Thursday's intriguing people
Tim Thomas, 37, says winning the Stanley Cup is "a dream come true."
June 16th, 2011
01:01 PM ET

Thursday's intriguing people

Tim Thomas

The 37-year-old Boston Bruins goal-tender is regarded as a key the component in helping his team achieve last night’s historic Stanley Cup win against the Vancouver Canucks. It has been a long ride for Thomas, who started his first NHL game at 28 and became a regular goalie at 31. At one point, his parents sold their wedding rings to raise money for his hockey career, and a young Tim sold apples door-to-door, according to the Boston Globe.

"Every night, all season long, he always gave us a chance," Bruins coach Claude Julien told the Globe.

The Stanley Cup win is the first for the Bruins in 39 years.

“This is literally a dream come true, just like it is for everyone on this team,’’ Thomas said. “At 37, this might be my only shot to win it.’’


Wednesday's intriguing people
The relaunch of Keith Olbermann’s “Countdown” will premier June 20 on the Al Gore co-founded Current TV cable network.
June 8th, 2011
11:54 AM ET

Wednesday's intriguing people

Keith Olbermann

The former MSNBC anchor has done interviews in anticipation of the relaunch of his news broadcast “Countdown,” which will premier June 20 on the Al Gore co-founded Current TV cable network. The program will broadcast at 8 p.m. ET from Olbermann’s new — and rather Spartan — offices near New York’s Chelsea district.

In an interview with The Hollywood Reporter, Olbermann said MSNBC did not decide until halfway through the now infamous, final January 21 broadcast that the anchor would be cut loose from his contract. His staff found out at that time as well.

On Tuesday, Olbermann told Terry Gross of NPR’s “Fresh Air” that he is an opinion journalist. As a result, he said, it was fine for him to make political contributions to three Democratic candidates in 2010. However, he said, he did not make the donations to support their politics, per se, because he doesn’t even vote.

Instead, the money was meant to help the three officials obtain personal security after they’d faced numerous death threats, Olbermann said. Arizona Rep. Gabrielle Giffords was one of the recipients. In January, she was shot in the head while making an appearance at a grocery store parking lot.


Tuesday's intriguing people
Rep. Anthony Weiner's wife, Huma Abedin, assists Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, right, during congressional testimony.
June 7th, 2011
11:51 AM ET

Tuesday's intriguing people

Huma Abedin

The wife of Rep. Anthony Weiner is a central, and silent, figure since her husband's sexting admission Monday. Many have asked: Will their 11-month-old marriage survive?

The Washington Post column The Reliable Source praised Abedin for not appearing alongside Weiner on Monday as the suffering wife.

Abedin, 34, was born in Michigan, grew up in Saudi Arabia and returned to the United States to attend college, according to the New York Daily News. Her late father, a college professor, was from India and her mother, also a professor, was born in Pakistan.

A headline Tuesday on the ethnic news site New America Media asked, "Will Huma Abedin Remain Weiner's Good South Asian Wife?"

Abedin is a longtime senior aide to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, starting out as an intern to the first lady in 1996, according to a 2007 Vogue magazine profile. Abedin and Weiner met during Clinton's 2008 campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination, the Daily News said.

Not only did Clinton throw Abedin and Weiner an engagement party, but former President Bill Clinton officiated at their wedding. Abedin is Muslim and Weiner is Jewish.

"Abedin has the energy of a woman in her 20s," Clinton said in the Vogue article, "the confidence of a woman in her 30s, the experience of a woman in her 40s and the grace of a woman in her 50s."