September 19th, 2010
10:56 AM ET

Tackling controversy over footballers' deaths

Owen Thomas, a University of Pennsylvania junior, committed suicide in April.

 At least two high school football players have died on the field this month, while an autopsy on a college player who committed suicide revealed a type of brain damage typically seen in retired or aging athletes.

On Friday, a 17-year-old starting quarterback in at West Orange-Stark High School in Orange, Texas, collapsed on the sideline after throwing a touchdown pass. Reggie Garrett was considered to have much potential for college ball and had an offer to play for Iowa State and interest from other Division I schools, a local coach told the Houston Chronicle.

Earlier this month, a football player with Wekiva High School in Apopka, Florida, collapsed on the field during practice and died after being taken to a hospital, the Orlando Sentinel reports. Ninth-grader Olivier Louis was 15. The paper says a memorial service is planned for September 25. Autopsy results are expected soon.

A newly released autopsy on a University of Pennsylvania football player who committed suicide in April revealed he had chronic traumatic encephalopathy, which can cause poor decision-making, impaired memory, erratic behavior, depression and suicide. Read CNN.com's FULL STORY on Owen Thomas.

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  1. Floria sigmundi

    Ive watched these kids play in the heat of southern California I think it horrid what they go through, I am sweatting and very uncomfortable in the heat just sitting under a shaded tent. These kids have bulky uniforms on. The helmet is the worst its padded and insulates heave which Causes the brain to shut the body down.

    Check out this video on YouTube:

    [youtube=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fUJ4bL6O3uw&w=640&h=360]

    September 19, 2010 at 1:52 pm | Report abuse |
  2. Sarah

    PLEASE DONATE FOR PAKISTAN EMERGENCY DONATION & DOUBLE IT FROM CANADIAN GOVERNMENT BY Oct 3rd.
    CALL UNICEF CANADA 1-800-567-4483 OR UNICEF.CA
    $1, $2 OR MORE, EVERY $ COUNTS. THANKS IN THE NAME OF HUMANITY.

    September 19, 2010 at 4:30 pm | Report abuse |