement officials told CNN.

Unconfirmed rumors began circulating on social media and elsewhere that law enforcement had shut down cell service to prevent more explosives from being detonated remotely. But mobile companies were saying that was never the case, CNN's Doug Gross reports.

"Verizon Wireless has not been asked by any government agency to turn down its wireless service," a spokesman for that company told CNN. "Any reports to that effect are inaccurate."

In other media reports, Sprint similarly denied being asked to shut down service.

Online, Bostonians were being encouraged to stay off of their mobile phones except for emergencies and even open up their wireless connections to help take the load off of the cellular data network.

"If you live or run a business in #Boston near bombsite (please) open your wifi for people to use," tweeted Disaster Tech Lab, an Irish nonprofit dedicated to providing technology to assist in emergency situations.

[Update, 6:47 p.m. ET] Initial tests indicate that the two bombs were small and possibly crude, with the tests not indicating any high-grade explosive material was used, a federal law enforcement official with knowledge of the investigation told CNN national security contributor and former homeland security adviser Fran Townsend.

The source said the FBI considers the incident a terrorist attack, "but they've made clear to me they do not know at this time whether those responsible for the attack were a foreign or domestic group," Townsend said.

A woman comforts another, who appears to have suffered an injury to her hand.

[Update, 6:35 p.m. ET] U.S. Rep. Bill Keating, D-Massachusetts, said an unexploded device was found at a hotel on Boylston Street, and another unexploded device was found at an undisclosed location.

Keating, who is a member of the House Homeland Security committee and has spoken to law enforcement sources, tells CNN's Dierdre Walsh that the incidents were a "sophisticated, coordinated, planned attack."

Runners who had not finished the race were stopped before the Massachusetts Avenue overpass on Commonwealth Avenue.

[Update, 6:14 p.m. ET] More from President Obama, who just wrapped up his brief statement at the White House: "We still do not know who did this or why ... but make no mistake: We will get to the bottom of (this). We will find out who did this. We will find out why they did this. ... Any responsible groups will feel the full weight of justice."

[Update, 6:11 p.m. ET] President Barack Obama is speaking about the bombings now: “The American people will say a prayer for Boston tonight, and Michelle and I send out deepest thoughts and prayers to the victims," Obama said at the White House.

A man embraces a young girl after the attacks.

[Update, 5:59 p.m. ET] John Manis, an eyewitness in his 50s, was about 200 feet away from the finish line near the Prudential building when the bombings occurred. He felt the blast to the point that it made him and others around him jump in the air, and some others around him fell down on the ground, he said, according to CNN's Eden Pontz.

Manis said he heard two blasts about five seconds apart. He said there was confusion all around him, and he was hustled into the nearby Mandarin Hotel. Officials wouldn’t let them leave the hotel for a bit, and he says all who were there were all frisked by police. He said that when he left, he saw broken storefronts and lots of blood.

A man comforts a victim on the sidewalk at the scene of the first explosion.

[Update, 5:51 p.m. ET] President Barack Obama is expected to deliver a statement at about 6:10 p.m. ET from the White House.

A runner reacts near Kenmore Square after the two terrorist bombings near the Boston Marathon’s finish line.

[Update, 5:35 p.m. ET] Google has established a person-finder related to the Boston bombings. People who are looking for someone or have information about someone can make reports there.

[Update, 5:31 p.m. ET] Boston police now appear to be backing away from their commissioner's earlier statement that a third incident at the JFK Library 5 miles from the finish line - might have been related to the Boston Marathon blasts.

On Twitter, Boston police say: "Update JFK incident appears to be fire related."

An injured person is taken away from the scene.

[Update, 5:21 p.m. ET] Precautions are being taken at the White House because of the Boston explosions, CNN’s Jessica Yellin reports. See that in the video below, as well as Vice President Joe Biden's reaction to the incident:

[Update, 5:17 p.m. ET] In the video below, a man describes the initial blast, saying the impact was so strong it “almost blew my head off.” He was not injured, but saw many people sustain horrific injuries.

[Update, 5:15 p.m. ET] The Boston Globe is reporting a much higher injury count. They report that more than 100 people are being treated for injuries, citing local hospitals.

https://twitter.com/BostonGlobe

[Update, 5:10 p.m. ET] Hospitals now say they are treating as many as 51 wounded after the bombings. Two people have been killed, according to Boston police.

Emergency personnel respond to the scene after two explosions went off near the finish line of the Boston Marathon on Monday.

[Update, 5:09 p.m. ET] It will take a long time to clear the area, because lots of people dropped bags and whatever else they had when the finish-line blasts happened. Authorities have to check all of those bags, and bomb squads "may be blowing things up over the next few hours" out of precaution, Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis said.

In the words of Boston Globe political reporter Cynthia Needham, on Twitter:

Thousands of runners still had yet to finish the race when the bombs exploded in a spectator area along Boylston Street near the finish line, CNN executive producer Matt Frucci at the scene.

[Update, 4:58 p.m. ET] New details from Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis:

A third explosion happened at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library "about a half-hour ago." The library is about 5 miles southeast of the Boston Marathon finish line.
Police don't immediately know whether that explosion is related to the two near the Boston Marathon finish line.
The two blasts near the finish line along Boylston Street near Copley Square - "happened 50 to 100 yards apart."
"We're recommending to people that they stay home ... and that they don't go anyplace and congregate in large crowds."
Relatives of people who may be missing in the area can call the mayor's hotline at 617-635-4500.
Anyone who has information about the bombings or saw anything suspicious can call 1-800-494-TIPS.

[Update, 4:46 p.m. ET] Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick says “this is a horrific day in Boston."

"My thoughts and prayers are with those who have been injured," Patrick said in a statement released this afternoon. "I have been in touch with the president, Mayor Menino and our public safety leaders. Our focus is on making sure that the area around Copley Square is safe and secured. I am asking everyone to stay away from Copley Square and let the first responders do their jobs.”

A man lays on the ground after the explosions in Boston.

[Update, 4:45 p.m. ET] It appears that so many people are using cell phones in the center of Boston, consistent service is hard to get and the overload is hampering the investigation, two federal law enforcement sources tell CNN.

A person who was injured in an explosion near the finish line of the Boston Marathon is taken away from the scene.

[Update, 4:40 p.m. ET] Another journalist says she saw victims who lost limbs. This account is from Boston Globe political reporter Cynthia Needham:

"Outside MGH: Head of emergency medicine says 19 have been brought to MGH, six critically injured, some with amputations," she posted to Twitter.

Earlier, we noted that Boston.com sports producer Steve Silva reported that he "saw dismemberment" and "blood everywhere."

[Update, 4:37 p.m. ET] Organizers with the London Marathon, scheduled for this coming Sunday, have taken notice.

"We are deeply saddened and shocked by the news from Boston," London Marathon officials said Monday. "Our immediate thoughts are with the people there and their families. It is a very sad day for athletics and for our friends and colleagues in marathon running. Our security plan is developed jointly with the Metropolitan Police and we were in contact with them as soon as we heard the news."

[Update, 4:30 p.m. ET] Boston firefighters have found what they believe is an unexploded device after the blasts, a government official said, according to CNN's Joe Johns.

Police officers with their guns drawn hear the second explosion down the street. The first explosion knocked down a runner at the finish line.

[Update, 4:27 p.m. ET] "I saw blood everywhere," Boston.com sports producer Steve Silva told Boston.com.

Silva told the news outlet that he was near the finish line when the explosions happened. He said he saw a number of injuries in the area where spectators were. He saw "someone lost their leg," and he said "people are crying, people are confused."

"It was just an explosion, it came out of nowhere," he said. "There are multiple injuries. I saw dismemberment, I saw blood everywhere. People are badly injured."

[Update, 4:19 p.m. ET] We have a new injury count: According to hospital officials, at least 28 people are being treated for injuries connected to this afternoon's blasts near the Boston Marathon finish line.

Nineteen were being treated at Massachusetts General and nine at Tufts Medical Center, officials at those facilities said. Boston police earlier put the number of victims at two dead and 22 hurt.

A person who was injured in an explosion near the finish line of the 117th Boston Marathon is taken away from the scene in a wheelchair.

[Update, 4:16 p.m. ET] "People started scrambling, pushing, shoving" when the explosions happened in a sidewalk area along Boylston Street, near the finish line in the Copley Square area, says CNN executive producer Matt Frucci at the scene.

Frucci said he heard the blasts.

"After the dust settled, (I saw) six or seven people strewn about the area where the second (explosion) was.

Emergency personnel respond to the scene after two explosions went off near the finish line of the 117th Boston Marathon on April 15, 2013.

[Update, 4:11 p.m. ET] A Red Cross website has been established to help people find loved ones in the area.

"Individuals can register themselves as safe or search for loved ones," Massachusetts' emergency management agency says.

[Update, 4:08 p.m. ET] At least two people have been killed and 22 are injured in the apparent bombings near the finish line of the Boston Marathon, Boston police say.

An explosion rips through a location near the finish line of the Boston Marathon.

[Update, 4:02 p.m. ET] A Massachusetts General Hospital spokeswoman tells CNN 19 victims have been brought in.

[Update,3:57 p.m. ET] On their Twitter page, Boston marathon officials made this announcement: "There were two bombs that exploded near the finish line in today's Boston Marathon. We are working with law enforcement to understand what exactly has happened."

[Update, 3:53 p.m. ET] New York is taking precautions as a result of the explosions at the Boston Marathon.

In a written statement, New York Police Department Deputy Commissioner Paul Browne said: "We're stepping up security at hotels and other prominent locations in the city through deployment of the NYPD's critical response vehicles until more about the explosion is learned.

[Update, 3:45 p.m. ET] Paramedics were treating several victims at the scene, and police ordered onlookers to back away from the area. Troops from the Massachusetts National Guard were assisting police as well.

Onlooker Josh Matthews said he heard the blast, then saw police running toward the scene.

"We just heard a lot of sirens, and people were kind of frantic, and it was a bad situation, so we got out of there," he said.

[Update, 3:37 p.m.] Four victims of explosions near the Boston Marathon finish line are at the emergency room at Massachusetts General Hospital, a hospital spokeswoman told CNN. She had no information about the victims' conditions.

[Posted at 3:25 p.m. ET] A pair of explosions rocked the finish line at the Boston Marathon on Monday afternoon, injuring at least a half-dozen people, a CNN producer at the scene said.

The blasts occurred a few seconds apart, shrouding downtown Boston's Copley Square in smoke. Paramedics were treating several victims at the scene, and police ordered onlookers to back away from the area, CNN Producer Matt Frucci reported.

The explosions occurred about 2:45 p.m., about an hour after the first runners had crossed the finish line, Frucci said.

3 killed, more than 140 hurt in Boston Marathon bombing
Emergency personnel respond to the scene after two explosions went off near the finish line of the Boston Marathon on Monday.
April 15th, 2013
11:46 PM ET

3 killed, more than 140 hurt in Boston Marathon bombing

  • Three killed including 8-year-old boy in bomb blasts near finish line of Boston Marathon, officials say. Area hospitals say at least 144 are injured, including eight children.
  • Two explosions happened at about 2:50 p.m., more than two hours after the first of the race's nearly 27,000 runners had crossed the finish line.
  • Boston.com journalist tells CNN "blood everywhere," people missing limbs.
  • Race called off; Red Cross and Google set up websites to help people find loved ones in the area
  • Full story here; also, see CNN affiliates WBZ; WCVB; WHDH

[Update, 11:05 a.m. ET Tuesday] This post is no longer being updated. For Tuesday's coverage, please read this story.

[Update, 11:41 p.m. ET] Stephen Segatore, a nurse who was at the medical tent near the finish line for the Boston Marathon, said emergency responders immediately went into mass-casualty mode.

"We had full trauma response at the scene," he told CNN. "We had physicians, nurses who are experienced in trauma care. We had EMTs and it was a full Level 1 trauma experience."

Segatore said he treated at least 25 people as those experienced in trauma care stepped forward while others treated people with minor injuries.

[Update, 11:35 p.m. ET] Saudi ambassador to the United States Adel Al-Jubeir  condemned the bombings in Boston and offered his condolences to victims' families.

“What occurred today in Boston is a heinous crime which contradicts the values of humanity.”  he said.

[Update, 10:52 p.m. ET] The total of injured has risen to 144 people, officials at Boston area hospitals said. That includes three additional patients at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

[Update, 10:41 p.m. ET] A law enforcement source in Boston tells CNN that investigators have a "number of active leads, and some good early progress in the forensics analysis."

[Update, 10:07 p.m. ET] Dr. Peter Fagenholz told reporters that there were 29 wounded people at Massachusetts General Hospital, eight of whom were in critical condition. Many of the people had shrapnel injuries to their lower extremites, he said.

"We have performed several amputations," he said.

There were no pediatric patients among the wounded, he said.

[Update, 9:38 p.m. ET] Dr. Allan Panter, who was near the finish line waiting for his wife who was running the race, told CNN he was standing about 20 to 25 feet from the first blast. He said he treated victims on the street after the explosion.

"I saw at least six to seven people down next to me," he said. "They protected me from the blast. One lady expired. One gentleman lost both his (lower) limbs. Most of the injuries were lower extremities. I could not figure out why the young lady had expired. I could not find any injury on her thorax."

[Update, 9:28 p.m. ET] Bill Iffrig, seen in video wearing an orange tank top and being blown over as he approached the finish line, told CNN's Piers Morgan that he was feeling OK after the blast.

"I got down to within about 15 feet of the finishing apron and heard just tremendous explosion, sounded like a bomb went off right next to me, and the shock waves just hit my whole body and my legs just started jittering around," he said. "I knew i was going down and so i ended up down on the blacktop."

Iffrig, 78, said he was assisted by one of the event volunteers, who helped him up so he could finish the race. After that, the worker looked for aid for Iffrig, who had just a scratch from his fall.

"He insisted on getting a wheelchair over there so we started to do that, but then before that was rounded up, i said my hotel's about six blocks away so I think I can make it okay. So they let me get out of there and I went on home to my wife."

[Update, 8:55 p.m. ET] A Saudi national with a leg wound was under guard at a Boston hospital in connection with the bombings at the Boston Marathon, but investigators cannot say he is involved at this time and he is not in custody, a law enforcement official said Monday evening.

[Update, 8:54 p.m. ET] Three people were killed in the bombings, Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis told reporters Monday night, raising the toll by one.

[Update, 8:52 p.m. ET] The FBI is taking the lead in the investigation, Rick DesLauriers, FBI Special Agent in Charge of the Boston field office, told reporters.

[Update, 8:44 p.m.ET ] The Boston Celtics home game against the Indiana Pacers, originally scheduled for Tuesday, was canceled, the NBA announced. With the regular season almost at its end, the contest will not be made up.

[Update, 8:36 p.m. ET] Investigators have warned law enforcement officers to be on the lookout for a "darker-skinned or black male" with a possible foreign accent in connection with Monday's bombings at the Boston Marathon, according to a law enforcement advisory obtained by CNN.

The man was seen with a black backpack and sweatshirt and was trying to get into a restricted area about five minutes before the first explosion, the lookout notice states.

[Update, 8:35 p.m.] Hospital workers have treated 141 people after the Boston Marathon bombings, officials at those facilities said Monday night. Two people died in the terror attack, including an 8-year-old boy, a state law enforcement source said.

[Update, 8:32 p.m.]  A statement has been issued by the race organizers: "The Boston Athletic Association extends its deepest sympathies to all those who were affected in any way by todays events.

"Today is a sad day for the City of Boston, for the running community, and for all those who were here to enjoy the 117th running of the Boston Marathon. What was intended to be a day of joy ...and celebration quickly became a day in which running a marathon was of little importance.

"We can confirm that all of the remaining runners who were out on the course when the tragic events unfolded have been returned to a community meeting area.

"At this time, runners bags in Boston which remain unclaimed may be picked up by runners presenting their bib number or proof of race participation at the Castle, at 101 Arlington Street, in Boston.

"At this time, we are cooperating with the City of Boston, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and all federal law enforcement officials.

"We would like to thank the countless people from around the world who have reached out to support us today."

[Update, 7:57 p.m. ET] Doctors are "pulling ball bearings out of people in the emergency room," a terrorism expert briefed on the investigation told CNN's Deborah Feyerick.

The same source said the blasts resulted in at least 10 lost limbs.

[Update, 7:43 p.m. ET] An 8-year-old boy was among those killed, a state law enforcement source said, according to CNN's John King.

[Update, 7:38 p.m. ET] At least 132 people including eight children have been injured in the bombings, according to Boston-area hospitals. Boston police earlier said that two people were killed.

At least 17 of the injured are in critical condition, and at least 25 are in serious condition, area hospitals said.

[Update, 7:08 p.m. ET] A witness, Marilyn Miller, told CNN that she was about 30 feet away from the first bomb when it went off. The second bomb came about 12 seconds after and about 50 to 100 yards away from the first, according to authorities and an analysis of video from the site.

Miller was waiting for a runner who, it turns out, was probably about 10 minutes away from the finish line.

"We saw injuries all around us," Miller said. Someone was putting pressure on a woman's neck. "A little boy, his leg was torn up. A woman, (people) were (shouting), 'Critical, critical, get out of out way!'"

[Update, 6:51 p.m. ET] At least 110 people have been injured in the bombings, according to Boston-area hospitals.

[Update, 6:49 p.m. ET] Boston cell phone services were overloaded in the wake of the blast, slowing the city's network dramatically and hampering the investigation in the early going, federal law enforcement officials told CNN.

Unconfirmed rumors began circulating on social media and elsewhere that law enforcement had shut down cell service to prevent more explosives from being detonated remotely. But mobile companies were saying that was never the case, CNN's Doug Gross reports.

"Verizon Wireless has not been asked by any government agency to turn down its wireless service," a spokesman for that company told CNN. "Any reports to that effect are inaccurate."

In other media reports, Sprint similarly denied being asked to shut down service.

Online, Bostonians were being encouraged to stay off of their mobile phones except for emergencies and even open up their wireless connections to help take the load off of the cellular data network.

"If you live or run a business in #Boston near bombsite (please) open your wifi for people to use," tweeted Disaster Tech Lab, an Irish nonprofit dedicated to providing technology to assist in emergency situations.

[Update, 6:47 p.m. ET] Initial tests indicate that the two bombs were small and possibly crude, with the tests not indicating any high-grade explosive material was used, a federal law enforcement official with knowledge of the investigation told CNN national security contributor and former homeland security adviser Fran Townsend.

The source said the FBI considers the incident a terrorist attack, "but they've made clear to me they do not know at this time whether those responsible for the attack were a foreign or domestic group," Townsend said.

A woman comforts another, who appears to have suffered an injury to her hand.

[Update, 6:35 p.m. ET] U.S. Rep. Bill Keating, D-Massachusetts, said an unexploded device was found at a hotel on Boylston Street, and another unexploded device was found at an undisclosed location.

Keating, who is a member of the House Homeland Security committee and has spoken to law enforcement sources, tells CNN's Dierdre Walsh that the incidents were a "sophisticated, coordinated, planned attack."

Runners who had not finished the race were stopped before the Massachusetts Avenue overpass on Commonwealth Avenue.

[Update, 6:14 p.m. ET] More from President Obama, who just wrapped up his brief statement at the White House: "We still do not know who did this or why ... but make no mistake: We will get to the bottom of (this). We will find out who did this. We will find out why they did this. ... Any responsible groups will feel the full weight of justice."

[Update, 6:11 p.m. ET] President Barack Obama is speaking about the bombings now: “The American people will say a prayer for Boston tonight, and Michelle and I send out deepest thoughts and prayers to the victims," Obama said at the White House.

A man embraces a young girl after the attacks.

[Update, 5:59 p.m. ET] John Manis, an eyewitness in his 50s, was about 200 feet away from the finish line near the Prudential building when the bombings occurred. He felt the blast to the point that it made him and others around him jump in the air, and some others around him fell down on the ground, he said, according to CNN's Eden Pontz.

Manis said he heard two blasts about five seconds apart. He said there was confusion all around him, and he was hustled into the nearby Mandarin Hotel. Officials wouldn’t let them leave the hotel for a bit, and he says all who were there were all frisked by police. He said that when he left, he saw broken storefronts and lots of blood.

A man comforts a victim on the sidewalk at the scene of the first explosion.

[Update, 5:51 p.m. ET] President Barack Obama is expected to deliver a statement at about 6:10 p.m. ET from the White House.

A runner reacts near Kenmore Square after the two terrorist bombings near the Boston Marathon’s finish line.

[Update, 5:35 p.m. ET] Google has established a person-finder related to the Boston bombings. People who are looking for someone or have information about someone can make reports there.

[Update, 5:31 p.m. ET] Boston police now appear to be backing away from their commissioner's earlier statement that a third incident at the JFK Library 5 miles from the finish line - might have been related to the Boston Marathon blasts.

On Twitter, Boston police say: "Update JFK incident appears to be fire related."

An injured person is taken away from the scene.

[Update, 5:21 p.m. ET] Precautions are being taken at the White House because of the Boston explosions, CNN’s Jessica Yellin reports. See that in the video below, as well as Vice President Joe Biden's reaction to the incident:

[Update, 5:17 p.m. ET] In the video below, a man describes the initial blast, saying the impact was so strong it “almost blew my head off.” He was not injured, but saw many people sustain horrific injuries.

[Update, 5:15 p.m. ET] The Boston Globe is reporting a much higher injury count. They report that more than 100 people are being treated for injuries, citing local hospitals.

https://twitter.com/BostonGlobe

[Update, 5:10 p.m. ET] Hospitals now say they are treating as many as 51 wounded after the bombings. Two people have been killed, according to Boston police.

Emergency personnel respond to the scene after two explosions went off near the finish line of the Boston Marathon on Monday.

[Update, 5:09 p.m. ET] It will take a long time to clear the area, because lots of people dropped bags and whatever else they had when the finish-line blasts happened. Authorities have to check all of those bags, and bomb squads "may be blowing things up over the next few hours" out of precaution, Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis said.

In the words of Boston Globe political reporter Cynthia Needham, on Twitter:

Thousands of runners still had yet to finish the race when the bombs exploded in a spectator area along Boylston Street near the finish line, CNN executive producer Matt Frucci at the scene.

[Update, 4:58 p.m. ET] New details from Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis:

A third explosion happened at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library "about a half-hour ago." The library is about 5 miles southeast of the Boston Marathon finish line.
Police don't immediately know whether that explosion is related to the two near the Boston Marathon finish line.
The two blasts near the finish line along Boylston Street near Copley Square - "happened 50 to 100 yards apart."
"We're recommending to people that they stay home ... and that they don't go anyplace and congregate in large crowds."
Relatives of people who may be missing in the area can call the mayor's hotline at 617-635-4500.
Anyone who has information about the bombings or saw anything suspicious can call 1-800-494-TIPS.

[Update, 4:46 p.m. ET] Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick says “this is a horrific day in Boston."

"My thoughts and prayers are with those who have been injured," Patrick said in a statement released this afternoon. "I have been in touch with the president, Mayor Menino and our public safety leaders. Our focus is on making sure that the area around Copley Square is safe and secured. I am asking everyone to stay away from Copley Square and let the first responders do their jobs.”

A man lays on the ground after the explosions in Boston.

[Update, 4:45 p.m. ET] It appears that so many people are using cell phones in the center of Boston, consistent service is hard to get and the overload is hampering the investigation, two federal law enforcement sources tell CNN.

A person who was injured in an explosion near the finish line of the Boston Marathon is taken away from the scene.

[Update, 4:40 p.m. ET] Another journalist says she saw victims who lost limbs. This account is from Boston Globe political reporter Cynthia Needham:

"Outside MGH: Head of emergency medicine says 19 have been brought to MGH, six critically injured, some with amputations," she posted to Twitter.

Earlier, we noted that Boston.com sports producer Steve Silva reported that he "saw dismemberment" and "blood everywhere."

[Update, 4:37 p.m. ET] Organizers with the London Marathon, scheduled for this coming Sunday, have taken notice.

"We are deeply saddened and shocked by the news from Boston," London Marathon officials said Monday. "Our immediate thoughts are with the people there and their families. It is a very sad day for athletics and for our friends and colleagues in marathon running. Our security plan is developed jointly with the Metropolitan Police and we were in contact with them as soon as we heard the news."

[Update, 4:30 p.m. ET] Boston firefighters have found what they believe is an unexploded device after the blasts, a government official said, according to CNN's Joe Johns.

Police officers with their guns drawn hear the second explosion down the street. The first explosion knocked down a runner at the finish line.

[Update, 4:27 p.m. ET] "I saw blood everywhere," Boston.com sports producer Steve Silva told Boston.com.

Silva told the news outlet that he was near the finish line when the explosions happened. He said he saw a number of injuries in the area where spectators were. He saw "someone lost their leg," and he said "people are crying, people are confused."

"It was just an explosion, it came out of nowhere," he said. "There are multiple injuries. I saw dismemberment, I saw blood everywhere. People are badly injured."

[Update, 4:19 p.m. ET] We have a new injury count: According to hospital officials, at least 28 people are being treated for injuries connected to this afternoon's blasts near the Boston Marathon finish line.

Nineteen were being treated at Massachusetts General and nine at Tufts Medical Center, officials at those facilities said. Boston police earlier put the number of victims at two dead and 22 hurt.

A person who was injured in an explosion near the finish line of the 117th Boston Marathon is taken away from the scene in a wheelchair.

[Update, 4:16 p.m. ET] "People started scrambling, pushing, shoving" when the explosions happened in a sidewalk area along Boylston Street, near the finish line in the Copley Square area, says CNN executive producer Matt Frucci at the scene.

Frucci said he heard the blasts.

"After the dust settled, (I saw) six or seven people strewn about the area where the second (explosion) was.

Emergency personnel respond to the scene after two explosions went off near the finish line of the 117th Boston Marathon on April 15, 2013.

[Update, 4:11 p.m. ET] A Red Cross website has been established to help people find loved ones in the area.

"Individuals can register themselves as safe or search for loved ones," Massachusetts' emergency management agency says.

[Update, 4:08 p.m. ET] At least two people have been killed and 22 are injured in the apparent bombings near the finish line of the Boston Marathon, Boston police say.

An explosion rips through a location near the finish line of the Boston Marathon.

[Update, 4:02 p.m. ET]  A Massachusetts General Hospital spokeswoman tells CNN 19 victims  have been brought in.

[Update,3:57 p.m. ET] On their Twitter page, Boston marathon officials made this announcement: "There were two bombs that exploded near the finish line in today's Boston Marathon. We are working with law enforcement to understand what exactly has happened."

[Update, 3:53 p.m. ET] New York is taking precautions as a result of the explosions at the Boston Marathon.

In a written statement, New York Police Department Deputy Commissioner Paul Browne said: "We're stepping up security at hotels and other prominent locations in the city through deployment of the NYPD's critical response vehicles until more about the explosion is learned.

[Update, 3:45 p.m. ET] Paramedics were treating several victims at the scene, and police ordered onlookers to back away from the area. Troops from the Massachusetts National Guard were assisting police as well.

Onlooker Josh Matthews said he heard the blast, then saw police running toward the scene.

"We just heard a lot of sirens, and people were kind of frantic, and it was a bad situation, so we got out of there," he said.

[Update, 3:37 p.m.] Four victims of explosions near the Boston Marathon finish line are at the emergency room at Massachusetts General Hospital, a hospital spokeswoman told CNN. She had no information about the victims' conditions.

[Posted at 3:25 p.m. ET] A pair of explosions rocked the finish line at the Boston Marathon on Monday afternoon, injuring at least a half-dozen people, a CNN producer at the scene said.

The blasts occurred a few seconds apart, shrouding downtown Boston's Copley Square in smoke. Paramedics were treating several victims at the scene, and police ordered onlookers to back away from the area, CNN Producer Matt Frucci reported.

The explosions occurred about 2:45 p.m., about an hour after the first runners had crossed the finish line, Frucci said.

April 15th, 2013
12:35 PM ET

Ethiopia's Desisa, Kenya's Jeptoo win Boston Marathon

A strong kick won the Boston Marathon for Ethiopia's Lelisa Desisa.

Bunched up with two competitors with a mile left, Desisa pulled away in the last few blocks, winning the men's division Monday with a time of 2:10:22.

Kenya's Micah Kogo (2:10:27) and Ethiopia's Gebregziabher Gebremariam (2:10:28) finished second and third. American Jason Hartmann, of Colorado, finished fourth (2:12:12).

In the women's division, Kenya's Rita Jeptoo held off last year's champion to win her second Boston Marathon in seven years with a time of 2:26:25.

Last year's winner, Sharon Cherop of Kenya, finished third (2:27:01) behind Meseret Hailu of Ethiopia (2:26:58).

American Shalane Flanagan, of Oregon, finished fourth (2:27:08).

Post by:
Filed under: Boston • Massachusetts • Running • Sports
April 15th, 2013
08:23 AM ET

Interpol issues notice for escaped gangster

Interpol has issued an international wanted notice for a French gangster who authorities say used explosives as part of a brazen escape from a prison in Lille over the weekend, the organization said Monday.

Redoine Faid held five people, including four guards, at gunpoint at the detention center in the city in northern France on Saturday, officials said. He then burst his way to freedom by detonating explosives that destroyed five doors, penitentiary union spokesman Etienne Dobrometz told CNN affiliate BFMTV.

Interpol announced Monday that it issued its wanted notice, known as a red notice, within hours of Faid's escape. A European arrest warrant covering 26 countries also was issued for him Saturday.

Post by: ,
Filed under: Crime • France
Newtown probe: Shooting took under 5 minutes
Authorities say Adam Lanza killed himself after killing 20 students and six women at a Connecticut elementary school.
March 28th, 2013
01:51 PM ET

Newtown probe: Shooting took under 5 minutes

  • Prosecutors release new documents related to December's shootings at school in Newtown, Connecticut
  • Documents: Investigators found a gun safe in shooter Adam Lanza's room
  • Documents: 1,600 rounds of ammunition found in Lanza's home
  • Police say Adam Lanza, 20, killed his mother, then 20 children and six staff members at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut before killing himself
  • People who knew Lanza described him as quiet, smart, socially awkward. Connecticut's medical examiner has said he was told that Lanza had Asperger's syndrome.
  • Live updates below. Also, read the full story; and see the documents

[Updated at 1:51 p.m. ET] This live blog is wrapping up, but please check out our full story for the latest about today's document release.

[Updated at 1:48 p.m. ET] One of the warrants released Thursday cites an interview with a person who said that Lanza rarely left his home, that he was a shut-in, "and an avid gamer who plays Call of Duty, amongst other games." "Call of Duty" is a military-style war game.

In the house, according to the documents, were several books one titled "NRA guide to the basics of pistol shooting," another about Asperger syndrome and one on autism. Both are developmental disorders that are not typically associated with violence.

Police also found a 2008 New York Times article about a shooting at Northern Illinois University. Police took from the house an NRA certificate for Nancy Lanza, a receipt for a shooting range in Oklahoma, a book titled "Train your brain to get happy," and three photographs "of what appears to be a deceased human covered with plastic and what appears to be blood."

As noted below, the NRA issued a statement today saying neither Lanza nor his mother were members.

[Updated at 1:45 p.m. ET] The main details of the shooting have long been known: The carnage began on the morning of December 14, when Lanza fatally shot his 52-year-old mother, Nancy Lanza, with a .22 caliber rifle.

But some of the details are new. "There was no indication of a struggle," according to a statement from Stephen J. Sedensky III, state's attorney for the judicial district of Danbury. The statement came with Thursday's release of five search warrants and related documents.

Lanza shot his mother in the forehead, one of the search warrants says.

Laden with weapons and ammunition, Lanza then went to the elementary school, shooting his way into the building where he killed the 26 victims with a Bushmaster .223 caliber model XM15 rifle, according to Sedensky.

The rampage ended when Lanza, using a Glock 10 mm handgun, shot himself.

Attached to the rifle police found a 30-round capacity magazine that still had 14 bullets Sedensky said, and a search of Lanza's body found that he was carrying more ammunition for the handguns as well as three more 30-round magazines for the Bushmaster, each fully loaded.

"Located in the area of the shootings were six additional 30-round magazines," Sedensky said in his statement, three of them empty and the others holding 10, 11, and 13 rounds. Police found 154 spent .223 caliber casings at the school.

All of the guns appear to have been bought by Lanza's mother, the state's attorney said.

[Updated at 12:59 p.m. ET] We've gotten all the documents together in one place. Here are the documents that Connecticut prosecutors released today in the Newtown investigation.

[Updated at 12:35 p.m. ET] Back to today's Newtown document release. The National Rifle Association has issued a statement, apparently reacting to what the papers say about investigators finding NRA certificates for Lanza and his mother, Nancy.

"There is no record of a member relationship between Newtown killer Adam Lanza, nor between Nancy Lanza, A. Lanza or N. Lanza with the National Rifle Association," the NRA statement said. "Reporting to the contrary is reckless, false and defamatory."

This page from one of the search warrants released in the Newtown case Thursday mentions investigators found an "Adam Lanza National Rifle Association certificate."

FULL POST

DOMA plaintiff: Case 'went beautifully'
March 27th, 2013
01:20 PM ET

DOMA plaintiff: Case 'went beautifully'

  • Today's arguments focused on federal Defense of Marriage Act.
  • It denies Social Security, other spousal benefits to same-sex couples.
  • The court heard 80 minutes of arguments yesterday focused on California same-sex marriage ban.
  • Live updates below. Also, read the full story; and share your thoughts.

[Updated at 1:36 p.m.] We're wrapping up Day 2 of the same-sex marriage court debate here - check out our main story for more detail and analysis as it comes today. As always, we want to hear from you.

[Updated at 1:20 p.m.] "I'm very optimistic that DOMA will be struck down, it has no rational basis for being," House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi said just now. Pelosi was at the Supreme Court to hear arguments over DOMA and California's Proposition 8 over the past two days.

Pelosi's district has been at the epicenter of gay rights for decades. She called the oral arguments at the Supreme Court "thrilling."

FULL POST

Supreme Court appears deeply divided over same-sex marriage
March 26th, 2013
12:40 PM ET

Supreme Court appears deeply divided over same-sex marriage

  • The Supreme Court is hearing two cases this week in the appeals to state and federal laws restricting same-sex marriage.
  • The court today first tackles an appeal of California's ban on same-sex marriage, known as Proposition 8.
  • Tomorrow, the justices will hear oral arguments over the federal Defense of Marriage Act.
  • Live updates below. Also, read the full story.

[Updated at 12:48 p.m. ET] We're signing off on this end for now - check out our main story for more detail and analysis as it comes today. We answer your questions here, and want to hear from you here.

Don't forget to join us again here tomorrow, when the Supreme Court hears the second round of debate on same-sex marriage: the Defense of Marriage Act.

[Updated at 12:31 p.m. ET] Director Rob Reiner, who watched today’s oral arguments, is a vocal critic against Proposition 8. Here's what he had to say after court adjourned:

“Today is a historic day for all those who believe in freedom and equality. After more than four years of working our case through victories at the federal District and Circuit courts, we finally had an opportunity today to present our arguments in support of marriage equality for gay and lesbian Americans before the highest court in the land. This case has always been about the love shared by two individuals and about the central promise from our nation’s founding that all men are created equal and are endowed with inalienable rights, including the pursuit of happiness.

[Updated at 12:11 p.m. ET] Andrew Pugno, general counsel for ProtectMarriage.com, tells reporters outside the court that he believes both sides of the argument have agreed that it is impossible to know with certainly how society would change by redefining "a fundamental institution such as marriage.

[Updated at 12:04 p.m. ET] “Today we feel we clearly presented the winning case for marriage,” says Andrew Pugno, general counsel for ProtectMarriage.com, who is speaking with reporters now.

[Updated at 12:01 p.m. ET] Charles Cooper, lead counsel defending Proposition 8, told reporters that he couldn't sum up his argument in a couple of sentences. "We believe Proposition 8 is constitutional," he said, making a brief statement.

[Updated at 11:48 a.m. ET] Kris Perry, a plaintiff in the Prop 8 case, just spoke, saying: "In this country as children, we learn that there's a founding principle, that all men and women are created equal. … Unfortunately with the passage of Proposition 8, we learned that there are group of people in California who are not being treated equally."

"We look forward to a day when prop 8 is officially eliminated and equality is restored to the state of California."

[Updated at 11:45 a.m. ET] Republican Ted Olson and Democrat David Boies, who joined forces to argue against Prop 8, are speaking outside the courthouse now. What's important from today, Olson said, is "the American people were listening to the argument. The other side, nobody really offered a defense."

"We're very gratified they listened, they heard, they asked hard questions, (but) there is no denying where the right is, and we hope the court (rules that way) in June."

[Updated at 11:43 a.m. ET] According to Toobin, there were a lot of questions along these lines from Justices Scalia and Alito: We don’t know the effects of same sex parenting on children, so why don’t we wait and let the states go experiment? Why do we, the Supreme Court, have to get involved in this process?

Toobin said Roberts also seemed sympathetic to these questions.

[Updated at 11:39 a.m. ET] The attorney general and the governor of California have refused to defend Prop 8. So the question, Toobin says, is "Who can defend the law? Who has the standing?" The answer to that question will be key to resolving the case.

Conservative Justices Scalia, Alito and Roberts were "very hostile of idea of the court imposing same sex marriage," according to Toobin. The four Democratic justices seemed favorably disposed.

Justice Kennedy seemed like he was in the middle, he said things that would "give comfort for both sides," Toobin says. Kennedy suggested the issue was brought prematurely before the court.

[Updated at 11:37 a.m. ET] The justices seemed very focused on how Prop 8 affects children, with Justice Kagan at some point suggesting that California have a law allowing same-sex marriage for people past child-bearing age, Toobin said.

Kagan said, according to Toobin: “I assure you if two 55 year old people, there aren’t a lot of children (coming from that marriage).”

[Updated at 11:34 a.m. ET] "This was a deeply divided Supreme Court, a court that seemed groping for answers," CNN senior legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin said after watching the arguments. "Now I think its even harder to predict the result of this case after hearing this argument."

[Updated at 11:31 a.m. ET] Oral arguments have wrapped up, according to CNN Supreme Court producer Bill Mears. They went just a bit over schedule, lasting about one hour and 20 minutes.


[Updated at 11:23 a.m. ET] While we wait on word from the courthouse, consider this: A new CNN/ORC International Poll indicates that 53% of Americans support same-sex marriage. In the same survey, 57% of respondents said they had a family member or close friend who is gay or lesbian.

Here's a look at the issue, by the numbers.

[Updated at 11:06 a.m. ET] The same-sex marriage debate is a huge issue, and the lawyers inside were penciled in for an hour to make their cases. Doesn't sound like much time, but to be fair, the oral arguments regarding the Affordable Care Act (aka "Obamacare") last March lasted roughly two hours.

Tomorrow's DOMA arguments have been given one hour and 50 minutes. We'll see if they stay on schedule today.

[Updated at 10:46 a.m. ET] If all is going to plan, Jean Podrasky, a lesbian whose first cousin happens to be Chief Justice John Roberts, is inside the court hearing the arguments.

"I know that my cousin is a good man," she wrote in an op-ed this week. "I feel confident that John is wise enough to see that society is becoming more accepting of the humanity of same-sex couples and the simple truth that we deserve to be treated with dignity, respect, and equality under the law."

You might see a lot of red avatars with a “=” equal sign in your Twitter feed today. Supporters of marriage rights for same-sex couples are wearing red today to show their support – both on their persons and their social media accounts. That includes Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley.

FULL POST

Kerry makes unannounced Afghanistan visit
John Kerry, then a U.S. senator, meets with Afghan President Hamid Karzai at the presidential palace in Kabul in October 2009.
March 25th, 2013
08:21 AM ET

Kerry makes unannounced Afghanistan visit

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry made a previously unannounced stop in Afghanistan for a meeting with Afghan President Hamid Karzai on Monday, the day that a U.S.-run prison that bred tension between the nations was handed over to the Afghans.

Kerry landed in Kabul on Monday afternoon and was expected to meet with Karzai at the presidential palace later in the day.

Kerry's visit comes on the day that the United States handed over control of a U.S.-run prison near Bagram Air Base to Afghan authorities. The detention facility was a sticking point between U.S. and Afghan officials.

The visit also comes amid other tensions between Karzai and the NATO-led coalition forces that escalated after a bomb blast in Kabul this month that killed nine people. Karzai said afterward that there are "ongoing daily talks between the Taliban, Americans and foreigners in Europe and in the Gulf states."

FULL STORY
March 21st, 2013
10:25 AM ET

U.N. will probe Syria's chemical weapons claim

The United Nations will probe Syria's claim that rebels may have used chemical weapons in the country, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said Thursday.

Opposition groups, meanwhile, have insisted that the Syrian regime itself used such weapons.

Syria asked for a U.N. investigation of its claim, and Ban said he has a mandate to consider such a request from any member state. So the U.N. probe will focus on the government's allegation.

FULL STORY
Months after shooting, Malala at school
Malala Yousafzai, 15, waves as she is discharged from a hospital in central England earlier this year.
March 19th, 2013
01:47 PM ET

Months after shooting, Malala at school

For the first time since the Taliban shot her five months ago, Pakistani teenager Malala Yousafzai has done what made her a target of the would-be assassins: She's gone to school.

The 15-year-old on Tuesday attended Edgbaston High School in Birmingham, England, the city in which doctors treated her after she received initial care in Pakistan, a public relations agency working with her announced.

FULL STORY
Police: Chicago baby killed with single gunshot
Jonylah Watkins was fatally shot while in her father's minivan in Chicago on March 11, police say.
March 19th, 2013
09:48 AM ET

Police: Chicago baby killed with single gunshot

A Chicago baby who was killed when someone fired on her father's minivan last week was shot once, not multiple times as previously reported, police said Tuesday.

Chicago police spokesman Adam Collins also said the father was not changing 6-month-old Jonylah Watkins' diaper when she was shot as previously reported, but rather that the baby was simply on her father's lap in the vehicle.

And Jonylah's mother wasn't shot in the leg while she was pregnant with Jonylah as some news accounts had said, according to Collins.

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March 18th, 2013
07:36 AM ET

Body, explosive devices found in UCF dorm

A body with a self-inflicted gunshot wound was found along with a bag of explosives in a dormitory room at the University of Central Florida early Monday, prompting officials to cancel classes at the main Orlando campus until at least noon, a school spokesman said.

Police made the discovery shortly after 12:20 a.m., after a fire alarm sounded at the Tower 1 dorm and someone called 911 about a person with a gun there, school spokesman Grant Heston said. Officers entered the dorm and found a male dead of a self-inflicted gunshot wound in a bedroom, Heston said.

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March 15th, 2013
10:50 AM ET

CDC: Man died of rabies from transplant

A Maryland man recently died of rabies that he contracted from a tainted organ he received in a transplant operation more than a year ago, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday.

Health care teams are now giving anti-rabies shots to three other patients who received organs from the same donor as the Maryland man, the CDC said.

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