Eight more U.S. counties named to White House drug-trafficking list
The White House says High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas help coordinate police efforts to combat drug use and production.
June 20th, 2011
12:50 PM ET

Eight more U.S. counties named to White House drug-trafficking list

New York's, Washington's and Atlanta's federally designated drug-trafficking zones just got a little bigger.

They're called High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas, to be exact, and they're designed to regionally coordinate law enforcement efforts to tackle issues such as drug production, distribution, chronic use and money laundering. Local, state and federal agencies operating in HIDTAs receive extra equipment, technology and other resources to combat drug trafficking.

Approximately 16% of the nation's counties - encompassing a whopping 60% of the population - fall within one of the 28 HIDTAs, according to the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy.

You can now add the following to the list: Orange County, New York; Mendocino County, California; Porter County, Indiana; Harford County, Maryland; Lexington and Richland counties, South Carolina; and Putnam and Mercer counties, West Virginia.

Border and port cities compose the majority of the HIDTAs, and some areas may cover multiple states. New York and New Jersey are in the same HIDTA, for instance, and Atlanta's HIDTA extends to North Carolina.

"Close collaboration with our federal, state, local, and tribal partners is a critical component of our efforts to reduce both the demand and supply of drugs," ONDCP Director Gil Kerlikowske said in a statement. "By designating these counties as HIDTAs, we will create a powerful catalyst for cooperation among federal, state, local and tribal agencies working to make our communities healthier and safer.”

Comprehensive efforts to address drug-related issues over the last three decades have resulted in an American drug use rate that is about half of what it was in the late 1970s, according to the statement. The Obama administration, it said, has committed more than $10 billion to drug-education programs and treatment for addicts, and more than $9 billion to law enforcement efforts.

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Filed under: Barack Obama • California • Crime • Drug violence • Drugs • Indiana • Maryland • New York • Politics • South Carolina • U.S. • West Virginia
soundoff (173 Responses)
  1. Joey Isotta-Fraschini

    I was born without screwing.

    June 20, 2011 at 1:01 pm | Report abuse |
  2. JBriggs

    Border and port cities compose the majority of the HIDTAs, and some areas may cover multiple states. New York and

    Jew Jersey (bad typo)

    are in the same HIDTA, for instance, and Atlanta's HIDTA extends to North Carolina.

    June 20, 2011 at 1:05 pm | Report abuse |
  3. Jazzzzzzzz

    Go away troll. That doesn't sound like our real Joey. Be gone.

    June 20, 2011 at 1:10 pm | Report abuse |
  4. Tommy

    "drug-related issues over the last three decades have resulted in an American drug use rate that is about half of what it was in the late 1970s,"

    How much did it cost to get to 1/2 of what it was in the 1970's?????? That is over 40 years ago! Hmmmmm! Maybe we should rethink this war on drugs!

    June 20, 2011 at 1:15 pm | Report abuse |
  5. Dicky

    Just another boon-doggle to get funding from the feds. No money is going to flow unless crime is up. So they make it up.

    June 20, 2011 at 1:17 pm | Report abuse |
  6. KittyCatCorn

    Jew Jersey, eh?

    June 20, 2011 at 1:17 pm | Report abuse |
  7. Christopher

    As I have said before, simply time to legalize/regulate/tax the drug trade. We have tried illegalizing it for nearly 80 years now, and it just hasn't worked at all. Legalize it and you get rid of the street dealers having to be violent to protect their product. Regulate it and you get rid of the widely varying dosages that lead to most cases of addiction. Tax it and you have a VERY LARGE source of funds that can be used to offset diminished funds in other areas.

    June 20, 2011 at 1:19 pm | Report abuse |
    • hillman

      but if they did that then nobody would want to do drugs lol because they wouldn't have a reason to be sneaky people like doing things that might get them into trouble so they deal and use drugs because the government says they cant.

      June 20, 2011 at 1:28 pm | Report abuse |
    • Bazoing

      Agreed: I do not use drugs and I think they are a nuisance to put it mildly. However, legalizing drugs would be a long term help to our neighbors to the south. It would make it easier to reduce the flow juveniles. It would force many criminals in all the countries involved, including the USA to seek a job. It would make Mexico fit to visit and live in again. As you indicated, it would save money ad bring in some revenue. I suspect the rate of use would go up briefly along with some other sad things and then it would go down some. This decease would be especially noticeable if we severely discouraged advertising that encourages use.

      June 20, 2011 at 1:44 pm | Report abuse |
  8. tommas

    This is a war on american citizens. At this point the only thing it is for is to justify police budgets and property seizures. And in addition keep the jail industry booming while replacing Jim Crow. SAD SAD SAD

    June 20, 2011 at 1:19 pm | Report abuse |
    • Annas still dead

      spot on!

      June 20, 2011 at 1:23 pm | Report abuse |
    • Saboth

      You got that right. But people are blind to the truth. I kind of think that's why the government wants to lower education funding because if the cattle got too smart, we'd probably toss our entire system out the window.

      June 20, 2011 at 2:00 pm | Report abuse |
  9. Annas still dead

    Send in the jack-booted thugs,. . . I mean the DEA.

    June 20, 2011 at 1:22 pm | Report abuse |
  10. Cdogg

    Well there's $19 billion dollars down the drain.

    June 20, 2011 at 1:23 pm | Report abuse |
  11. Annas still dead

    Dear Government: fo ck you!

    June 20, 2011 at 1:23 pm | Report abuse |
  12. NocommentCNN

    The US policy of waging a " War on Drugs" has become a shining example of wasted tax dollars and epic fail.
    If you can not keep drugs out of prisons, then how in the world even with billions spent on enforcement do you expect to keep it out of a free society?

    June 20, 2011 at 1:24 pm | Report abuse |
    • FYBER

      well said

      June 20, 2011 at 1:37 pm | Report abuse |
    • Fred Evil

      Exactly correct...now which politician will have the stones to put an end to this ridiculous charade? I thought Obama might be brave enough to, but now I am only hoping he;s waiting for his second term to start....I guarantee no right-winger will even consider it.

      June 20, 2011 at 4:16 pm | Report abuse |
  13. bluemax77

    Are you kidding, this is America we’re talking about, of course my county’s listed, along with the rest of the country...!!

    June 20, 2011 at 1:32 pm | Report abuse |
  14. Trevor

    Hey prohibition 2 isn't working either. Who would have guessed.

    June 20, 2011 at 1:32 pm | Report abuse |
    • Fred Evil

      Everybody but the DEA and the ONDCP, apparently...

      June 20, 2011 at 4:21 pm | Report abuse |
  15. Iconoclast

    Why won't you post my comment?

    June 20, 2011 at 1:38 pm | Report abuse |
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