Japan begins road to recovery
March 13th, 2011
11:43 PM ET

Japan quake live blog: Explosion at nuclear plant's reactor building

An 8.9-magnitude earthquake hit northern Japan early Friday, triggering tsunamis that caused widespread devastation and crippled a nuclear power plant. Are you in an affected area? Send an iReport. Read the full report on the quake, tsunami and the fears surrounding Japan's damaged nuclear reactors.

[11:43 p.m. ET Sunday, 12:43 p.m. Monday in Tokyo] Six people were injured after Monday morning's explosion at the building housing the No. 3 reactor at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in northeastern Japan, Tokyo Electric Power Co. says. Seven people earlier reported as missing have been accounted for, a company official told reporters.

Japanese public broadcaster NHK showed images of white smoke rising above the facility. Citing the nation's nuclear and industrial agency, NHK said that a wall of one of the reactor's buildings had collapsed.

Japan's chief cabinet secretary said a day earlier that accumulating hydrogen gas "may potentially cause an explosion" in the building housing the No. 3 reactor at the Daiichi plant. A similar scenario played out Saturday, when a blast caused by hydrogen buildup blew the roof off a concrete building housing the plant's No. 1 reactor.

[11:33 p.m. ET Sunday, 12:33 p.m. Monday in Tokyo] The official death toll from the earthquake and the tsunami has risen to 1,627, authorities said Monday. This doesn't count the 2,000 bodies that the Kyodo news agency reported were found Monday in Miyagi Prefecture on Japan's east coast.

As of 10 a.m., at least 1,720 people were missing and 1,962 injured, according to the National Police Agency Emergency Disaster Headquarters. The number of dead is expected to go up as rescuers reach more hard-hit areas.

[10:59 p.m. ET, 11:59 a.m. Tokyo] An explosion happened late Monday morning at the Fukushima Daiichi's No. 3 nuclear reactor building, Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano confirmed to reporters.

The container vessel surrounding the reactor remains intact, Edano said, citing the head of the nuclear plant report.

Japanese public broadcaster NHK showed images of white smoke rising above the facility, which is in northeastern Japan. Citing the nation's nuclear and industrial agency, NHK said that a wall of one of the reactor's buildings had collapsed.

Residents remaining within 20 kilometers of the plant, despite an earlier evacuation order, have been ordered to stay indoors, according to Edano.  The secretary added that initial reports suggested that radiation levels had increased after the blast, but Edano said he did not believe there was a massive leak, given that water continues to be injected into the reactors and that the pressure inside the reactor is "within a certain range."

Edano said a day earlier that accumulating hydrogen gas "may potentially cause an explosion" in the building housing the No. 3 reactor at the Daiichi plant. A similar scenario played out Saturday, when a blast caused by hydrogen buildup blew the roof off a concrete building housing the plant's No. 1 reactor.

[10:38 p.m. ET, 11:38 a.m. Tokyo] Approximately 2,000 bodies were found Monday in Miyagi Prefecture on Japan's east coast, the Kyodo news agency reported.

[10:31 p.m. ET, 11:31 a.m. Tokyo] Japan's nuclear safety and industrial agency reported sounds of an explosion at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant's No. 3 reactor, according to Japanese public broadcaster NHK.

White smoke could be seen rising from the facility at 11 a.m. Monday.

Workers have been flooding this reactor and the plant's No. 1 reactor with seawater to cool them after the earthquake and tsunami damaged the reactors' cooling systems.

Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano said a day earlier that accumulating hydrogen gas "may potentially cause an explosion" in the building housing the No. 3 reactor at the Daiichi plant. A similar scenario played out Saturday, when a blast caused by hydrogen buildup blew the roof off a concrete building housing the plant's No. 1 reactor. The reactor and its containment system were not damaged in the explosion at the No. 1 reactor.

[9:39 p.m. ET, 10:39 a.m. Tokyo] The death toll from the earthquake and tsunami has risen to 1,598, with hundreds more missing, authorities say. At least 1,720 people were missing and 1,923 injured, according to the National Police Agency Emergency Disaster Headquarters. The number of dead is expected to go up as rescuers reach more hard-hit areas.

[9:29 p.m. ET, 10:29 a.m. Tokyo] An aftershock with a magnitude of 5.8 was recorded 27 minutes ago off Japan's east coast, about 140 kilometers northeast of Tokyo, the U.S. Geological Survey reports.

[9:09 p.m. ET, 10:09 a.m. Tokyo] Japan's NHK television network shows the rescue of three senior citizens who had been trapped in a tsunami-swept car for 20 hours.

[8:57 p.m. ET, 9:57 a.m. Tokyo] More information about the 60-year-old Japanese man who was rescued at sea Sunday after he was spotted clinging to the swept-away remains of his house: "I thought today was the last day of my life," Hiromitsu Shinkawa told his rescuers, according to Kyodo News Agency.

[8:51 p.m. ET, 9:51 a.m. Tokyo] The leading Japanese stock index skidded nearly 5% in the opening minutes Monday, the first full day of trading in Tokyo following last week's earthquake.

The Tokyo Stock Exchange opened as usual at 9 a.m. Japan time. The Nikkei-225 index tumbled 493 points, or 4.8%, to just above 9,700, according to the Nikkei website. It was down even further, almost 600 points, in the first few minutes before rebounding.

[8:32 p.m. ET, 9:32 a.m. Tokyo] In the following video, a victim of the tsunami - rescued by the Japanese military - says water swept her out of her home, and that she clung to a tree and then a mat before she was helped.

[7:50 p.m. ET, 8:50 a.m. Tokyo] About 2.5 million households - just over 4% of the total in Japan - were without electricity Sunday, said Ichiro Fujisaki, the nation's ambassador to the United States. Rolling blackouts are expected in some areas to preserve electricity.

[6:35 p.m. ET, 7:35 a.m. Tokyo] The International Atomic Energy Agency says that - based on information the agency received from officials in Japan - investigators determined that radiation levels have returned to "normal" at one of the power plants previously flagged for concern.

The agency said that authorities have concluded that there were "no emissions of radioactivity" from the three reactors at the Onagawa nuclear plant.

"The current assumption of the Japanese authorities is that the increased level may have been due to a release of radioactive material from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant" located 135 kilometers (about 85 miles) north of Onagawa, the IAEA said.

Japanese officials still are concerned about the Fukushima Daiichi plant, where workers are flooding two reactors with seawater to keep them cool.

[5:34 p.m. ET, 6:34 a.m. Tokyo] While the full extent of the disaster's aftermath is not yet clear, the earthquake and tsunami that devastated parts of Japan could be the most expensive quake in history, CNNMoney reports. Losses from the quake, tsunami and fires will total at least $100 billion, including $20 billion in damage to residences and $40 billion in damage to infrastructure such as roads, rail and port facilities, catastrophe modeling firm Eqecat estimated.

[4:56 p.m. ET, 5:56 a.m. Tokyo] Japanese officials said Sunday they will backstop the country's financial system when markets reopen after Friday's devastating earthquake and tsunami, CNNMoney's Chris Isidore reports.

The Bank of Japan, in a statement, said it would monitor financial markets and the operation of banks and "stand ready to respond and act as necessary." The aim is to make sure the banks have enough cash on hand to meet demands of panicky investors and cover withdrawal demands of bank customers.

Friday afternoon's earthquake hit just before the close of trading in Japanese markets. The benchmark Nikkei 225 stock index dropped just over 100 points, or 1%, in the final minutes of trading and ended the day 1.7% lower.

[3:58 p.m. ET, 4:58 a.m. Tokyo] Japan's Kyodo News Agency has reported a dramatic rescue took place off Japan's coast Sunday, when a Japanese destroyer rescued a 60-year-old man at sea, some 15 kilometers (9 miles) off Fukushima prefecture.

The man, identified as Hiromitsu Shinkawa of Minami Soma, was swept away with his house during Friday's tsunami, Kyodo reported. He was spotted floating in the sea, waving a self-made red flag while standing on a piece of his house's roof. Shinkawa was quoted as telling rescuers he had left his home because of the quake, but returned home to grab some belongings with his wife when the tsunami hit. "I was saved by holding onto the roof," he said, "but my wife was swept away

[3:13 p.m. ET, 4:13 a.m. Tokyo] Japanese media report 42 people were rescued Sunday in Minami Sanriku, a northeastern Japanese town where an estimated 9,500 people - more than half the town's 18,000 population - are unaccounted for.

[2:16 p.m. ET, 3:16 a.m. Tokyo] Delta Airlines resumed its full flight schedule to Japan on Sunday.

[1:54 p.m. ET, 2:54 a.m. Tokyo] Numerous U.S. rescue and assistance teams arrived Sunday in Japan and are helping lead a broad international effort to bring relief to areas ravaged by Friday's earthquake and tsunami.

The United States, the United Kingdom, China, and South Korea are among 69 governments that have offered to help, Kyodo News Agency reported, citing the Japanese foreign ministry.

Aid groups such as the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies have sent teams to some of the worst-hit areas, including Sendai, Narita, Asahi and Tokyo. Mercy Corps International teamed with Peace Winds Japan to rush aid to affected regions.

[12:36 p.m. ET, 1:36 a.m. Tokyo] The death toll from the earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan late last week rose to 1,597, with hundreds more missing, authorities said early Monday.

As of 12:01 a.m. (11:01 a.m. ET), at least 1,481 people were missing and 1,923 injured, according to the National Police Agency Emergency Disaster Headquarters.

The number of dead is expected to go up as rescuers reach more hard-hit areas.

[11:00 a.m. ET, 12:00 a.m. Tokyo] The death toll from the earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan on Friday rose to 1,353, with hundreds more missing, authorities said Sunday.

As of 9:30 p.m. (8:30 a.m. ET), at least 1,085 people were missing and 1,743 injured, according to the National Police Agency Emergency Disaster Headquarters.

[10:39 a.m. ET, 11:39 p.m. Tokyo] A state of emergency has been declared at a nuclear power plant in Onagawa, Japan, where excessive radiation levels have been recorded following Friday's massive earthquake, the United Nations' atomic watchdog agency said Sunday.

Authorities have told the agency that the three reactor units at the Onagawa plant "are under control."

[10:21 a.m. ET, 11:21 p.m. Tokyo] As international aid began to flow into Japan on Sunday, China's Red Cross said it would donate around $152,000 dollars in emergency aid to its Japanese counterpart, China's official Xinhua News Agency reported.

[9:48 a.m. ET, 10:48 p.m. Tokyo] South Korea planned to send a 102-member rescue team to Japan on Sunday, South Korea's Yonhap news agency reported.

South Korea has also arranged for shipments of liquified natural gas to be sent to Japan, the agency said.

[9:10 a.m. ET, 10:10 p.m. Tokyo] Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan called on his country Sunday to prepare for sacrifice and to work together in overcoming the effects of the devastating earthquake and tsunami.

"We Japanese had a lot of difficulties in the past, but we were able to overcome those difficulties to reach this peaceful and prosperous society we have been able to build. So with regard to the earthquake and tsunami, I am confident that the Japanese people can be united to work together. ...  I ask each one of you, please have such determination, and deepen your bond with your family members, your neighbors, and the people in your community to overcome this crisis so that Japan can be a better place. We can do it together."

[8:07 a.m. ET, 9:07 p.m. Tokyo] The death toll from the earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan on Friday rose to 1,217, with hundreds more missing, authorities said Sunday.

As of 7:30 p.m. (6:30 a.m. ET), at least 1,086 people were missing and 1,741 injured, according to the National Police Agency Emergency Disaster Headquarters.

The number of dead is expected to go up as rescuers reach more hard-hit areas.

[7:57 a.m. ET, 8:57 p.m. Tokyo] Some 12,000 people have been rescued from the ruins of Friday's massive earthquake in Japan, Prime Minister Naoto Kan said late Sunday.

[7:30 a.m. ET, 8:30 p.m. Tokyo] The USS Ronald Reagan has started delivering aid in the coastal regions of Japan's Miyagi prefecture. Crew members, in conjunction with the Japan Maritime Self Defense Forces, have conducted 20 sorties delivering aid pallets using eight U.S. and Japanese helicopters, according to Sgt. Maj. Stephen Valley of U.S. Forces Japan.

The Kyodo news agency reported that the team hopes to deliver 30,000 portions of emergency food rations in this initial operation.

[7:08 a.m. ET, 8:08 p.m. Tokyo] Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan has ordered a Tokyo power company to conduct a widespread power outage in an effort to preserve energy as workers try to repair power plants damaged in Friday's devastating earthquake.

[6:45 a.m. ET, 7:45 p.m. Tokyo] There is a 70% likelihood that Japan will experience an earthquake of 7.0 or above in the next three days, the country's meteorological agency said.

Takashi Yokota, director the Earthquake Prediction Information Division of the agency said he based his prediction on increased tectonic activity.

[5:37 a.m. ET, 6:37 p.m. Tokyo] Japan Meteorological Agency has canceled all tsunami advisories. Meanwhile, the death toll from the quake rose on Sunday to 977 dead. At least 739 people are missing and 1,683 are injured, according to the National Police Agency Emergency Disaster Headquarters.

[4:47 a.m. ET, 5:47 p.m. Tokyo] A round of sirens urged people to go to higher ground in Sendai, a city affected days earlier by a tsunami. The tsunami advisories by local officials were prompted by aftershocks following an 8.9-magnitude earthquake that struck last week.

[3:46 a.m. ET, 4:46 p.m. Tokyo] A second explosion could occur at an earthquake-struck nuclear plant in northeastern Japan, a government official told reporters Sunday. Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano said an explosion could occur in the buliding housing the No. 3 reactor at the Fukushima Daiichi plant.

[3:12 a.m. ET, 4:12 p.m. Tokyo] At least 160 people are being tested for radiation exposure after tens of thousands of residents were evacuated in the wake of an explosion at a nuclear reactor damaged by Friday's massive quake and tsunami. FULL STORY

[1:55 a.m. ET, 3:55 p.m. Tokyo] According to Japan's Kyodo News, the magnitude of the devastating quake was revised upward on Sunday from 8.8 to 9.0, making it one of the largest in history, the Japan Meteorological Agency said.

[12:21 a.m. ET, 2:21 p.m. Tokyo]The death toll from the earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan late last week rose to 801, with hundreds more missing, authorities said Sunday. At least 733 are missing, according to the National Police Agency Emergency Disaster Headquarters. The number of dead is expected to go up as rescuers reach more hard-hit areas.

[12:21 a.m. ET, 2:21 p.m. Tokyo] Sgt. Major Stephen Valley, spokesman for U.S.  Forces on Japan, tells CNN that the aircraft carrier Ronald Reagan has arrived off the waters of northern Honshu and is operational, preparing for relief efforts.

soundoff (231 Responses)
  1. Timo Aittola

    Following up on "John's" comment above, I just saw CNN's expert's Bill Nye's commentary. He speaks about a steam cloud and its ability to carry nuclear contaminants. He emphasizes that this is critical as here is "a steam turbine".

    I suggest CNN quickly posts a schematic drawing of the power plant system to remove the wrong impression Nye has given, that the water heated by the reactor would be the same water (in steam form) which goes to the "steam turbine" (to spin the turbine which spins the generator, which generates the electricity.

    March 13, 2011 at 8:36 am | Report abuse |
    • Bill from Rotonda Florida

      Imo, you are absolutley right. Read my post near this one. These so called experts are saying things that doesn't quiet add up. And yes, the water that circulates close to the core is not the same water that is used to move the turbine. To those experts, hey guys, this is high school math. Get your act together and speak like you know what you are talking about.

      March 13, 2011 at 10:20 am | Report abuse |
    • domiro

      Yes guys, their "experts" are anybody who has spare time and wants to get their face in front of a camera. There is no requirement whatsoever for them to know ANYTHING about the subject, only they have to be willing to embarrass themselves on national TV. The media does not care if they are right, as long as people tune in, they get higher ratings. Truth, accuracy and common sense do not get you ratings, so they are willing to say anything regardless of how embarrassed they should be about it. We see this with EVERY major event. Real experts would not have the time to go to CNN studios, get dressed and makeup put on for the cameras and give interviews. REAL experts would be busy finding solutions or offering assistance, or making sure their own reactors are ready for a disaster.

      The other side of the coin is that our educational system has deteriorated to such abysmal depths that the vast majority of people believe anything the media says. Most people don't even know what Bill means in his post about conservation of energy, they probably think it means buying a car with better gas mileage.

      March 13, 2011 at 5:29 pm | Report abuse |
  2. wcan2

    Once again frustrating watching(no ignoring) CNN which is a television hence video channel yet all the coverage is covered with text. Give us back our screens. Show us the full videos on the full screen. We all have large LCD screens to see video and CNN only show video on 50%. Come on CNN lift your game.

    March 13, 2011 at 8:39 am | Report abuse |
  3. Timo Aittola

    To Fred Madden: The cooling ponds located outside of the nuclear power plant reactor and turbine/generator buildings are not used to store fuel rods used in the power plant. Those ponds are there to cool the non-critical water after it in steam form has passed the turbine (spun the turbine which spins the generator to generate electricity). This water never touches anything which is in contact with the nuclear reaction and never goes into the reactor building. This water is heated by using a heath exchanger between the two separate water circuits.

    Cooling of this water is necessary before it is fed back to be made to steam again, as its temperature (and pressure) needs to be increased in a gradual and controlled fashion before it reaches/is fed back to the steam turbine.

    You will observe similar cooling ponds or cooling towers also in non-nuclear power plants.

    March 13, 2011 at 8:56 am | Report abuse |
  4. KT

    I'm afraid they're downplaying the magnitude of the potential for meltdown and mass radiation release. What if another big quake happens like they're predicting? I think of the near disaster at Three Mile Island. The reports given to the public versus what was really happening weren't even close. I understand keeping down mass panic and hysteria, but I hope it's not like 3 mile island where everyone told it was contained and the incident was over when in reality they were still scrambling like crazy to fix the problem. Scary.

    March 13, 2011 at 9:01 am | Report abuse |
  5. Roman, Butler PA

    Do you wonder why these events are taking place. Man has become so destructive. Oil; we start wars on a lie. Destroy millions of families around the world. We poison the ground, water and air for greed and power. Coal; we destroy mountain tops, water, forest for greed and power. Nuclear; we destroy cities, families, water, soil, for greed and power. Bury nuclear material deep in the ground. Material that has a shelf life of 10000 years. Then an earthquake occurs and contamination.

    Man was Baptized by Water and Spirit. The Fire of the Spirit. Mazda has a car that runs off of water. John Kanzius discovered that radiowaves ignite salt water to 3000 degrees.
    When God gives you a gift, knowledge you use it, not hide it in Area 51 or have the oil companies buy up all patents to secure thier greed and power.
    You want to know why these things are happening, read this blog; http://www.lordlionjc.blogspot.com
    I AM.

    March 13, 2011 at 9:13 am | Report abuse |
    • You're like a child

      These events have been happening for billions of years and will continue to happen despite the actions of man. Stop being such a paranoid idiot. Your type of hyper-paranoid ignorance never helps in these situations.

      March 13, 2011 at 9:30 pm | Report abuse |
    • Glenna

      TO YOUR LIKE A CHILD;
      Actually, we are to come to Jesus like a child; total acceptance, no pre-formed opinions, no cloudiness of knowledge. Christians will continue to plead with atheists to believe in Jesus, because we don't have the selfishness of wanting to go to Heaven without you. I, too, believe we are in the end times, even though most generations have felt this way; it seems we are more inundated in the last year with signs and wonders we are told to watch for, in Revelation. Even Jesus didn't know when the end would come. We ca;; it the "end", but it's a new beginning for believers, an end to the world as it was known. All the old things will pass away and there will be a new world and there will be no more war, no tears, no mourning......how can we not hope in this?
      I am ready, but God doesn't want any to perish so He waits and is patient. The Earth may not be able to wait, however. God may have to act sooner, than later. I pray for God's Will and for hardened hearts to soften to His Will as well. Amen.

      March 13, 2011 at 10:17 pm | Report abuse |
  6. No Science Guy

    Bill Nye is NO science guy!! Cs-137 used to "slow down the nuclear reaction". WRONG BILL just WRONG!

    March 13, 2011 at 9:16 am | Report abuse |
  7. intheknowy

    I would like to see more reports to the people about the effects this could have in the Global future . How is the weather a factor right now? How or will this affect America? Where Is the jet stream going to carry the fallout, in the very likely event that radioactivity is released into our atmosphere? We would be less anxious by being more informed and we are counting on you. I turn to you for my news information.

    March 13, 2011 at 9:17 am | Report abuse |
  8. GS

    Lighten up Francis...

    – Sgt. "Big Toe" Hulka

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LrllCZw8jiM

    March 13, 2011 at 9:21 am | Report abuse |
  9. Mike Sorrentino

    Well everyone should watch the Movie 2012 it maybe just a movie but its happening just the way it started in 2011 Myinshave there 3 tablets left in world museums it states rains and flooding will destroy mankind

    March 13, 2011 at 9:36 am | Report abuse |
    • GS

      If we can just get the aliens to land in 2012 we can use the end of the world to kill them too!

      March 13, 2011 at 9:45 am | Report abuse |
    • F MALINOSKY

      YOUR HEAD IS in a sad situation 2012 will be just another year!

      March 13, 2011 at 2:34 pm | Report abuse |
    • Grow up

      Mike, do you really think a Hollywood movie is a good reference for reality...Oh wait, you're just kidding. Aren't you? I hope you are my poor freind. Otherwise, you would be an idiot.

      March 13, 2011 at 9:43 pm | Report abuse |
    • Glenna

      THIS IS TO THE 2 WISEACRES WHO RESPONDED TO MIKE'S COMMENT.........

      You are aware of who wrote 2012, aren't you? It pays to have knowledge about something before you discredit it. Look up the name HAWKING. While this very intelligent young man may be writing about the world from a scientific point of view, I believe God is doing His work. HOWEVER, the 2 go together, closely . Whatever God wills is going to be manifest on the Earth. Scientists watch the Earth, Christians look to the sky. What if Christians are right?

      March 13, 2011 at 10:30 pm | Report abuse |
  10. No Science Guy

    As a matter of fact Bill... you are just all wrong!

    March 13, 2011 at 9:45 am | Report abuse |
  11. P.D

    @ Mike Sorrentino

    Why do people continually go on about the alignement of planets in 2012?? NO SUCH ALIGNMENT is going to happen, it's a myth. It's a FACT that it isn't going to happen. Not one single Astronemer/scientist has said it is going to happen. it is easily fooled people like you that perpetutate such nonsense.

    March 13, 2011 at 9:57 am | Report abuse |
  12. Bill from Rotonda Florida

    I've been listening to all these experts and I am left with the feeling that their math just doesn't add up. Don't get me wrong, I just want to understand this. The conservation of energy tell us that energy cannot be created or destroyed. It can only take different forms as it were. So, when the experts tell us that the tsunami hit the shore ate 500 mph, the math just doesn't add up. For that to happen, energy would have to be created and the conservation of energy tells us that cannot happen. To my mind, it makes more sense that that as the wave front gets closer to shore, mph swaps with wave height so that it hits the short with a wave heoght of 10-30 feet or so (instead of inches) but much slower than 500 mph. Everything balances out! The initial seismic event caused the tsunami; that is, when the tectonic plates moved into their new position. All that energy transfered to the column of water above the event. Hence a wave height of inches but a speed of 500 mph. In the meantime, the earth shakes for over 2 minutes. Does all the shaking transfer that energy to subsequent wavefronts. I don't believe that. Finally, when the experts talk about how a nuclear reactor works, I am once again left with more questions than answers. I don't know who to believe anymore.

    March 13, 2011 at 10:04 am | Report abuse |
    • Bill from Rotonda Florida

      One final thing (if anyone is actually looking at this). Thank God that water is incompressible. Otherwise I would not have a clue how to understand this.

      March 13, 2011 at 10:42 am | Report abuse |
    • domiro

      Quite right Bill. The leading edge of the tsunami encounters shallow water or even land, and slows down. The inertia of the water behind it pushes the water to the heights we see here. The videos clearly show the water moving much less than 500 mph. In open, deep water they do travel at incredible speeds, but with less height. You have a much better grasp of physics than reporters and most of their so-called "experts". Remember, they are paid according to ratings. Truth and common sense make for low ratings. Sensationalism and panic mongering make high ratings. Do THAT math!

      March 13, 2011 at 5:14 pm | Report abuse |
  13. Roxana Hannah

    How about helping. TEXT TsunamiRelief to 90210 ~ PAYPAL COVERS ALL PROCESSING COSTS – 100% of your donation reaches the charity of your choice!

    March 13, 2011 at 10:09 am | Report abuse |
  14. Bill from Rotonda Florida

    CNN, I challenge you to get the science facts right. When you talk about the wave front hitting the shore at 500mph, show us the math. When you talk about how a nuclear reactor works, show us the math.

    Hey guys, I'm talking about high school math here. Show us that you earned those advanced degrees.

    March 13, 2011 at 10:29 am | Report abuse |
    • Mariam

      Great Point!!! I've been glued to CNN and a lot of the numbers just don't add up. I just posted this myself:
      Can someone please answer this... because I can't get the "math" to add up. They say the tsunami wave generated was traveling at the rate of 600mph (we keep hearing how it was as fast a jet plane). Ok. We are also told the earthquake happened 80 miles off the coast of Senai. We also know the tsunami hit the coast about 30 minutes after the earthquake. THAT DOESN'T ADD UP. Something traveling 600mph, doesn't take 30 minutes to go 80 miles. Somebody PLEASE EXPLAIN.

      March 13, 2011 at 10:13 pm | Report abuse |
  15. FieldsofFolly

    I don't see the figure on CNN but yahoo news says "death toll likely over 10,000." That's horrible folks. I'm really disturbed and heart-broken for these people. We've really been lucky in the U.S. I don't know the death toll of Katrina. But I can't remember a natural distaster of this magnitude (and like the quakes in other countries) in my living years. Although I think there are a few faultlines that are overdue. (New Madrid being one of them.) (Genesis 12:3....)

    March 13, 2011 at 10:41 am | Report abuse |
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