On the Radar: Cairo's turn to violence, U.S.'s historic storm, Australia's cyclone
Pro- and anti-Mubarak demonstrators attack each other in Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, on Wednesday.
February 2nd, 2011
10:19 AM ET

On the Radar: Cairo's turn to violence, U.S.'s historic storm, Australia's cyclone

Vicious clashes in Egypt - Chaos overtook Tahrir Square in Cairo, which had been peaceful for days as throngs of demonstrators called for the immediate removal of President Hosni Mubarak. This Just In has been keeping track of developments as they happen.  On Wednesday, demonstrators threw rocks and charged each other on camels. Several CNN reporters in Cairo said they could hear gunfire coming from the unruly crowd, which appears to be divided between people who support Mubarak and those who want him gone.

The tide changed shortly after Mubarak announced that he would not seek re-election in September but was going to remain in office. CNN's Ivan Watson tweeted that in Tahrir Square, people are digging up stones to use as weapons. Anderson Cooper and a camera crew were attacked and beaten as they tried to make their way through the crowd, and Hala Gorani was caught in the middle of charging camels. Protesters have been hurling rocks, shoes and pieces of metal and beating each other. The police were nowhere to be seen and the Army seemed to be doing little.  Are you in Egypt? Send an iReport.

Historic snowstorm - A blizzard is hammering the Midwestern United States. Chicago shut down its school system for the first time in 12 years and Milwaukee was getting constant snowfall. But the state getting the most snow - at least as of Wednesday morning - was Missouri, which was sacked by 18.3 inches. People across a huge swath of the country are being told to stay at home and not to attempt to travel. Thousands of flights are canceled. Boston's Logan International Airport was closed so runways could be de-iced. The icy weather is making it difficult for Super Bowl fans to get to Texas. Stay tuned to CNN Travel on Twitter for the latest.

Australia cyclone - A tropical cyclone with winds stronger than 140 mph is charging Australia's northeastern coast, which has already been battered by disastrous flooding this year. Cyclone Yasi made landfall Wednesday. The Sydney Morning Herald reported that Townsville in Queensland was ripped apart. More than 30 homes were severely damaged and more than 90,000 people in the town of Mission Beach were without power, according to the Herald.

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soundoff (16 Responses)
  1. Philip

    These riots in Egypt remind me of the 1992 Rodney King riots in the Los Angeles area. (for those of you who do not know, Rodney King was a man who suffered an horrible beating by LA police, and the whole affair was caught on video) Fter the video was released, people began taking to the strrets in protest of the obvious display of police brutality. The protests turned into exteme violence in short order. Some 28 buildings were set on fire. Stores were being looted everywhere. By the time the smoke cleared, there were 53 people dead. (and God only knows how many suffered debilitating injuries) As night fell, with the police overwhlmed, the National Guard was called upon...even as far south as Huntington Beach, miles from where the riots originated. This famous incident, as well as what we see in Egypt, underscores how taking to the streets is NOT the answer. A peaceful protest can quickly become violent, and as the police become overwhelmed, greedy selfish people take the opportunity to rob and loot.(cont)

    February 2, 2011 at 11:50 am | Report abuse |
  2. HELP

    Please this is a HUMAN call for all of us! anyone who knows how to contact Reporters from CNN, Alarabiya, Aljazeera, BBC Arabic, France 24 arabic::::: TELL them to tell the youths of EGYPT who are being trapped to PLAN an EXIT quickly before they MASSACRE them and to PRETEND they are with these thugs and run out of Tahrir Sq. and re-organize their efforts another day but HE WILL KILL THEM THAT IS NOT HUMANE WE MUST ((((((ALL)))) HELP THEM

    February 2, 2011 at 11:51 am | Report abuse |
  3. Nesli

    Where do men on horseback and camels come from? The desert! Obviously these people are villagers who have been paid by the government to cause unrest. And the fact that the army tanks are not intervening is clear indication that Mubarak wants to cause mayhem. And he would be happy with a civil war? Is this how someone behaves who loves his country and wants to die there? Wow.

    February 2, 2011 at 11:58 am | Report abuse |
    • maria shapiro

      If you have ever been to Egypt, you would know that camels are widely used by the security police, just as horses are used in other countries. These camels are trained in police action, to disperse unruly crowds or simply to keep merchants and beggars from harrassing tourists at historical sites. I don't believe, therefore, that some villagers simply jumped on their camels – used for work in the farm – and ran them into the protesters to show their support for Mubarak. Too professional. These are obviously police disguised as civilians, instructed to create chaos and violence, so that Mubark can impose martial law and put an end to the protest. I pray with all my heart that he fails miserably.

      February 2, 2011 at 5:32 pm | Report abuse |
  4. Philip

    ...protests over governmental abuses can become abusive themselves. 53 people were killed during the King incident. The violence displayed while protesting governmental abuse amounts to the pot calling the kettle black. Violence is not the answer. It is the problem. We should all avoid getting involved in protests where mob-mentality can overpower our well thought out and valid protests in the blink of an eye. If you love yourself and your families more than you love the government, you would avoid risking your life just to "speak out", would you not?

    February 2, 2011 at 11:59 am | Report abuse |
    • Jim Brieske

      Philip. It's sad Mubarek refuses to leave Egypt immediately. He rather cause the deaths of his people. He should leave tomorrow because the violence appears to be escalating and his supporters are creating a civil war-like atmosphere.
      If he doesn't leave it proves he doesn't love Egypt or her people. It validates everything his nonsupporters have been saying.
      Mainly, he is just a common thief.
      jim

      February 2, 2011 at 3:04 pm | Report abuse |
  5. HELP

    Please this is a HUMAN call for all of us! anyone who knows how to contact Reporters from CNN, Alarabiya, Aljazeera, BBC Arabic, France 24 arabic::::: TELL them to tell the youths of EGYPT who are being trapped to PLAN an EXIT quickly before they MASSACRE them and to PRETEND they are with these thugs and run out of Tahrir Sq. and re-organize their efforts another day but HE WILL KILL THEM THAT IS NOT HUMANE WE MUST ((((((ALL)))) HELPppppppp

    February 2, 2011 at 12:15 pm | Report abuse |
  6. Philip

    When our own child does not get his way and throws a temper-tantrum, do we not discipline that child and send him to his room until he has cooled down. Do we expect our governments, who are tasked with looking out for us, to behave any differently than we do ourselves? Taking to the streets will not get you want you want, you little brat.

    February 2, 2011 at 12:28 pm | Report abuse |
  7. bayan

    The people of Egypt know that those, whom CNN calls pro mubarak protesters, are Central Security forces together with Government hired thugs. Please report the TRUTH, cnn.

    February 2, 2011 at 1:06 pm | Report abuse |
  8. bayan

    The White House spokesman just said that the US has evidence that someone who works for Mobarak ordered those so called pro mobarak demonstrators.

    February 2, 2011 at 1:50 pm | Report abuse |
  9. zack

    i i say we let them decide for themselves – we should not be in there business if they go to war over it its there country we have our own problems to deal with

    February 2, 2011 at 6:29 pm | Report abuse |
  10. omar

    they are not Egyptians but they are people who want to destabilize the security and stability of a country does not know the mass does not know the violence does not know the corruption does not know the vandalism did not know sedition
    Egypt is a country of security and prosperity, freedom and development and tolerance they are minority and they not represented Egypt and the Egyptians but they are some law breakers

    February 2, 2011 at 8:38 pm | Report abuse |
  11. Veritas

    Let them solve their own problems. we have enough of our own. mubarek needs to leave and then things will settle down.

    February 2, 2011 at 11:11 pm | Report abuse |
  12. Person

    Israel is becoming a nation. http://nopolicestate.blogspot.com/2011/01/egypt_29.html

    February 3, 2011 at 9:37 am | Report abuse |
  13. jose moreno

    verry sad events

    February 4, 2011 at 12:34 pm | Report abuse |
  14. jose moreno

    only people that are in the midle of this events know what it feelds like to be stept on for years and years.......

    February 4, 2011 at 12:40 pm | Report abuse |