July 28th, 2010
11:14 PM ET

The day's most popular stories

The five most popular CNN.com stories during the last 24 hours, according to NewsPulse:

Video catches alligator 'feeding frenzy': A voice heard on an amazing video of 300 feeding alligators says it all: "I ain't never seen so many gators in my life."

Judge blocks part of Arizona immigration law: A legal battle over a tough Arizona immigration law appeared certain after a federal judge granted a preliminary injunction Wednesday that blocked the most controversial parts of the law a day before it was to take effect.

NASCAR team owner hurt in plane crash: When NASCAR team owner Jack Roush crashed his plane at an Oshkosh, Wisconsin, airport Tuesday night, the aircraft "cartwheeled" an undetermined number of times and ended up facing the opposite direction, National Transportation Safety Board spokesman Peter Knudson said Wednesday.

Missing teen thought to be with sex offender: A 19-year-old Kentucky woman who has been missing for more than a week is believed to be with a registered sex offender who has a history of kidnapping and unlawful confinement, authorities said.

No survivors in Pakistan plane crash: No one survived the crash of a Pakistani passenger plane that went down in the outskirts of the capital Islamabad Wednesday morning with 152 people on board, officials said.


Filed under: Most Popular
soundoff (3 Responses)
  1. afraidofheights

    If the federal government politicians could resist the urge to act like children and not think exclusively about how their positions will impact the mid-terms and Latino vote in the out years, we would have reasonable legislation at the federal level. We would not have to litigate a state’s immigration policy.

    For another take on the AZ immigration law which is both serious and wicked FUNNY, check out this link:

    http://www.dailygoat.com/?p=754

    July 29, 2010 at 12:03 am | Report abuse |
    • BreakingNewsBlog.us

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      July 29, 2010 at 5:08 am | Report abuse |
  2. Smith in Oregon

    Tonight CNN's AC360 Anderson Cooper went over the story of a US defense contractor (David H. Brooks DHB) wanted for an alleged stock fraud scheme to the tune of 190 Million dollars. It seems David Brooks, CEO of the largest body armor company supplying troops in Iraq and Afghanistan was desperate to obtain memory eraser pills to deploy on a former chief financial officer of his company DHB. Anderson Cooper sarcastially laughed about that. New York times and other western media were quick to post, 'there is no memory-erasing pill'.

    For the scores of men and women in the US Military who have worked in very sensitive programs and emerged years later with total memory erasal of 5 to 10 years of their direct involvement in that program, it is no laughing matter. These career officiers were all top secret or higher cleared, served with honor and integrity, discharged honorably, and yet it definately appears the US Military didn't even trust their most trusted soldiers to maintain their silence and subjected them to drugs which erased their memorys across a large block of time.

    During WW2 German chemists discovered and the SS used during interrogation a well known drug which induced a 3-4 day memory loss. The person emerged totally unable to recall anything that transpired over that 3-4 day period. That was in the 1940's. Apparently American scientists working for the immense US Military complex have greatly expanded upon chemical wipes over long and short term memorys. And this seems unique to America. The US Military Complex it seems does not even trust it's most trusted men and women in service and after service. While a complete 5 to 10 year memory erasal is a remarkable achievement, it is also depraved, immoral and tells the world the US Military complex doesn't even trust it's most trusted and honorable employees.

    In the mid 1980's I personally met one such individual that had worked for space command deep within the Cheynne Mountain complex for over 5 years. It seemed from many discussions he had been given something during the initial orientation meeting prior to his work at his duty station. After leaving Cheynne Mountain and retiring, well over 5 years of memorys had been totally erased immediately following the orientation meeting. His memorys after his tour in Cheynne Mountain were fully intact but all of his skills and memorys obtained during that lengthy tour were totally erased.

    And to the initial story which CNN's AC360 Anderson Cooper was laughing at. What do you think led David Brooks to even consider seeking a memory erasal drug? Undoubtedly as a leading provider for US military body armor, he had been repeatedly visited by Military brass and at least one had mentioned memory erasers had been imployed by the US Military in select programs and projects on retiring staff members. To those that the US Military has done that to, it is no laughing manner.

    July 29, 2010 at 3:51 am | Report abuse |