August 24th, 2010
11:56 AM ET

S. Korea promises immediate response to N. Korea artillery

The South Korean dock landing ship Dokdo participates in anti-submarine drills in early August.

Any further North Korean artillery strikes south of the maritime boundary between North and South Korea will be met with shelling from the South, the South’s defense minister said Tuesday.

On August 9, North Korea fired more than 100 artillery rounds toward the Northern Limit Line, the sea border between the two Koreas set after the Korean War. Ten of those rounds fell south of the line, according to news reports from South Korea. At that time, the South did not return fire but sent warning messages through military channels to the North.

“Under the previous rules of engagement (near the NLL), we’re supposed to send warnings through hotlines and not return fire unless the North fires additional shots,” Defense Minister Kim Tae-young told a parliamentary committee on Tuesday, according to a report from The Korea Times.

New rules call for an immediate military response, but still require the North to be warned that the South Korean shelling is coming.

"If North Korea fires artillery rounds south of the NLL, we will respond by firing toward north of the NLL," the Yonhap news agency quoted Kim as saying.

Tension between the Korean Peninsula neighbors has been heightened since the sinking of a South Korean warship, the Cheonan, in March.

South Korea and an international inquiry found a torpedo fired by a North Korea submarine responsible for the sinking, in which 46 South Korean sailors died. The North has denied any role in the loss of the Cheonan.

South Korea has since staged military exercises - including anti-submarine drills with U.S. forces - which the North has called a provocation. It was shortly after South Korean naval maneuvers concluded on August 9 that the North fired its artillery barrage.

Last Friday, the U.S. military said it will conduct new anti-submarine exercises with South Korea next month.

Post by:
Filed under: North Korea • South Korea
soundoff (76 Responses)
  1. Christopher

    South Korea–United States relations have been most extensive since 1948, when the United States helped establish capitalism in South Korea and fought on its UN-sponsored side in the Korean War (1950–1953). During the subsequent four decades, South Korea experienced tremendous economic, political and military growth, and significantly reduced US dependency. From Roh Tae-woo's administration to Roh Moo Hyun's administration, South Korea sought to establish an American partnership, which has made the Seoul-Washington relationship subject to some strains. However, relations between the United States and South Korea have greatly strengthened under the Lee Myung-bak administration. At the 2009 G-20 London summit, U.S. President Barack Obama called South Korea "one of America's closest allies and greatest friends." [1]

    The South Korea and United States agreed military alliance in 1953.[6] They called as "the relationship forged in blood". [7] In addition, roughly 50,000 United States Forces, Korea troops are stationed in South Korea. In 2009, The South Korea and United States pledged to develop the alliance’s vision for future defense cooperation.[8]

    August 24, 2010 at 4:07 pm | Report abuse |
  2. Christopher

    South Korea–United States relations have been most extensive since 1948, when the United States helped establish capitalism in South Korea and fought on its UN-sponsored side in the Korean War (1950–1953). During the subsequent four decades, South Korea experienced tremendous economic, political and military growth, and significantly reduced US dependency. From Roh Tae-woo's administration to Roh Moo Hyun's administration, South Korea sought to establish an American partnership, which has made the Seoul-Washington relationship subject to some strains. However, relations between the United States and South Korea have greatly strengthened under the Lee Myung-bak administration. At the 2009 G-20 London summit, U.S. President Barack Obama called South Korea "one of America's closest allies and greatest friends." [1]

    The South Korea and United States agreed military alliance in 1953.[6] They called as "the relationship forged in blood". [7] In addition, roughly 50,000 United States Forces, Korea troops are stationed in South Korea. In 2009, The South Korea and United States pledged to develop the alliance’s vision for future defense cooperation.[8]

    August 24, 2010 at 4:10 pm | Report abuse |
  3. SR

    US just blustering. For all the big noises it made about showing off its military might, the US steered well clear of the Yellow sea in the recent exercises.

    August 24, 2010 at 4:13 pm | Report abuse |
  4. Tom

    The reason you have a N Korea today is because Truman wouldn't allow Macarthur to do his job. Partial war only creates future problems while total war guarrantees victory(just like we did in WW2).

    August 24, 2010 at 4:31 pm | Report abuse |
    • NIck

      No, the reason we have a North and South Korea is the opposite. The war was won but despite warnings from the Chinese to not advance on the Yalu (the border between Korea and China) MacArthur pushed anyway. This blunder is why the North continues to exist.

      August 24, 2010 at 4:56 pm | Report abuse |
    • Tom2

      do u know what mccarthur wanted to do he wanted the us to attack china will nuclear weapons which could have caused world war 3 ok i know us history

      August 24, 2010 at 6:29 pm | Report abuse |
    • JD

      If Truman would have let Macarthur take the war to the China, who instigated the war and supported North Korea, then we wouldn't have a North Korean or a Chinese problem today. No WWIII either, this was well before Russian nukes or ICBM's made that a possibility. The Russians would have just complained at the UN and thanked us in private. Too bad,

      August 24, 2010 at 7:38 pm | Report abuse |
  5. Jbone

    Hmm...so the North is firing rounds into the water south of the NLL. So the South's response will be to fire rounds into the water north of the NLL.

    So basically, the Koreas hate water?

    August 24, 2010 at 4:53 pm | Report abuse |
    • Michele Gomis

      well put! wish I'd thought of that!

      August 24, 2010 at 9:14 pm | Report abuse |
  6. Dem

    All of you who are all saying this isn't a U.S. problem need to stop being so selfish. South Korea is an ally. If somebody attacked the U.S. do you think our allies would just let it happen?

    August 24, 2010 at 5:18 pm | Report abuse |
  7. trakTRUK

    why usa have to be putting his nose in every other country problem?? well i know usa is a troublemaker and is not the ppl who lives in usa is the ppl who is in control of the country and when usa get in troubles who is the one who goes to war in the first line ?? yes the ppl so... why americans have to put up with all this crapy desitions of the gobernament and why not the troublemakers go and fight for it

    August 24, 2010 at 5:32 pm | Report abuse |
  8. Excalibre2010

    Good stuff, folks! Nice to see mostly intelligent debate on a critical issue like this. I think it's altogether appropriate that the US continue to honor it's treaty commitments to South Korea. Indeed, ours IS a "relationship forged in blood". Our obligation, however, extends beyond the Koreas. We have an obligation to the planet to prevent, even if preemptively, the use and/or distribution of atomic weapons. This imperative cannot be ignored. We do so at own profound peril. And BTW...joint military exercises,(illustrating in very real time that NATO and SEATO forces, (CONVENTIONAL forces), can be easily mobilized and effectively utilized), is the perfect way to remind the North that unless they want nuclear annihilation for their own people and nation, they MUST play by the rules. And, but for their 50 year history of vainglorious posturing, they haven't done much; except build atomic weapons on the backs of their starving people.
    They may have a legitimate defensive nuclear deterrence, but no one was gonna nuke em in the first place. We can beat em conventionally. Now they must be very closely watched; and maybe pre-empted. In the meantime, we're doing everything we can do; and mostly, we're doing it right. Mister Obama is quite right in honoring our Band of Brothers: The South Korean Nation.

    August 24, 2010 at 5:57 pm | Report abuse |
  9. Fred

    Who the hell makes these stupid rules up?!?!?! Point gun, pull trigger. End of story.

    August 24, 2010 at 6:28 pm | Report abuse |
  10. Tom2

    and u know what the usa gets into other countries busineesses because we mostly own the world ok and if someone invaded the usa whose gonna stop the invasion by ground fighting the USA did the british send their navy to protect ny from preventing another terroist attack on 9 11 i don't think so

    August 24, 2010 at 6:33 pm | Report abuse |
  11. virgo

    All these things are happening because most of the US enemies perceive a weak political leadership in Washington. This is what we get from a foreign policy which concentrates on apologizing for purported past American abuses in its foreign policy. With its unique role in world affairs, the US finds itself wedged in very hard choices, isolationism or active participation in world affairs. Isolationism is not an option for us, hence active participation offers a more viable option. If we are to be an effective, influential and credible party in world affairs, our politicians, without an eye for the next election, should ensure that our enemies do not mistake our good intentions for weakness.

    August 24, 2010 at 6:49 pm | Report abuse |
    • DKJ

      Well said Virgo. It seems these days that is all the politians are interested in, the next election, so all we hear & see from Washington DC is BS. As a society we have lost our ways and the characteristics which made us strong, honor, loyality, self-respect and integrity.

      August 24, 2010 at 10:36 pm | Report abuse |
  12. Eurotrash

    If North-Korea attacked the South and things would escalate, China would immediately get in touch with the US, informing them they're rolling into North-Korea to stabilize the situation and nip WW3 in the bud.

    August 24, 2010 at 7:06 pm | Report abuse |
  13. Bill4

    Hey 2 cents,

    Love your style.

    August 24, 2010 at 11:37 pm | Report abuse |
  14. Aric

    Wait, N. Korea is shelling its own waters with a few rounds going into the S. Korean side? Is this really a big deal? Let them shoot at the sea all they want, as long as there are no ships near by!

    August 25, 2010 at 12:14 am | Report abuse |
  15. texan

    I feel so bad for those with the misfortune of having been born in N. Korea. Kim J. needs to go.. He doesn't care for his people.

    August 25, 2010 at 1:06 am | Report abuse |
1 2 3