Man behind anti-Islam film gets year in prison
Mark Basseley Youssef appeared in a federal courtroom last month.
November 7th, 2012
08:45 PM ET

Man behind anti-Islam film gets year in prison

[Updated at 8:45 p.m. ET] An Egyptian-American man behind the inflammatory film "Innocence of Muslims" on Wednesday was sentenced to one year in federal prison after admitting to violating the terms of his probation from a 2010 bank fraud case.

Mark Basseley Youssef also was ordered to serve four years of supervised release after his prison term. The sentencing by Judge Christina Snyder came in a Los Angeles federal court after a hearing Wednesday in which Youssef admitted using an alias, which prosecutors said violated his probation.

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July 30th, 2012
12:31 PM ET

Colorado theater shooting suspect charged with 142 total counts

[Updated at 12:31 p.m ET] The suspect in Colorado shooting case has been charged 24 counts of first-degree murder.

Holmes was charged twice for each victim who was killed.

Read the full complaint

There are three different classes of murder charges in the state of Colorado. One set of charges is because Holmes is accused of shooting after deliberation, referring to the planning of the attack. The second set of charges is because he is accused of having an attitude of universal malice, manifesting extreme indifference to the value of human life.

Holmes was also charged with 116 counts of attempted murder, one count that is a sentence enhancer because of violence and one count for possession of explosive devices.

Arapahoe County District Attorney Carol Chambers said last Monday that deciding whether to pursue the death penalty would involve input from victims and their relatives. A capital case would require a finding of either extreme indifference or deliberation.

[Updated at 12:17 p.m ET] James Holmes, the man accused of opening fire this month inside an Aurora, Colorado, movie theater, has been officially charged with a total of 142 counts, including first degree murder in relation to the shooting.

[Posted at 11:30 a.m. ET] The man accused of opening fire this month inside an Aurora, Colorado, movie theater will have his second court appearance Monday, when he is to face formal charges.

James Holmes is suspected of killing 12 people and wounding 58 during a Batman film premiere on July 20. He is also being held in connection with the subsequent discovery of his booby-trapped apartment, which authorities think he rigged before the massacre in the Century Aurora 16 multiplex.

Holmes is to be led Monday morning through an underground tunnel that connects the courthouse to the Arapahoe County Jail, where he has been held in isolation without bail.

At his court appearance, which starts at 11:30 a.m. ET, he is expected to face 12 charges of first-degree murder, charges of attempted first-degree murder and charges related to the booby-trapped apartment.

In his initial court appearance last Monday, the 24-year-old former doctoral candidate - his hair dyed various shades of orange - appeared dazed and did not speak.

Arapahoe County District Attorney Carol Chambers said last Monday that deciding whether to pursue the death penalty would involve input from victims and their relatives. A capital case would require a finding of either extreme indifference or deliberation.

Authorities have remained silent about a possible motive in the case.

More on Colorado shooting:

HLN: What's jail like for suspect?

Pastor: Where God was in Aurora

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At 'The Rock,' getting in might be tougher than getting out
Government-run monuments such as Alcatraz Island could close Saturday if a budget agreement isn't reached.
April 8th, 2011
07:50 PM ET

At 'The Rock,' getting in might be tougher than getting out

The difficulty at one of America’s most infamous prisons this weekend might be trying to get on the inside.

Alcatraz Island, in San Francisco Bay, will be closed to visitors if there is a government shutdown because it is run by the National Park Service.

Before it became a popular tourist destination, the federal prison at Alcatraz was home to the likes of criminals such as Al Capone, Robert "Birdman of Alcatraz" Stroud and George "Machine Gun" Kelly.

As of Thursday night, 3,000 people had booked tickets through Alcatraz Cruises, according to the ferry operator that transports people to the prison know as “The Rock.”

National parks could lose $32 million a day

“We typically sell out on the weekend with 5,000 tickets a day at this time of year,” says Denise Rasmussen, director of sales and marketing for Alcatraz Cruises.

“We will be refunding tickets each day that the government is shutdown.”

Rasmussen says that the company is working on an alternative cruise plan around San Francisco Bay beginning Saturday if the prison grounds are shut down.

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Filed under: Budget • California